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Posted: 9/15/2004 9:11:57 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 9:20:32 PM EST
What color is her bedroom?

MT
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 9:22:08 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 9:23:03 PM EST
Is she properly potty trained? sometime kids will get their bed a little wet, start feeling uncomfortable and then the crying starts.
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 9:28:55 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/15/2004 9:29:34 PM EST by MT_Pockets]
Red is a high energy color and might make one feel restless in a bedroom.

MT

(yet may be good for newlyweds)
Link Posted: 9/15/2004 11:24:51 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 2:27:29 AM EST
Put a large pillow in bed next to her for a few nights.....she might wake up and "feel" it there and assume all is well. Also, is there a night-light in her room?

At least yours doesn't climb into bed with you at 2:30 a.m.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 2:51:08 AM EST
No suggestions really, just adding my sympathy for you. If you figure it out, let me know.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 4:05:16 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 4:16:26 AM EST

Originally Posted By MrsGloftoe:

Oh she'll climb in bed with us all right, every night if we let her. Otherwise I have to go sit with her in her room until she falls back asleep.



My first post in the womens forum.

MrsGloftoe, my wife feels you pain. Our daughter (2 yrs 8 months) has done the same thing since she was born. She is pretty well potty trained, but still wakes up at least once a night (well.....probably 85% of the time). She either want's her milk, her mommy, or needs to potty. Anymore she usually isn't crying, she just walks into out bedroom and wakes us up. There is no end in sight.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 5:05:48 AM EST
Best advicde I ever got beofre my Daughter was born.

Live your life as you would normally, don't tip toe around, don't whisper and keep the house quite, don't go running to the kid every time she cries. Never let the kid sleep in your bed.

Not sure, but I would assume you have done something to create this routine. At 3 you can give the child some goals and positive reinforcement to stay in bed. Remember, as an adult you don't have to do anything. At 9 years old, my daughter runs my ex-wife. She lost the battle when my daughter was around 3. Sound familiar?

Also, even at a young age these kids are sharp, never drop your guard. They are out to get you!
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 6:31:03 AM EST
Have to agree.

Originally Posted By MT_Pockets:
Red is a high energy color and might make one feel restless in a bedroom.

MT

(yet may be good for newlyweds)

Link Posted: 9/16/2004 6:43:34 AM EST
Have you tried white noise in her bedroom? My 4 year old sleeps with a television (not on a channel, just static) turned really low. He didn't start sleeping through the night until we did this. He would sleep through as a baby as long as we turned his "mommy bear" on whenever he started to squirm. (Mommy bear made womb sounds.) You might also consider cutting all refined flour and sugar from her diet, particualrly within a few hours of bedtime, change the paint color in her room to a soft blue or green, and try to establish a routine (not only for bedtime, but for when she does wake, go in, tell her it's okay, tuck her back in, kiss her, and then leave).

There are white noise machines, but a small fan or a TV or radio tuned to static works just as well. You want to turn it so low that it is barely noticeable. Classical music may work as well. That is what we wound up doing when he was a baby and it spared us turning the mommy bear on 3 times per night. Bach is good for sleeping, but Mozart is WAY too stimulating.

Good luck!
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 6:47:05 AM EST

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:
Have you tried white noise in her bedroom? My 4 year old sleeps with a television (not on a channel, just static) turned really low. He didn't start sleeping through the night until we did this. He would sleep through as a baby as long as we turned his "mommy bear" on whenever he started to squirm. (Mommy bear made womb sounds.) You might also consider cutting all refined flour and sugar from her diet, particualrly within a few hours of bedtime, change the paint color in her room to a soft blue or green, and try to establish a routine (not only for bedtime, but for when she does wake, go in, tell her it's okay, tuck her back in, kiss her, and then leave).

There are white noise machines, but a small fan or a TV or radio tuned to static works just as well. You want to turn it so low that it is barely noticeable. Classical music may work as well. That is what we wound up doing when he was a baby and it spared us turning the mommy bear on 3 times per night. Bach is good for sleeping, but Mozart is WAY too stimulating.

Good luck!



BUT...they are more likely to "need" this white noise as they grow older. I have a friend that HAS to sleep with a fan running....not blowing on her, but just the noise of it. She even took a fan along on her honeymoon a few months ago.
Be careful of this....it could lead to things later.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 6:56:42 AM EST
Look closely at the time. Is it possible that a neighbor slams a car door going to work at 0-dark AM? That happens to me, my neighbor starts slamming crap around at 5AM, heck I can synchronize my clocks by it. White noise will fix this.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 6:58:44 AM EST

Originally Posted By Stoney-Point:

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:
Have you tried white noise in her bedroom? My 4 year old sleeps with a television (not on a channel, just static) turned really low. He didn't start sleeping through the night until we did this. He would sleep through as a baby as long as we turned his "mommy bear" on whenever he started to squirm. (Mommy bear made womb sounds.) You might also consider cutting all refined flour and sugar from her diet, particualrly within a few hours of bedtime, change the paint color in her room to a soft blue or green, and try to establish a routine (not only for bedtime, but for when she does wake, go in, tell her it's okay, tuck her back in, kiss her, and then leave).

