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Posted: 1/28/2015 4:43:21 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2015 5:48:59 PM EDT by Ltlabner]
Over Christmas, Gramps gave me some more memorabilia from his mid-century walking tour of Europe.  I've posted some of this already but wanted to combine it all into one thread.

Maybe you all will find some of this enjoyable and interesting.

For starters: here is a picture of Gramps from before he left for Europe. Grandma had sent him some fancy pictures of herself and he had this one done in return. It was taken in Oxford, MS and currently sits on my nightstand along with his actual dog-tag. I'd take a picture of it but once I blank out his information it just looks like a dog tag. Suffice it to say, it's a cool to have in addition to this picture.

Sorry for the picture of a picture but I don't want to take this one in/out of the frame too often.





Along the way, before they deployed, Grandma sent Gramps this bracelet. The front side has his name and service number and the back is engraved "Love Squirt" which was his pet name for her. He kept this in his pocket throughout his adventures in Europe.





Of course no military service would be complete without proper medical documentation.



More to come....


Link Posted: 1/28/2015 4:44:34 PM EDT
More better come.............
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 4:46:54 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Chaingun:
More better come.............
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OP no longer has a say in it...


Better deliver OP.
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 4:47:59 PM EDT
Gramp's looks 12 in that pic lol
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 4:56:16 PM EDT
Gramps can't remember if this picture was taken in Europe or after he got back. He *thinks* it was in Europe because he basically threw away most everything he had once he got back. Please note the shiny CIB on the left chest. He's been looking for his CIB but can't find it. Thinks maybe Grandma threw it out.....





While the other two pictures are in Europe I think this one was taken before they deployed. Might have been in Mississippi or Louisiana when they were doing the Army Specialized Training Program. He spent some time at LSU and Old Miss before the Army ditched the program and the 94th was sent to war.

Link Posted: 1/28/2015 5:01:55 PM EDT
Below are some various paper trinkets that somehow survived.

The 94th sailed for England prior to deploying in Europe on the Queen Elizabeth 1. The blue ticket was was his mess card for the meals. Apparently he was none too impressed with British cooking and accommodations.

I'm not sure what the AEF club ticket on the upper right is. American European Forces Club maybe? He tells a story about how they held a raffle for a short pass to Paris at one point. Despite being a horrible solider who drove his Sergent's crazy he won. I *think* maybe this had something to do with that trip maybe. Who knows?





Link Posted: 1/28/2015 5:26:59 PM EDT
I'll type the text below but these two pictures are of a commendation for the 94th Infantry Division issued on 5-MAR 1945

The Division had cleared out the Saar-Moselle triangle and were preparing to drive deeper into Germany proper.

This is some sort of memo-graph/copy (it even says copy) but it somehow survived the war and made it back home. I've read copies of this commendation in books but this is the actual letter Gramps received.





The top part reads:

Headquarters XX Corps
Office of the Commanding General
APO 340 US Army

SUBJECT: Commendation 5 March 1945
TO: Commanding General, 94th Infantry Division, APO 94 US Army

1. Your division has most expeditiously accomplished its mission of clearing the Saar-Moselle triangle and seizing a bridgehead east of the Saar River. In so doing, it made a vital contribution to the capture of the fortified town of Trier.

2. The aggressive and efficient manner in which these missions have been carried out reflects great credit upon the division in keeping with the high traditions of the service and upon you as its Commanding General.

3. Your ability to rapidly take advantage of opportunities with out becoming involved in unwarranted delay has contributed substantially to the successful accomplishment of your mission.

4. You and the personnel of your command are hereby highly commended for your splendid performance of duty during this operation.

Walton H Walker
Major General
United States Army
Commanding


AG 201.22 (5MAR45) CG
HQ 94 INF DIV APO 94 US ARMY 28 MAR 45
TO: All soldiers of the 94th Division and Attached Units

1. This commendation from our Corps Commanders has been earned by the splendid efforts of each one of you individually and of these efforts I am fully aware.

