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Posted: 8/3/2007 11:55:43 AM EST
I had a slow leak i one of my tires.  It would take about two weeks for it to get down to approximately 25psi and the low tire pressure warning would come on.
I had the tire fixed (nail).  Now I get the "service tire monitor" message every time I start the car.  Is this something that I can reset, or did Jimmy-Joe-Bob at the discount tire shack screw something up?
Anyone familiar with that particular code?  I haven't had any luck with internet searches.
Any help is appreciated.

Link Posted: 8/3/2007 12:02:23 PM EST
Dying battery in the sensor?
Link Posted: 8/3/2007 12:32:05 PM EST
since the wheel was probably removed from the vehicle to do the repair, it's basically lost it's sync from that sensor to the car.

It'll take a visit to your local GM dealer to get it cleared off, should run about $15 and 10 minutes to get it taken care of.
Link Posted: 8/3/2007 3:59:23 PM EST
Mine is doing the exact same thing. I know the system aill tell you when your oil is do for a change. There is a way to clear that code, it's in the owner's manual.
I haven't tried it yet, but I would assume it will clear the tire code as well.

My wife is out or I would look in the OM and try it and let you know. If she gets back soon I'll try it.
Link Posted: 8/3/2007 4:41:07 PM EST
You can play with the steering wheel and reset the oil life.  If you have all those fancy buttons on there, anyway!  I figured that one out after a few minutes.  This message seems to be more permanent, like you actually have to know what you are doing.

I got a different "low tire pressure" message when it would get low.  Now I just get the service tire message.  I hope nothing was broken.  I guess I don't understand how that sensor works...  
Link Posted: 8/3/2007 4:42:32 PM EST

Quoted:


Before that, try stopping by a Autozone store. They will run the code machine and clear it for you for free.

At least here locally they still do.

Where in Indiana are you? My Dad has one of the GM OBDII code readers.


I'll try that!  Thanks.  

I live in Indianapolis...
Link Posted: 8/3/2007 5:33:48 PM EST

Quoted:

Quoted:


Before that, try stopping by a Autozone store. They will run the code machine and clear it for you for free.

At least here locally they still do.

Where in Indiana are you? My Dad has one of the GM OBDII code readers.


I'll try that!  Thanks.  

I live in Indianapolis...


Not a problem...I had asked where you were in Indiana, cause if you were close by, I'd hop on the bike and scoot over with my Dad's OBDII canner and reset your codes.

Autozone should do it, and if they stopped doing it, I think Advanced does it too.
Link Posted: 8/3/2007 7:15:04 PM EST

Quoted:
You can play with the steering wheel and reset the oil life.  If you have all those fancy buttons on there, anyway!  I figured that one out after a few minutes.  This message seems to be more permanent, like you actually have to know what you are doing.

I got a different "low tire pressure" message when it would get low.  Now I just get the service tire message.  I hope nothing was broken.  I guess I don't understand how that sensor works...  


I had to re read your OP. I didn't notice you actually got a second and different warning.
I was checking and adding air as needed, but the warning stayed on. Today I put the spare on but didn't get a chance to take the tire to the shop.
A shop that I have never used before, pulled a nail out and plugged the tire but it kept leaking down over about a week, this was a few weeks ago.
I'm gonna have my reg. tire guy look at it, and see if it needs to be patched in more than one spot or replaced.
Now I'm curious if I'll get this message when they put the reg tire back on.

Please update when you get it figured out.
TKS Treeman
Link Posted: 8/3/2007 9:51:58 PM EST
We used to have a 2003 silverado with no buttons on the steering wheel. Put the key to ignition but dont start and push the gas pedal down a few times and that stuff resets. Maybe try that?
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 2:32:56 AM EST
Stepping on the gas pedal resets the change oil message. Code readers will not access the body control module that reads the tire pressure monitors, in fact most aftermarket scanners will not. You will the GM scanner which is a Tech 2 to see what is going on.

The tire monitoring system should reset after the leak is repaired and you drive the vehicle over 5 mph for a minute. If it says 'service tire monitor system' something is broken, not just low on air.

If you do not know what your doing working on these nwer cars and have the right tools, just give it up and pay people who are really trained on working on your car to fix it right, it is cheaper in the long run.

All these chain store auto parts stores are pure crap, my dog is smart then the retards working there.
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 5:09:44 AM EST
read your owners manual
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 6:31:04 AM EST
It just needs to be re-set.
All TPM systems work the same way, but the re-set procedures are different.
The info should be in the owners manual, and you should be able to do it yourself.
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 7:26:34 AM EST
height=8
Quoted:
The tire monitoring system should reset after the leak is repaired and you drive the vehicle over 5 mph for a minute. If it says 'service tire monitor system' something is broken, not just low on air.


not on all vehicles

on the like 2001-2006 chevy anf gmc vehicles they make it a pain in the ass.  you have to press in the emergency brake, turn the key to the on position and then turn you lights on and off till the vehicle honks.  then starting on the driver front tire let the air out of the tire for 10 sec or the vehicle honks do this for all 4 tires and then put 35 psi in all tires and it should reset.


of if you are to lazy to do it take it to your local discount tire co. (not a mom and pop shop) and they will do it for free.
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 10:27:38 AM EST
I looked up the info for you on SI ( GM factory info) for you..here's how to rest your tire monitor.