There are white noise machines, but a small fan or a TV or radio tuned to static works just as well. You want to turn it so low that it is barely noticeable. Classical music may work as well. That is what we wound up doing when he was a baby and it spared us turning the mommy bear on 3 times per night. Bach is good for sleeping, but Mozart is WAY too stimulating.

Good luck!



BUT...they are more likely to "need" this white noise as they grow older. I have a friend that HAS to sleep with a fan running....not blowing on her, but just the noise of it. She even took a fan along on her honeymoon a few months ago.
Be careful of this....it could lead to things later.




and the problem with this is what, stoney??

/me has a fan in her room
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 7:00:31 AM EST

Originally Posted By Stoney-Point:

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:
Have you tried white noise in her bedroom? My 4 year old sleeps with a television (not on a channel, just static) turned really low. He didn't start sleeping through the night until we did this. He would sleep through as a baby as long as we turned his "mommy bear" on whenever he started to squirm. (Mommy bear made womb sounds.) You might also consider cutting all refined flour and sugar from her diet, particualrly within a few hours of bedtime, change the paint color in her room to a soft blue or green, and try to establish a routine (not only for bedtime, but for when she does wake, go in, tell her it's okay, tuck her back in, kiss her, and then leave).

There are white noise machines, but a small fan or a TV or radio tuned to static works just as well. You want to turn it so low that it is barely noticeable. Classical music may work as well. That is what we wound up doing when he was a baby and it spared us turning the mommy bear on 3 times per night. Bach is good for sleeping, but Mozart is WAY too stimulating.

Good luck!



BUT...they are more likely to "need" this white noise as they grow older. I have a friend that HAS to sleep with a fan running....not blowing on her, but just the noise of it. She even took a fan along on her honeymoon a few months ago.
Be careful of this....it could lead to things later.

You can gradually wean them off of the white noise if need be, or most people will adjust without it. It's really a matter of predictable background noise that masks sudden noises. I'm a light sleeper, so I know white noise helps me, but I can sleep without it.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 7:18:19 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2004 7:18:33 AM EST by Stoney-Point]

Originally Posted By diabolical_chicken:

Originally Posted By Stoney-Point:

Originally Posted By cat_aclysm:
Have you tried white noise in her bedroom? My 4 year old sleeps with a television (not on a channel, just static) turned really low. He didn't start sleeping through the night until we did this. He would sleep through as a baby as long as we turned his "mommy bear" on whenever he started to squirm. (Mommy bear made womb sounds.) You might also consider cutting all refined flour and sugar from her diet, particualrly within a few hours of bedtime, change the paint color in her room to a soft blue or green, and try to establish a routine (not only for bedtime, but for when she does wake, go in, tell her it's okay, tuck her back in, kiss her, and then leave).

There are white noise machines, but a small fan or a TV or radio tuned to static works just as well. You want to turn it so low that it is barely noticeable. Classical music may work as well. That is what we wound up doing when he was a baby and it spared us turning the mommy bear on 3 times per night. Bach is good for sleeping, but Mozart is WAY too stimulating.

Good luck!



BUT...they are more likely to "need" this white noise as they grow older. I have a friend that HAS to sleep with a fan running....not blowing on her, but just the noise of it. She even took a fan along on her honeymoon a few months ago.
Be careful of this....it could lead to things later.




and the problem with this is what, stoney??

/me has a fan in her room



Her husband hates it. He can't sleep well with the fan running, she can't sleep w/o it.

I can't stand noise in the background.
I don't want the quiet sound of my window being slid open (from the outside) masked by white noise.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 8:17:57 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/16/2004 8:20:12 AM EST by MrsGungho]

Originally Posted By Stoney-Point:

and the problem with this is what, stoney??

/me has a fan in her room
Her husband hates it. He can't sleep well with the fan running, she can't sleep w/o it.

I can't stand noise in the background.
I don't want the quiet sound of my window being slid open (from the outside) masked by white noise.




Change the she to he and he to she.. me and hubby... he has to have a fan running, can't sleep without it. Points it at the wall so it doesn't blow on us, but still very disturbing.
The last time we had burglars this spring.. they broke the window so hard on the Tahoe that the glass was on the other side of the vehicle in the carport.. did either of us hear it? NO! Why do you ask, because of "white noise" in the background.. Some nights I don't even hear the baby crying.. my daughter gets up with him.

But with that said, it does do wonders with kids.. just not a good idea to get them attached to it.
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 9:18:03 AM EST
wild turkey 101

Link Posted: 9/16/2004 11:13:37 AM EST
Unisom, and lots of it!

j/k
Link Posted: 9/16/2004 11:21:49 AM EST
More than likely she developed a routine very early one and it will be extremely tough to break. Little ones have a tendency to wake up every few hours because their little minds are always going. It boils down to how we as parents handle it. By now, her waking up is habit and when she cries out she expects Mama to come and sit with her until she falls asleep.

I'm heading back home tomorrow and I'll show this to Mrs. M4arc, she'll be able to explain it better and give you advice on correcting it. Believe me, it won't happen over night (no pun intended).
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