2. I take great pleasure in transmitting this letter to each member of this command. It may be mailed to the United States provided no changes are made in it.

Harry J Malony
Major General, US Army
Commanding


Link Posted: 1/28/2015 5:40:55 PM EDT
Great stuff!  Looks like your grandfather and my uncle, Mike Gallinoto, fought for our freedoms in WWII.  Here is a partial history on his unit:

http://www.warfoto.com/3rdsocietyphotos.htm

They were called the Greatest Generation for good reason.
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 6:01:25 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2015 6:08:39 PM EDT by Ltlabner]
Apparently big Army wanted all the young men to write letters home to mom shortly after VE day. They were kind enough to provide the stationary on which to do so.

The print on the front is clear so I won't re-type that. However, the hand written note inside doesn't show very well so I'll type it out for everybody.

Interestingly, the hand written date inside is 22-April so about a week before Hitler did himself in.

Mike is Gramp's youngest brother who was born shortly before Gramps left/while he was gone (not sure on timing). Fooz is Gramp's other brother who is slightly younger than Gramps. He ended up at Keesler Air Force Base not all that far from where I type this. Mike and Fooz, like Gramps, are all alive and still full of piss and vinegar.



Dear Mother,

Haven't heard from you for a few days but here's a few words to let you know I'm all right. How are you and Pop getting along? Real fine I sure hope. How is Mike these days? Mean as ever I guess isn't he?

I sure hated to hear that Fooz had to go to the army. Send me his address as soon as you get it.

It's raining over here today and its turning colder too. How is it there?

Well Mother I'll close for now. Here's hoping you are fine. Here's wishing you a very happy Mothers day.

Write real soon
.

Link Posted: 1/28/2015 6:04:06 PM EDT
Very cool.  Thanks for sharing and God Bless your Gramps.  
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 6:19:46 PM EDT
You remember the halcyon days of V-Mail? Yea, I'd never heard of it either until Gramps gave me this piece over Christmas.

From wiki - V-mail, short for Victory Mail, is a hybrid mail process used during the Second World War in America as the primary and secure method to correspond with soldiers stationed abroad. To reduce the logistics of transferring an original letter across the military postal system, a V-mail letter would be censored, copied to film, and printed back to paper upon arrival at its destination. The V-mail process is based on the earlier British Airgraph[1] process.[2]
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So even back in the day the .gov was recording our communications. Imagine the fun GD would have had arguing over this.

I've cropped the identifying information off the top but this is dated 29-MAY 1945 so after the war. Interestingly, it was sent to his mother who had (along with Pop) gone off to Detroit to work in a factory during the war.

There's another reference to young Mike, the youngest brother who was a baby while Gramps was away. In fact, baby Mike is about 1 year younger than my mother.

Looks like the local newspaper started to make it's way over to the troops. Gramps remembered that you could request local copies and sometimes it showed up, sometimes it didn't. When it did it was horribly out of date (see the reference to being over a month old).

On the more somber side, notice the comment about "been lucky after all" and worrying about being sent to the South Pacific (I'll have to dig into the battle stars comments but I'm assuming it's some sort of points system).



Link Posted: 1/28/2015 6:55:36 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By RayFromJersey:
Gramp's looks 12 in that pic lol
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Yea, not exactly striking fear in the heart of the enemy based on his overwhelming physical stature.

I'm guessing he was about 19 or so in that picture.


Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:02:39 PM EDT
it's intresting that he is wearing Engineer brass in the picture but he got a CIB .......
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:04:57 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Coltman77:
Very cool.  Thanks for sharing and God Bless your Gramps.  
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Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:07:56 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By 12a10:
it's intresting that he is wearing Engineer brass in the picture but he got a CIB .......
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Everyone was infantry coded back then. Even Signal, if I recall correctly.
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:10:49 PM EDT
His shot records were never good enough...

I bet he got triple the amount of shots on those records.
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:13:47 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2015 7:17:23 PM EDT by Ltlabner]
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Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:


Everyone was infantry coded back then. Even Signal, if I recall correctly.
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Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:
Originally Posted By 12a10:
it's intresting that he is wearing Engineer brass in the picture but he got a CIB .......


