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Posted: 8/11/2011 6:50:52 AM EDT
I have told this story several times over the years on this board. What is different this time is last weekend I met the current owner of this WW II Japanese rifle and he sent me some pictures of it.

When I was in the 2nd grade, our next door neighbor was a WW II vet and he had this Japanese rifle leaning in the corner of his den. He said he killed the Japanese soldier that was carrying the rifle and brought the rifle home. I was friends with his son and was over at their house one afternoon and I asked the dad if I could take the rifle to school for "Show and Tell". I remember he looked at me a little funny, but said it would be fine if my dad said it was OK. I took the rifle home and told my dad the plan and he said it was fine.

The next morning I got on the school bus with the rifle. The bus driver asked what I was doing with a rifle. I explained it was for Show and Tell. The bus driver said OK and that was the end of that.

I arrive at school and carried the rifle into my 2nd grade class. Our teacher Mrs. Cox seemed somewhat concerned that I brought a rifle into class and she left to go get the principal. The principal arrived and inspected the rifle to make sure it wasn't loaded, and he said it would be fine for me to use it in the Show and Tell exercise.

The school day ended and I carried the rifle home on the school bus. No one died. Neither SWAT nor Homeland Security was called to the scene, and my parents did not get investigated by Child Services for endangering their children.

The last time I saw this rifle was around 1964, but I never forgot the details of this event, especially given how things are today with firearms paranoia.

Fast forward to last weekend. I went home to SC to visit my parents. My dad had recently connected via email with the oldest daughter of this WW II vet. She used to babysit us when we were kids. My parents invited her and her husband over for dinner while I was there. It was fun going over all the old memories, and of course I brought up the Japanese rifle story. I was surprised to learn that when the Vet died, he left the rifle to his daughter, who is now in her late 50's. Her husband told me he still had the rifle and it was hanging over their fireplace. I asked if he would email me some pictures of the rifle and he said he would. I just received the pictures this morning.

Does anyone know what model rifle it is or anything else about it. Sorry about the lack of details in the pics, this is all he sent.





Link Posted: 8/11/2011 6:53:32 AM EDT
[#1]
Very cool story. Times were different back then.

The rifle is a Type 99 "Arisaka".
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 6:54:06 AM EDT
[#2]
I don't know anything about the rifle, but in relation to your story:  a guy I went to high school with once chased the principal down in the parking lot with a (broken) air rifle to ask him if it was okay to use in some project for physics class.  The principal took it surprisingly well.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 6:55:05 AM EDT
[#3]
Early Type 99?
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 6:56:42 AM EDT
[#4]
Yep Arisaka.  Cool story. Too bad we are so far away from that today.

ETA: Does it still have the Chrysanthemum on top of the receiver? It should.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 6:58:38 AM EDT
[#5]
Quoted:
Early Type 99?


Yes, it's going to be a relatively early rifle, as it originally had the aircraft sights (which may still be there) and the monopod (which is gone).
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 7:00:51 AM EDT
[#6]
I brought the same model rifle to middle school around 1996 for a historical show and tell.  My grandpa brought it back after WWII.  My dad did clear it with the principal first.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 7:01:44 AM EDT
[#7]
Thank you for sharing.  
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 7:05:05 AM EDT
[#8]
Cool story, bro. No, really.



Also, that is a beautiful fireplace/mantle.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 7:05:08 AM EDT
[#9]
I took a .22 to school in the late 80's. My comp math teacher was a FFL and gunsmith. I had taken the .22 a bit farther apart than i could get back together so he fixed it right up.


Link Posted: 8/11/2011 7:16:24 AM EDT
[#10]
Great story.



You could tell her that the "face" jug sitting on their hearth (if it's not a reproduction) is/could be worth some serious cash (as in thousands) and should be moved to a safer place after being appraised.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 7:17:19 AM EDT
[#11]
Nice story!

I have a similar story to tell.  Although, mine was much more recent.

I was in 9th grade.  My English teacher announced that we all had to do a small speech in front of the class, to explain a process/demonstration.  Well, I went home and thought about it and it finally hit me - "How to Clean a Shotgun".  I ran it by my parents and received their permission to take my shotgun to school, providing my teacher was ok with it.

The next day, I walked into English class & talked to a few buddies about their speeches.  One was going to do a "How to make grilled cheese".    After class, I walked up to Miss Taylor and told her about my idea for my speech.  She was cool with it but told me I should ask Mr. Patterson (principal) for his permission prior to bringing my gun to school.  So, I marched up to his office.  After explaining the project to Mr. Patterson, he said "fine, but don't bring any ammunition with you" and "when you get here in the morning, please lock it up in your locker and don't get it out until it is time for your English class".  

