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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/16/2005 5:33:19 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2005 5:33:33 AM EDT by Greywolf2112]
I live in West central FL, and here are the temperatures recorded, on average, during the year:

Jan Feb Mar Apr May Jun Jul Aug Sep Oct Nov Dec
Average temp. (°F) 60.9 62.4 66.8 71.1 76.9 81.2 82.5 82.5 81.0 75.0 68.8 62.9
High temperature (°F) 71.6 72.9 77.2 81.4 86.9 90.1 91.3 91.5 90.1 84.9 79.1 73.6
Low temperature (°F) 50.2 51.8 56.4 60.7 66.8 72.2 73.6 73.5 71.9 65.0 58.4 52.2


Given that the lowest is 50 degrees in the winter, and it averages about 60, I'm wondering, if when I replace my current Heat pump, if I should just go with a regular AC only and if I need heat just use some portable heaters. Any advantages/disadvantages to doing it this way?
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 5:38:14 AM EDT
I live in a rather large house and we have a heat pump. Not very efficent IMHO. Granted we get lowes in the 20's or lower in the middle of winter but it drives out light bill up to almost 400.00 a month somtimes. If you have a small to medium house maybe look into a Pellet stove. We have one in our living quarters down stairs and it is quite nice and efficient. it also is like having a wood stove but without all the wood or mess.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 5:39:53 AM EDT
After living in the mountains of TN, where it sometimes got to 0 degrees, I think 50 degrees in FL will feel like it was 70 outside - LOL.

I really don't know if we will ever need heat - when we lived in St. Pete for 3 years from 94-97, our heater came on 2 times in 3 years.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 5:40:10 AM EDT
Given your 'high' average 'low' temps I would say yes.

If it is really cold and humid then no.

BigDozer66
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 7:19:03 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/16/2005 7:20:13 AM EDT by Fenian]
I'm sure you'll regret it at some point, especially if you ever go to sell the house.

Heat pumps today are MUCH more efficient than they used to be, but energy costs are expensive these days, no matter what you use. Natural Gas used to be the bargain of the century...but not anymore. My gas bill has quadrupled in the last 5 years.

Lord help the folks in the NE part of the country who use oil heat this winter.

Graywolf, you ARE married, right? Do you honestly think your wife can go w/o heat at some point during the year?
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 7:39:30 AM EDT
Most heat pumps are ideal for what your doing. They're designed for moderate degrees of temperature diffrence at high efficiency - just what your doing.

In TN, you probably payed out the nose with one - that's because it got too cold, and your heat pump had a secondary heat source - almost always electric heaters... Which means that it was innefficient as hell when those were on. You won't have that in FL.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 4:29:56 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Fenian:
I'm sure you'll regret it at some point, especially if you ever go to sell the house.

Heat pumps today are MUCH more efficient than they used to be, but energy costs are expensive these days, no matter what you use. Natural Gas used to be the bargain of the century...but not anymore. My gas bill has quadrupled in the last 5 years.

Lord help the folks in the NE part of the country who use oil heat this winter.

Graywolf, you ARE married, right? Do you honestly think your wife can go w/o heat at some point during the year?



I could always use it as an excuse for a "cuddle"
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 4:30:33 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ASUsax:
Most heat pumps are ideal for what your doing. They're designed for moderate degrees of temperature diffrence at high efficiency - just what your doing.

In TN, you probably payed out the nose with one - that's because it got too cold, and your heat pump had a secondary heat source - almost always electric heaters... Which means that it was innefficient as hell when those were on. You won't have that in FL.



Luckily in TN we had a killer wood burning fireplace insert/stove.

Yeah, heat pump seems to be the way to go for many reasons, including resale.
Link Posted: 9/16/2005 4:44:27 PM EDT
I wouldn't count on recovering much of the heat pump's cost in resale value on your house. Here in South Texas, heat pumps aren't particularly popular, and many folks don't want one in a prospective new home (particularly if it's the only method of heating the house).

Also, there's the wear factor - The more often a compressor runs, the shorter its life expectancy.
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