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11/22/2017 10:05:29 PM
Posted: 8/24/2004 9:18:24 PM EST
Old soldier ... recalled

A 57-year-old Vietnam and 1991 Persian Gulf War veteran with skin cancer, partial deafness, high blood pressure and a 100 percent Veterans Administration disability is being told to report for active duty.

Army Sgt. Luis Jaime Treviño of McAllen, Texas, was told on July 14 — for the third time — to mobilize for duty in Iraq.

“I was very shocked,” Treviño told The Monitor newspaper in Texas.

Notwithstanding his medical problems, Treviño is a member of the Army’s Individual Ready Reserve and may be called to active duty if his skills are needed.

He called the Army hot line listed on his orders, he told the paper.

“Am I reading this thing right? At my age, you still want me?” he asked.

Julia Collins, a spokeswoman for the Human Resources Command in St. Louis, said a delay and exemption board will review Treviño’s request and make a decision.

“If I have to go, I’ll go. That’s my job. I’m not a coward,” he told The Monitor. “The only concern I have is my skin cancer and my age. I’m pushing 58. I’m an old dingbat.”


http://www.marinecorpstimes.com/story.php?f=1-MARINEPAPER-302504.php
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 9:20:14 PM EST
57-year-old veteran called for dutyBy Brittney Booth

The McAllen MonitorMCAllenTexasPacific SouthWestUSA - McALLEN — He’s 57 years old, afflicted with skin cancer, partially deaf and suffers from high blood pressure. But the U.S. Army still wants Master Sgt. Luis Jaime Treviño.

On July 14, the Vietnam and Desert Storm veteran received his third order to report to active duty — mobilized for Operation Iraqi Freedom.

"I was very shocked," Treviño said, a member of the Army’s Individual Ready Reserve. IRRs are not part of a reserve unit, do not get paid and do not attend monthly reserve training. However, because of critical skills they possess, they can be recalled to duty if needed.

In disbelief, he called the Army hotline listed on his orders.

"Am I reading this thing right? At my age you still want me?" he asked.

But there was no mistake. Treviño is to report to a mobilization unit Sept. 15 at Fort Jackson, S.C. "If I do not execute these orders, I go to jail," he said.

Treviño, a Rio Grande City native, served in the U.S. Air Force during the Vietnam War, and then joined the Army reserves in 1972. The former middle school teacher also served during Desert Storm in 1991. And though Treviño is willing to serve again, he wonders why the military wants him.

"I’m honored to go, but I’m disabled and I’m too old," he said.

But the Army disagrees.

Reservists under the age of 60 are being activated, said Public Affairs Specialist Julia Collins of the Human Resources Command in St. Louis.

"I know many guys who are in that position," she said. "It’s not unusual."

While Treviño’s age does not disqualify him from serving, his medical condition may.

The U.S. Veteran’s Administration considers Treviño 100 percent disabled because of the cancerous cells on his face and his bilateral hearing loss.

His middle left finger is bandaged, hiding the portion doctors removed on Thursday for a biopsy. He also takes medicine daily to control his blood pressure and hypertension.

However, the V.A. has no bearing on the Army’s decision, so Treviño is requesting an exemption from the Delay and Exemption Board.

Collins said the delay and exemption board will review Treviño’s request for an exemption along with a doctor’s verification of his medical condition. Medical conditions are evaluated on a case by case basis.

"Because it sounds like he has medical issues, it will probably go to surgeon’s office for review," she said.

The delay and exemption board will then make a recommendation, the legal department will review it. The commander will make a final ruling as to whether Treviño will go to Iraq, she said.

"Obviously they intend not to send people who have severe medical conditions," she said. "We have to send soldiers that are physically fit to serve their country."

Though his physical health is less than sterling, Treviño thinks the Army may need his expertise. Treviño is a refueling specialist, an expert in petroleum, oils and lubricants.

"The Army is going to try to keep me there. Sergeants are very high in demand," he said.

Collins agreed that Treviño’s skill is needed.

"That definitely would be something that would be sought after, especially when transportation and supply routes are important," she said.

Treviño’s military pride is evident in his North McAllen home. Photographs taken of Treviño in his Air Force and Army Reserve uniforms adorn the walls and he converted a bedroom into a storage room for his hobby — model military airplanes.

He re-enlisted in the Individual Ready Reserve in 2003 because "I wanted to stay in for a hobby." However, he didn’t anticipate being sent to active duty.

"If I have to go, I’ll go. That’s my job. I’m not a coward," he said. "The only concern I have is my skin cancer and my age. I’m pushing 58. I’m an old dingbat."

He also worries for his parents in Rio Grande City.