Everyone was infantry coded back then. Even Signal, if I recall correctly.


I *think* that first picture posted (the one from my nightstand) is from when he was in the Army Specialized Training Program prior to that program ending. That would make sense, as I have a certificate showing his completion of Basic Engineering I at the University of Mississippi in March 1944. It would explain the engineer emblem on the hat and the (I think) 8th Armored Group flash on his left shoulder.

After ASTP program is ended he was dumped in the infantry and ended up in the 94th.



ETA: I have the original envelope for this certificate also and it says: University of Mississippi. Department of Military Science and Tactics. University, MISS in the traditional return address location.
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:15:09 PM EDT
God bless your grandpa
Great post, op
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:23:54 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By bagofcrabs65:
His shot records were never good enough...

I bet he got triple the amount of shots on those records.
View Quote


He has joked about the needles used for the shots a number of times. He describes them being about "that big" and holds up his index finger and thumb kinda like you'd do when making the OK sign. Apparently blood born pathogens weren't much of an issue either as the orderly would draw up a massive syringe full of whatever medical stuff was in the shot and then pump a squirt into each solider that passed by until it was empty.

Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:28:28 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/28/2015 7:28:40 PM EDT by EvanWilliams]
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Originally Posted By Ltlabner:


He has joked about the needles used for the shots a number of times. He describes them being about "that big" and holds up his index finger and thumb kinda like you'd do when making the OK sign. Apparently blood born pathogens weren't much of an issue either as the orderly would draw up a massive syringe full of whatever medical stuff was in the shot and then pump a squirt into each solider that passed by until it was empty.

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Originally Posted By Ltlabner:
Originally Posted By bagofcrabs65:
His shot records were never good enough...

I bet he got triple the amount of shots on those records.


He has joked about the needles used for the shots a number of times. He describes them being about "that big" and holds up his index finger and thumb kinda like you'd do when making the OK sign. Apparently blood born pathogens weren't much of an issue either as the orderly would draw up a massive syringe full of whatever medical stuff was in the shot and then pump a squirt into each solider that passed by until it was empty.



Bsck the needles had to be sharpened  by hand, syringes washed and reassembled
Ain't No body got time fo dat
Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:32:56 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:


Bsck the needles had to be sharpened  by hand, syringes washed and reassembled
Ain't No body got time fo dat
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Originally Posted By EvanWilliams:
Originally Posted By Ltlabner:
Originally Posted By bagofcrabs65:
His shot records were never good enough...

I bet he got triple the amount of shots on those records.


He has joked about the needles used for the shots a number of times. He describes them being about "that big" and holds up his index finger and thumb kinda like you'd do when making the OK sign. Apparently blood born pathogens weren't much of an issue either as the orderly would draw up a massive syringe full of whatever medical stuff was in the shot and then pump a squirt into each solider that passed by until it was empty.



Bsck the needles had to be sharpened  by hand, syringes washed and reassembled
Ain't No body got time fo dat




The other story he tells is about when they asked if he wanted to buy life insurance. It was around $12 of the $50 a month they paid him IIRC. I'll have to confirm those numbers. Whatever the actual numbers they were a big chunk of his Private's pay so he said he didn't want it. The Sargent told him, "ok, go stand over there until we can get to you" as most people were taking it. Gramps went and stood in the corner for a good long while. Going back up to the line he was again asked if he wanted insurance. Again he said no and was instructed to go stand in the corner until they could get to him.

I'm sure the amount of time he spent standing off to the side has grown since the 1940's but apparently it took several iterations before it sunk in that he was taking the damn insurance whether he wanted it or not.

Link Posted: 1/28/2015 7:59:02 PM EDT

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Originally Posted By Ltlabner:
I *think* that first picture posted (the one from my nightstand) is from when he was in the Army Specialized Training Program prior to that program ending. That would make sense, as I have a certificate showing his completion of Basic Engineering I at the University of Mississippi in March 1944. It would explain the engineer emblem on the hat and the (I think) 8th Armored Group flash on his left shoulder.