A few days later it was my turn to do my speech.  I walked the 1/8" mile to my school bus stop w/ my Ithaca Model 37 slung over my shoulder.  When Georgia (my bus driver) pulled up to pick me and 7 or 8 other students up, she smiled and asked me why I was bringing my shotgun to school.  I told her & she drove on.  I got to school that morning and walked through the halls of my school carrying my cleaning supplies, backpack and my shotgun.  I locked it up in my locker, right in front of my math teacher.  No comment (he was a hunter & we always shared stories).  I sat through a few classes that morning, totally excited to do my speech.  I knew I would get a great grade on it!  Time for English class arrived & I stopped by my locker on the way to pick up my shotgun.  I walked to class and sat down with my shotgun, awaiting my turn.  Miss Taylor called my name & I walked up front.  I gave one heck of presentation on cleaning a shotgun and returned to my seat.  After class, I returned my shotgun to my locker and moved on with my day.  That afternoon I, once again, boarded the school bus with my shotgun and rode home.

Nobody got shot, my parents weren't thrown in the clink, they weren't on the front page of Drudge, etc.  I recieved a good grade for my speech which was my main goal.

The sad thing about this story - it was only 1993 when I gave the speech.  At my high school, my buddies and I routinely brought our guns to school so we could go hunting afterwards.  Although, we did usually leave them in someones car during school hours.  Heck, I remember quite a few guys w/ guns in gun racks on school property.  We shot bows during gym class and were encouraged to bring our own so there were more bows to go around!

The good ol days, they're gone.  
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 7:45:45 AM EDT
[#12]
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 8:09:40 AM EDT
[#13]
Quoted:
Nice story!

I have a similar story to tell.  Although, mine was much more recent.

I was in 9th grade.  My English teacher announced that we all had to do a small speech in front of the class, to explain a process/demonstration.  Well, I went home and thought about it and it finally hit me - "How to Clean a Shotgun".  I ran it by my parents and received their permission to take my shotgun to school, providing my teacher was ok with it.

The next day, I walked into English class & talked to a few buddies about their speeches.  One was going to do a "How to make grilled cheese".    After class, I walked up to Miss Taylor and told her about my idea for my speech.  She was cool with it but told me I should ask Mr. Patterson (principal) for his permission prior to bringing my gun to school.  So, I marched up to his office.  After explaining the project to Mr. Patterson, he said "fine, but don't bring any ammunition with you" and "when you get here in the morning, please lock it up in your locker and don't get it out until it is time for your English class".  

A few days later it was my turn to do my speech.  I walked the 1/8" mile to my school bus stop w/ my Ithaca Model 37 slung over my shoulder.  When Georgia (my bus driver) pulled up to pick me and 7 or 8 other students up, she smiled and asked me why I was bringing my shotgun to school.  I told her & she drove on.  I got to school that morning and walked through the halls of my school carrying my cleaning supplies, backpack and my shotgun.  I locked it up in my locker, right in front of my math teacher.  No comment (he was a hunter & we always shared stories).  I sat through a few classes that morning, totally excited to do my speech.  I knew I would get a great grade on it!  Time for English class arrived & I stopped by my locker on the way to pick up my shotgun.  I walked to class and sat down with my shotgun, awaiting my turn.  Miss Taylor called my name & I walked up front.  I gave one heck of presentation on cleaning a shotgun and returned to my seat.  After class, I returned my shotgun to my locker and moved on with my day.  That afternoon I, once again, boarded the school bus with my shotgun and rode home.

Nobody got shot, my parents weren't thrown in the clink, they weren't on the front page of Drudge, etc.  I recieved a good grade for my speech which was my main goal.

The sad thing about this story - it was only 1993 when I gave the speech.  At my high school, my buddies and I routinely brought our guns to school so we could go hunting afterwards.  Although, we did usually leave them in someones car during school hours.  Heck, I remember quite a few guys w/ guns in gun racks on school property.  We shot bows during gym class and were encouraged to bring our own so there were more bows to go around!

The good ol days, they're gone.  


I'm going to take a wild bet and say that you can still do it at a private school.

Growing up homeschooled, no one cared if anyone brought a gun or guns to a co-op meeting, as it was pretty common for school projects. Not EVERYONE is a complete wimp , just those in public education ;)
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 8:13:56 AM EDT
[#14]
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 8:15:54 AM EDT
[#15]
I took an AR-15 rifle to school and gave a speech on how to dissemble, maintain, and reassemble it.  This was at university, in 2007.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 8:28:36 AM EDT
[#16]
The sword at the bottom is WWll Japanese also,cavalry I believe.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 8:38:57 AM EDT
[#17]
In early high school in 83 or 84 I took a Ky long rifle to school and shot off some black powder out side for a history class. and my brother had a S&W 22LR and marlin 39A in his locker for over a month for a school play.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 8:41:33 AM EDT
[#18]
Took a sword from the 1812 war to 3rd grade show and tell.   Had shotgun shells in my pocket from hunting in 4th grade, took them to my teacher, she have them back at 3:10   lol.    I carried a knife from grade 4 to graduation. My school always allowed knives.   (Graduated 2001)   Thank God for private school.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 8:45:49 AM EDT
[#19]
I saw lots of guns in show and tell when I was a kid.  I suppose there are still some rural schools where this occurs.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 9:05:00 AM EDT
[#20]
Neat face jugs in the picture.

Those from the Seagrove area of NC?
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 9:12:48 AM EDT
[#21]
I used to take a .22 on the bus and keep it in my locker all day, then go rabbit hunting after school with the shop teacher. Once the bus driver loaned me a 16 gauge. And that was in New York state.