"My parents are honored for me to go. They are very proud of me," he said. "But they are concerned."
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 9:22:22 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/24/2004 9:24:47 PM EST by AR15fan]
Do a few cancerous skin lesians prevent you from pulling a trigger? Looks like he is willing to fulfill his obligations though. Good for him, He's a better man than the youngsters complaining that they only enlisted for the college money.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 9:23:02 PM EST
[Last Edit: 8/24/2004 9:24:33 PM EST by olyarms]
Its still BS.
Does a missing leg prevent you from pulling a trigger. Hell what stops us from sending over some welfare babies? They know how to pull a trigger.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 9:26:22 PM EST

Originally Posted By olyarms:
Its still BS.
Does a missing leg prevent you from pulling a trigger.



No, and with the type of artificial limbs available now amputies and even double amputies can remain on active duty.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 9:40:50 PM EST
The USA military has called up many elder soldiers. I have posted on story on this very subject in the Halls of Heroes forum.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 9:47:38 PM EST
No but he would sure be someone to be reckoned with,he doesn't have much to lose!

I wouldn't want to get in a mexican stand off with him!

Bob
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 9:48:04 PM EST
Note: He re-upped his IRR committment voluntarily in 2003...

Link Posted: 8/24/2004 9:51:38 PM EST

Originally Posted By AR15fan:

Originally Posted By olyarms:
Its still BS.
Does a missing leg prevent you from pulling a trigger.



No, and with the type of artificial limbs available now amputies and even double amputies can remain on active duty.


How many people do you know with missing legs? The one I know has a few fake legs and they are all pretty dam expensive ($1.000's+) and he hates wearing them because after standing for a few minutes I guess they hurt like hell, even with the padding. He walks with one leg more than with two.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 10:04:38 PM EST
Right here in Oklahoma city on tenth street right east of Portland ave is the worlds best Artificial limb manufactor! World class hadicapped runners come here to get there legs!

I think they even made some of the hands for the Iraqi people whom suffered at Sadamms reign!

Not everbody funtions as well as others with artifical limbs!

Bob
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 10:10:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By bobbyjack:
Not everbody funtions as well as others with artifical limbs!

Bob



Exactly, same thing with cancer, same thing with life.


Do a few cancerous skin lesians prevent you from pulling a trigger?


Well for my father a few cancerous legions put over 30lbs of fluid into his stomach and killed him in a matter of 7months.

He could have pulled a trigger up to the time he died, should he have? Hell no, who sends their sick to fight a war.
Link Posted: 8/24/2004 10:25:24 PM EST

Originally Posted By olyarms:

Originally Posted By AR15fan:

Originally Posted By olyarms:
Its still BS.
Does a missing leg prevent you from pulling a trigger.



No, and with the type of artificial limbs available now amputies and even double amputies can remain on active duty.


How many people do you know with missing legs?



I met two Marine NCO's at SHOT 2004, who lost limbs but were returning to active duty. The military spends so much training these guys that they cant afford to toss them out.
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 12:12:16 AM EST

Originally Posted By olyarms:
How many people do you know with missing legs?


There are a lot more in the military in the last 2 years of armed conflict than there have been in the past 30 years.After all, with the body armor thats being worn, a lot of the WIA are extremity injuries, including amputees. Maybe back 30 years ago they just tossed these guys out, but now they retain them where possible. There was just an article on this somewhere that I read.
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 12:22:10 AM EST
Hmm, dont think the guy should be out there, but hats off to him for saying he'd go if they want him.

/Phil
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 2:35:56 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/25/2004 2:38:31 AM EST by Garand_Shooter]
He won't go overseas he wouldn't pass the mob physical, but I am willing to be he ends up teaching new recruits to free another NCO to go overseas.
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 2:49:52 AM EST
Here I am only 50% disabled and cant get recalled and this guy does? Dam the bad luck!
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 3:10:58 AM EST
[Last Edit: 8/25/2004 3:11:42 AM EST by Bubbatheredneck]

It all depends on just how disabled he is. The VA disability system can be a real mickey mouse affair. I have seen vets that have just the right number of "magic" injuries that bumps them into the disabled category, and on the flip side, the truly disabled that fall through the cracks. Without looking at his records, I wouldn't go out on a limb either way. Either the army or VA screwed up.

When you go to a VA hospital, and you see all the vets missing legs, do you know what happened??? The majority lost them to smoking and the resulting peripheral vascular disease. Certainly not all, but more than you would believe.
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 4:29:18 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/25/2004 4:47:48 AM EST

Originally Posted By kpel308:
I'd gladly give my left testicle to go back in the Corps.



Semper Fi! I'll go with you!
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