After ASTP program is ended he was dumped in the infantry and ended up in the 94th.



http://i1227.photobucket.com/albums/ee427/ltlabner/Gramps/7762A7AC-650F-49A4-9C69-7FC954AFB4D8_zpsszu0ovnu.jpg



ETA: I have the original envelope for this certificate also and it says: University of Mississippi. Department of Military Science and Tactics. University, MISS in the traditional return address location.

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Originally Posted By Ltlabner:



Originally Posted By Combat_Jack:


Originally Posted By 12a10:

it's intresting that he is wearing Engineer brass in the picture but he got a CIB .......




Everyone was infantry coded back then. Even Signal, if I recall correctly.




I *think* that first picture posted (the one from my nightstand) is from when he was in the Army Specialized Training Program prior to that program ending. That would make sense, as I have a certificate showing his completion of Basic Engineering I at the University of Mississippi in March 1944. It would explain the engineer emblem on the hat and the (I think) 8th Armored Group flash on his left shoulder.



After ASTP program is ended he was dumped in the infantry and ended up in the 94th.



http://i1227.photobucket.com/albums/ee427/ltlabner/Gramps/7762A7AC-650F-49A4-9C69-7FC954AFB4D8_zpsszu0ovnu.jpg



ETA: I have the original envelope for this certificate also and it says: University of Mississippi. Department of Military Science and Tactics. University, MISS in the traditional return address location.

That is an SSI (Shoulder Sleeve Insignia), often referred to as a "Patch".  In the top photo, he is wearing the 8th Armored Division Patch, but all his paperwork indicates the 94th Infantry Division.

 







Link Posted: 1/28/2015 8:03:37 PM EDT





Thanks for sharing.




Not to many left like him.




Link Posted: 1/28/2015 9:42:33 PM EDT
Talked to Gramps tonight and got him to tell me the story he's told a few times about "the best drink he's ever had".

The story takes place somewhere near Ludwigshafen, which dates it to possibly between 20 to 24-March of 1944. The 94th had been on a long drive into Germany and, as Gramps puts it, had "been tearing up the patch".

Along the way he and a buddy spotted an old woman carrying a basket of twigs, ostensibly for a fire. Apparently it was a sorry looking pile of twigs but all the woman could muster. Keeping in mind that old to a 20 year old is relative (she could have been 50 something for all he knew) the stark reality was it was all the old woman had. For whatever reason Gramps and the buddy helped her carry the basket of twigs to the hovel that was her house.

Apparently she motioned for them to stay and she quickly reappeared with a small tray with a green bottle of what turned out to be Schnapps. She poured them all a drink and then had the presence of mind to take a drink to reassure them it wasn't poisoned or tainted.

As Gramps put it, she offered me a drink......and I took it. He's never been shy about having a drink or two so I'm sure that situation was no different.

You could almost hear him reliving the scene in his mind as he retold the story.

As he told it he wasn't really sure why he helped her carry the basket, or why she was nice enough to reciprocate with a drink, but in the midst of all he had been experiencing it was a touching dose of humanity.


Link Posted: 1/28/2015 9:52:04 PM EDT
Thank you for sharing, OP.

Link Posted: 1/28/2015 9:54:09 PM EDT
Neat stuff, thanks for sharing it with us.

Here's an interesting book I found online written by a Don Parks, who also was in ASTP in U Miss and moved to the 94th.  Perhaps your grandfather knew him.

http://historicaltextarchive.com/books.php?action=nextpre&bid=71


Also, here's some info on the ASTP that is in the history forum:

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_1_63/1645340_Collegiate_Soldiers__the_Army_Specialized_Training_Program_in_WWII.html
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 9:20:04 AM EDT
Gramps was given this booklet after he got back. I'll have to go though it and see if there's anything interesting in it.



Not sure of the timing but after he got back he somehow got this little booklet. It's a short graphic history of the 94th with pictures and text. It's in pretty bad shape.

