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9/17/2020 5:59:48 PM
Posted: 4/17/2006 11:34:06 PM EDT
This could make for some interesting engines (think 95% torque from idle and 30000 RPM redlines)

http://paultan.org/archives/2005/07/14/camless-solenoid-valve-engines/

Jeff
Link Posted: 4/17/2006 11:44:15 PM EDT
awesome
Link Posted: 4/17/2006 11:47:58 PM EDT
Electronically driven and controlled solenoid valves.  Sounds like the way of the future to me.  They just need to invent a solenoid that has long term reliability under the stresses associated with an automobile engine.  

Sounds like something I'd like to read more about as information becomes available.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 12:01:43 AM EDT
Huh? No way. An F1 engine has Pneumatically actuated valves and all they can get is 250 peak tq and 18,000 RPM, and it's unreliable as all hell. No way you are getting that kind of torque curve with that redline.
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 12:04:03 AM EDT

Originally Posted By jhgray2:
This could make for some interesting engines (think 95% torque from idle and 30000 RPM redlines)

paultan.org/archives/2005/07/14/camless-solenoid-valve-engines/

Jeff



Okay, now it's hot!
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 12:08:54 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
Huh? No way. An F1 engine has Pneumatically actuated valves and all they can get is 250 peak tq and 18,000 RPM, and it's unreliable as all hell. No way you are getting that kind of torque curve with that redline.



Different system.. pneumatic is different than electronic solenoids... AFAIK. The technology is different as it uses an electric motor to actuate valves... need more info...
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 6:14:42 AM EDT
I have my doubts about this technology... It takes a lot of power from an actuator to move and close a valve. At lower RPM it's less of a problem, as the solenoid will have more time to get the valve open. At higher RPM I don't see where cycle time on the valve could be maintained and still get the right amount of lift from the valve-we are talking miliseconds here.

Now, I am going to assume that we are talking about a valve with no return spring (solenoid will close the valve as well as open it), and that valve opening is partially assisted by the incoming charge of fuel/air mixture. The problem with this is that the valve essentially becomes an assisted reed valve, and the advantage of being able to time the valve are lost.

Sounds like a lot of work to make it happen.... Probably won't be a "valve" in the conventional context.  I wonder how far the solenoid will be away from the valve? The further away, the worse it is because whatever connects the solenoid to the valve will be additional mass to accelerate. Speaking of heat, the solenoids themselves are going to get hotter than a motherfucker-it takes a lot of watts to move a solenoid capable of valve closure at 3500rpm (1/2 of a passenger car's rpm)

Dave
Link Posted: 4/18/2006 12:28:10 PM EDT

Originally Posted By jhgray2:

Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
Huh? No way. An F1 engine has Pneumatically actuated valves and all they can get is 250 peak tq and 18,000 RPM, and it's unreliable as all hell. No way you are getting that kind of torque curve with that redline.



Different system.. pneumatic is different than electronic solenoids... AFAIK. The technology is different as it uses an electric motor to actuate valves... need more info...



I know it's different, but there is no way that a hugely expensive F1 engine is going to fall that far short of somebody else's pet design. A different actuation system can't explain the difference.

It sounds like great technology to me, but I seriously doubt those claims.
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