Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
BCM
User Panel

Posted: 7/22/2010 4:05:30 PM EDT
If I pay for 93 octane, high grade fuel - how do I know that is actually what's going into my car?




Link Posted: 7/22/2010 4:06:19 PM EDT
[#1]
Quoted:
If I pay for 93 octane, high grade fuel - how do I know that is actually what's going into my car?



If you had a car that required 93 and you actually put in 87, you'd know.  

If you have a car that doesn't require 93, you're wasting money in order to buy a shittier fuel.

Link Posted: 7/22/2010 4:09:21 PM EDT
[#2]



Quoted:


If I pay for 93 octane, high grade fuel - how do I know that is actually what's going into my car?





Well, since you are in Texas and this is controlled by the Tx Dept of Agriculture, they do spot checks for both dispensed volume and grade.  There are labs which test.



Since most gasoline sold retail now has 5-10% ethanol, the measured AKI will be substantially higher.  10% ethanol will rais 87 to at least 89, although no one labels it as such.



 
Link Posted: 7/22/2010 4:11:20 PM EDT
[#3]



Quoted:



Quoted:

If I pay for 93 octane, high grade fuel - how do I know that is actually what's going into my car?







If you had a car that required 93 and you actually put in 87, you'd know.  

The car does require 93. I've never put in 87.



Is it a different mixture of fuel? Additives put in at the pump?





 
Link Posted: 7/22/2010 4:23:28 PM EDT
[#4]
Quoted:

Quoted:
Quoted:
If I pay for 93 octane, high grade fuel - how do I know that is actually what's going into my car?



If you had a car that required 93 and you actually put in 87, you'd know.  
The car does require 93. I've never put in 87.

Is it a different mixture of fuel? Additives put in at the pump?

 



Yep, different mixtures of all sorts of shit probably and all sorts of formulas to compute the right mixture.  The key is that unleaded gas ignites or combusts at certain pressure/temperatures in the cylinders.  The higher the octane rating, the less likely the engine will knock due to premature ignition (i.e. if your vehicle has spark plugs, you want the spark plugs to ignite the fuel).  

Cars with turbos and performance cars with higher compression ratios usually require a higher octane.  Very high compression ratio engines run on diesel, propane, methanol, ect..



Close Join Our Mail List to Stay Up To Date! Win a FREE Membership!

Sign up for the ARFCOM weekly newsletter and be entered to win a free ARFCOM membership. One new winner* is announced every week!

You will receive an email every Friday morning featuring the latest chatter from the hottest topics, breaking news surrounding legislation, as well as exclusive deals only available to ARFCOM email subscribers.


By signing up you agree to our User Agreement. *Must have a registered ARFCOM account to win.
Top Top