Quoted:
Neat face jugs in the picture...


EB has a Lanier Meaders she inherited from her mother.

Link Posted: 8/11/2011 9:23:43 AM EDT
[#22]
Use to be rifle clubs in school and no one cared about us carrying our .22 around.
Try that now.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 9:23:47 AM EDT
[#23]
Quoted:
I used to take a .22 on the bus and keep it in my locker all day, then go rabbit hunting after school with the shop teacher. Once the bus driver loaned me a 16 gauge. And that was in New York state.

Quoted:
Neat face jugs in the picture...


EB has a Lanier Meaders she inherited from her mother.



I don't mean to hijack away from the OPs post but I really enjoy that style of pottery.  Some face jugs are downright scary looking.  It makes sense they stored "spirits" in them.

Good pottery is art you can actually use.  I use a lot of the pottery I picked up in Seagrove, NC.  



Link Posted: 8/11/2011 9:43:41 AM EDT
[#24]
Quoted:
The sword at the bottom is WWll Japanese also,cavalry I believe.



His daughter said the WW II vet also brought back a Japanese sword that she inherited. That must be it in the picture.

Link Posted: 8/11/2011 9:53:18 AM EDT
[#25]
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 9:53:54 AM EDT
[#26]
Very cool story bro. I would love to have seen a rifle being shown during show 'n tell.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:11:50 AM EDT
[#27]
The pistol below the mantel looks like Stevens Model 35 with a 10" barrel. These are amazingly accurate, and worth a good chunk of change, too.

If it's in excellent condition, it could be worth somewhere in the vicinity of $800. If it was a Pre-NFA model (prior to 1934) in .410, it would be worth
considerably more. Might want to make sure your friends have good pics/documentation on these for their insurance records.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:28:15 AM EDT
[#28]
Good story. Different times, different place.

When I was in high school, we had an 22LR indoor rifle range for the ROTC.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:28:21 AM EDT
[#29]
Here is a link for the Type 2 Arisaka, the paratroop version. It has some information relevant to the Type99, as well as some information on the Type 30 bayonet.

The action is very stout and should be GTG if in decent condition. You can find the brass from time to time. Graf's stocks Privi periodically. Norma has made it as well.

You can also form the 7.7Jap brass from 30-06.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:30:52 AM EDT
[#30]
Quoted:
.
.
I arrive at school and carried the rifle into my 2nd grade class. Our teacher Mrs. Cox seemed somewhat concerned that I brought a rifle into class and she left to go get the principal. The principal arrived and inspected the rifle to make sure it wasn't loaded...
.
.
I think today, the principal wouldn't even know how to tell if a gun is loaded or not.

Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:35:26 AM EDT
[#31]



Quoted:


Yep Arisaka.  Cool story. Too bad we are so far away from that today.



ETA: Does it still have the Chrysanthemum on top of the receiver? It should.


Thats what I was wondering.

 
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:42:05 AM EDT
[#32]
When I was in high school I got to bring my muzzle loader and its bayonet to school for a presentation I was making on the Civil War.  I also started a gun club and one of the parents, who is an NRA certified instructor, brought firearms for a class sponsored by the club about firearm safety to use for demonstrations.  We also had a WWI reenactor come in for a demonstration sponsored by a history teacher and he brought a Mauser rifle and Mauser pistol and passed them around as part of the demonstration.  My club also got permission to take a picture for the yearbook on campus with our firearms but the photographer cancelled and we weren't able to get a picture in time for the yearbook.    My school was rather tolerant compared to other schools, it seems; this was not that long ago, either.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:42:54 AM EDT
[#33]
I took a old rusted Remington Rolling Block to school when I was in the 4th grade for show and tell. I felt cool waiting in the pickup line with a rifle over my shoulder.

This was about 20 years ago in MD btw.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:46:31 AM EDT
[#34]
quite the shame common sense along with the 2nd Amendment is being indoctrinated out of our youth.



Looks like that Type 99 went to a good home, didn't wind up in the furnace after a gun buy-back, or left in a dank cellar to rust away.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:49:30 AM EDT
[#35]
Quoted:
A similar story also...

High school U.S. History class, 1980.  I mentioned a rifle to my teacher that my brother in law inherited from his WW 11 veteran father.  

Lois


Didn't know we've had 11 world wars
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:49:39 AM EDT
[#36]




Quoted:

The pistol below the mantel looks like Stevens Model 35 with a 10" barrel. These are amazingly accurate, and worth a good chunk of change, too.



If it's in excellent condition, it could be worth somewhere in the vicinity of $800. If it was a Pre-NFA model (prior to 1934) in .410, it would be worth

considerably more. Might want to make sure your friends have good pics/documentation on these for their insurance records.




Didn't even notice the Stevens tip-up. Grandpa had the one with the wire stock.



Also just noticed someone likes to carve. Other grandpa had all kinds of the wooden chains and caged balls that the steel mill had payed him lots of money to carve.
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:53:57 AM EDT
[#37]
Hey, I have one of those!
Link Posted: 8/11/2011 10:57:26 AM EDT
[#38]
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