Link Posted: 1/29/2015 11:15:18 AM EDT
Gramps gave me this last year.

It's a camera he brought home from the war. He has the piece of paper authorizing him to bring it back (I've seen it) but I don't have physical possession of that paper. Like I said, I've seen it and that makes this piece even more cool IMO.







Information about the camera mined from the interwebs....

A basic 6x9 folding roll film camera, which uses 620 film format. The 620 film was introduced by Kodak in 1931 as an alternative to the 120. It is nearly the same film on a slightly different all metal spool.

There are a large variety of Kodak cameras with a model name "Junior". If you just mention "Kodak Junior" you might mean one type in a group of over a dozen different cameras.This Kodak Junior 620 is one of the latest models. The Production begun in 1933 by Contessa Nettel Germany and was terminated in 1939. (In Germany)

The lens is Kodak Anastigmat 1:7,7/10,5cm. The shutter speeds are T, B, 1/25, 1/50, 1/100, 1/125. You may notice a self timer but not a flash contact because there isn't´t any. The shutter release is as usual on the shutter housing which also has a cable-release socket.

The camera has a waist level and a frame eye level viewfinders.
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Link Posted: 1/29/2015 11:30:26 AM EDT
Great story OP.

Respectfully,  It appears that Gramps was an Engineer. Did they issue CIB's to Engineers in those days?
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 11:38:40 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/29/2015 11:40:05 AM EDT by Ltlabner]
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Originally Posted By Justice23:
Great story OP.

Respectfully,  It appears that Gramps was an Engineer. Did they issue CIB's to Engineers in those days?
View Quote


Addressed further up thread.

The engineer badge/8th armor patch picture was *I think* from when he was in Army Specialized Training Program prior to the cancellation of that program. He refers to that as "the good times" when he spent time at LSU and Ole Miss.

Then the Army canceled the program and dumped everybody in the infantry. That's when he ended up in the 94th as a regular infantry guy.

Link Posted: 1/29/2015 1:36:05 PM EDT
Great pics OP. Always cool to see "new" pics that haven't been in circulation.
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 1:41:00 PM EDT
Outstanding! thanks for the post and God Bless him!
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 7:44:24 PM EDT
No memorabilia to share in this post but here's Gramps in the 1970's with my brother and yours truly in the bottom right corner.

Gramps still lives in that same house with the same table and that light fixture. Sat at that table many many times eating Grandma's cooking on special sleep overs at their house. Hell, sat at that very table, at the chair basically where I'm standing in that picture, as recently as October.



Here's a picture of him from 6 or 7 years ago playing some silly game over in Scotland.



Thanks to GD for indulging me to post this one as I know it's not got any real historical significance.

Link Posted: 1/29/2015 10:00:38 PM EDT
Evening bump.
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 10:10:45 PM EDT
Thank you for sharing these family treasures with us. My grandfather was also Army in Europe but he never really talked about his service. I wish I could find out more about what he did. I don't even have a unit or anything.
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 11:15:01 PM EDT
Thank you OP for the epic post. Even day to day life big or small is important in my book. Just glad the Internet became a thing while people of your Grandfathers Generation are alive, and things are recorded and posted.  Will gladly take any, and everything they have to tell.
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 11:20:33 PM EDT
Thank you Grandpa
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 11:23:58 PM EDT
Thanks for sharing!
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 11:29:47 PM EDT

Man that was awesome. Please tell your Grandfather thank you!


Bigfeet
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 11:31:49 PM EDT
Great stuff, thanks!
Link Posted: 1/29/2015 11:48:36 PM EDT
Nice to meet your grandpa.

Here's me and my grandpa a few years ago.

Buried in Arlington, Army Intelligence. We have a Beretta pocket pistol he stole from a German officer's desk
Link Posted: 1/30/2015 10:00:24 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Ltlabner:


Addressed further up thread.

The engineer badge/8th armor patch picture was *I think* from when he was in Army Specialized Training Program prior to the cancellation of that program. He refers to that as "the good times" when he spent time at LSU and Ole Miss.

Then the Army canceled the program and dumped everybody in the infantry. That's when he ended up in the 94th as a regular infantry guy.

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Originally Posted By Ltlabner:
Originally Posted By Justice23:
Great story OP.

Respectfully,  It appears that Gramps was an Engineer. Did they issue CIB's to Engineers in those days?


Addressed further up thread.

The engineer badge/8th armor patch picture was *I think* from when he was in Army Specialized Training Program prior to the cancellation of that program. He refers to that as "the good times" when he spent time at LSU and Ole Miss.

Then the Army canceled the program and dumped everybody in the infantry. That's when he ended up in the 94th as a regular infantry guy.



Thanks.  This is a cool thread.

Link Posted: 1/31/2015 9:28:39 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/31/2015 9:32:18 AM EDT by Ltlabner]
Here's a picture of Gramps I *think* during the war. Maybe he is on a pass or something. I'll have to set this picture aside and get more details on it next time I see him. Those don't look like military clothes but the age is right to be the 1940's and he didn't go back to that area until the 1970's which would have been a color photo, likely had Grandma in it, etc.

Bottom line, don't really know much about what is going on in this picture.

However, look closely at his right hand/wrist. I'm not positive but I'm fairly sure that's the bracelet Grandma sent him which is shown in one of the first pictures above (the one that says "Love Squirt" on the back. That's pretty damn cool.

Link Posted: 1/31/2015 9:38:08 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/31/2015 9:40:13 AM EDT by EvanWilliams]
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Originally Posted By Ltlabner:
Talked to Gramps tonight and got him to tell me the story he's told a few times about "the best drink he's ever had".

The story takes place somewhere near Ludwigshafen, which dates it to possibly between 20 to 24-March of 1944. The 94th had been on a long drive into Germany and, as Gramps puts it, had "been tearing up the patch".

Along the way he and a buddy spotted an old woman carrying a basket of twigs, ostensibly for a fire. Apparently it was a sorry looking pile of twigs but all the woman could muster. Keeping in mind that old to a 20 year old is relative (she could have been 50 something for all he knew) the stark reality was it was all the old woman had. For whatever reason Gramps and the buddy helped her carry the basket of twigs to the hovel that was her house.

Apparently she motioned for them to stay and she quickly reappeared with a small tray with a green bottle of what turned out to be Schnapps. She poured them all a drink and then had the presence of mind to take a drink to reassure them it wasn't poisoned or tainted.

As Gramps put it, she offered me a drink......and I took it. He's never been shy about having a drink or two so I'm sure that situation was no different.

You could almost hear him reliving the scene in his mind as he retold the story.

As he told it he wasn't really sure why he helped her carry the basket, or why she was nice enough to reciprocate with a drink, but in the midst of all he had been experiencing it was a touching dose of humanity.


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Yep, better than the best drink in the fanciest bar. He remembers it to this day. The spirit in which it was offered and the context made all the difference.
That's awesome.

If you're grandpa had been a Russian soldier that story would be very different.

Once again, God Bless your grampaw.
Link Posted: 1/31/2015 9:39:17 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Jacobdw:
Nice to meet your grandpa.

Here's me and my grandpa a few years ago.
https://fbcdn-sphotos-c-a.akamaihd.net/hphotos-ak-xaf1/v/t1.0-9/267842_10100343356966743_4328404_n.jpg?oh=94a900a86137cd51f742a08e3afa6b87&oe=55689B83&__gda__=1431465554_5c86c9d220405d9616a616b05f9d738f
Buried in Arlington, Army Intelligence. We have a Beretta pocket pistol he stole from a German officer's desk
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When I go to the National cemetery on Veteran's day and Memorial day, too many graves with no visitors.
Not everyone cares about their dead parents and grandparents.

Good job, man.
Link Posted: 1/31/2015 9:39:18 AM EDT
Link Posted: 1/31/2015 9:51:59 AM EDT
Awesome thread.. thanks for sharing.
Link Posted: 1/31/2015 11:23:53 AM EDT
Here's some other pictures Gramps has given me. Not sure the story on these gentleman but next time I see Gramps I'll get the background story.





Link Posted: 1/31/2015 11:33:51 AM EDT
Cool, OP. Thanks for sharing. Your grandpa is one of the greatest men that ever walked this Earth. Takes a special kind of person to be a soldier, more so in a time of war.
Link Posted: 1/31/2015 11:34:26 AM EDT
Thanks for sharing.
Link Posted: 1/31/2015 11:54:23 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/31/2015 12:01:03 PM EDT by JQ66]
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Originally Posted By Ltlabner:
Gramps gave me this last year.

It's a camera he brought home from the war. He has the piece of paper authorizing him to bring it back (I've seen it) but I don't have physical possession of that paper. Like I said, I've seen it and that makes this piece even more cool IMO.

http://i1227.photobucket.com/albums/ee427/ltlabner/Gramps/6C6B595B-109F-4FB8-8ABC-ACD6F67E8D7B_zpsbnsolghw.jpg

http://i1227.photobucket.com/albums/ee427/ltlabner/Gramps/FB00AA64-1B49-422D-B530-8EDD8F152A99_zpsfm0sbva4.jpg

http://i1227.photobucket.com/albums/ee427/ltlabner/Gramps/B63512D8-4956-4A99-9E35-D860A9F25E79_zpsvgvuvgyf.jpg

Information about the camera mined from the interwebs....

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Originally Posted By Ltlabner:
Gramps gave me this last year.

It's a camera he brought home from the war. He has the piece of paper authorizing him to bring it back (I've seen it) but I don't have physical possession of that paper. Like I said, I've seen it and that makes this piece even more cool IMO.

http://i1227.photobucket.com/albums/ee427/ltlabner/Gramps/6C6B595B-109F-4FB8-8ABC-ACD6F67E8D7B_zpsbnsolghw.jpg

http://i1227.photobucket.com/albums/ee427/ltlabner/Gramps/FB00AA64-1B49-422D-B530-8EDD8F152A99_zpsfm0sbva4.jpg

http://i1227.photobucket.com/albums/ee427/ltlabner/Gramps/B63512D8-4956-4A99-9E35-D860A9F25E79_zpsvgvuvgyf.jpg

Information about the camera mined from the interwebs....

A basic 6x9 folding roll film camera, which uses 620 film format. The 620 film was introduced by Kodak in 1931 as an alternative to the 120. It is nearly the same film on a slightly different all metal spool.

There are a large variety of Kodak cameras with a model name "Junior". If you just mention "Kodak Junior" you might mean one type in a group of over a dozen different cameras.This Kodak Junior 620 is one of the latest models. The Production begun in 1933 by Contessa Nettel Germany and was terminated in 1939. (In Germany)

The lens is Kodak Anastigmat 1:7,7/10,5cm. The shutter speeds are T, B, 1/25, 1/50, 1/100, 1/125. You may notice a self timer but not a flash contact because there isn't´t any. The shutter release is as usual on the shutter housing which also has a cable-release socket.

The camera has a waist level and a frame eye level viewfinders.



I think I have one of those , too.  I have about all of the german stuff my great uncle (I guess that's the term - my grandmother's brother) brought back.  He died around 1970.  He was in the 6th armored division.  So I don't really know what he did in the war, but he did apparently make it to tech sergeant.  I think he would have been in his mid twenties then.  Only weapon brought back that I know of was a KAR 98K, which unfortunately my grandfather had sporterized.  I had the original stock around somewhere.  I hope my parents didn't throw it out, as I would like to restore it as much as possible.  They did a magazine like the one you posted too, but it was done before they went to europe.  Also have a flag that would have been used on a vehicle (grommets on all four corners), wife beater tank tops for PT, helmet, army dagger, sword, lots of pins, and a parachute (all that is left is the drogue chute).

Maybe there ought to be a section where people can post about their relatives who served, instead of GD?   I don't know if the one for military members is appropriate for this sort of history.
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