The TPM sensor matching process is outlined below:

Set the Parking brake.
Turn the ignition switch to RUN with the engine off.
Turn the exterior lamp switch from "Off" to "On" four times within 3 seconds. A double horn chirp will sound and the TPM low tire warning light will begin to flash. The double horn chirp and flashing TPM warning light indicate that the TPM matching process has started. The TPM warning light should continue flashing throughout the matching procedure. The SERVICE TIRE MONITOR message will be displayed on the Driver Information Center (DIC).
Start with the left (driver's side) front tire.
Remove the valve cap from the valve cap stem. Activate the TPM sensor by increasing or decreasing the tire's air pressure for 10 seconds, then stop and listen for a single horn chirp. The single horn chirp should sound within 15 seconds, confirming that the sensor identification code has been matched to this tire and wheel position. If you do not hear the confirming single horn chirp, you will need to start over with step number one. To let air-pressure out of a tire you can use the pointy end of the valve cap, a pencil-style air pressure gage or a key.
Proceed to the right (passenger's side) front tire, and repeat the procedure in step 5.
Proceed to the right (passenger's side) rear tire, and repeat the procedure in step 5.
Proceed to the left (driver's side) rear tire, and repeat the procedure in step 5.
After hearing the confirming horn chirp for the left rear tire, check to see if the TPM warning light is still flashing. If yes, turn the ignition switch to OFF.
Set all four tires to the recommended air pressure level as indicated on the Certification/Tire label or the Tire and Loading Information label.
Put the valve caps back on the valve stems

The spare tire does not have a TPM sensor. If you replace one of the road tires with the spare, the CHECK TIRE PRESSURE message will be displayed on the DIC screen. This message should go off once you re-install the road tire containing the TPM sensor. The SVC TIRE MONITOR message is displayed when the TPM system is malfunctioning. One or more missing or inoperable TPM sensors will cause the service tire monitor message to be displayed. See your dealer for service
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 11:53:31 AM EST

Quoted:
I looked up the info for you on SI ( GM factory info) for you..here's how to rest your tire monitor.


The TPM sensor matching process is outlined below:

Set the Parking brake.
Turn the ignition switch to RUN with the engine off.
Turn the exterior lamp switch from "Off" to "On" four times within 3 seconds. A double horn chirp will sound and the TPM low tire warning light will begin to flash. The double horn chirp and flashing TPM warning light indicate that the TPM matching process has started. The TPM warning light should continue flashing throughout the matching procedure. The SERVICE TIRE MONITOR message will be displayed on the Driver Information Center (DIC).
Start with the left (driver's side) front tire.
Remove the valve cap from the valve cap stem. Activate the TPM sensor by increasing or decreasing the tire's air pressure for 10 seconds, then stop and listen for a single horn chirp. The single horn chirp should sound within 15 seconds, confirming that the sensor identification code has been matched to this tire and wheel position. If you do not hear the confirming single horn chirp, you will need to start over with step number one. To let air-pressure out of a tire you can use the pointy end of the valve cap, a pencil-style air pressure gage or a key.
Proceed to the right (passenger's side) front tire, and repeat the procedure in step 5.
Proceed to the right (passenger's side) rear tire, and repeat the procedure in step 5.
Proceed to the left (driver's side) rear tire, and repeat the procedure in step 5.
After hearing the confirming horn chirp for the left rear tire, check to see if the TPM warning light is still flashing. If yes, turn the ignition switch to OFF.
Set all four tires to the recommended air pressure level as indicated on the Certification/Tire label or the Tire and Loading Information label.
Put the valve caps back on the valve stems

The spare tire does not have a TPM sensor. If you replace one of the road tires with the spare, the CHECK TIRE PRESSURE message will be displayed on the DIC screen. This message should go off once you re-install the road tire containing the TPM sensor. The SVC TIRE MONITOR message is displayed when the TPM system is malfunctioning. One or more missing or inoperable TPM sensors will cause the service tire monitor message to be displayed. See your dealer for service



Not trying to be a smart ass, but are you being serious?

If so, thanks for the help, my situation is diffrent from efpeter's, but I am riding on a spare, and might have to do this once I put the reg tire back on.

I saw the post above yours, and said to my self "No F'n way", and imagined someone laughing their ass off thinking somebody would actually do that.

When you posted the same thing, it blew my mind. All that over, using a spare, or low AP.

If you guys are making this up, it's funny as hell.

Are you making this up
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 1:16:53 PM EST
unfortunately no we are not making it up.  i work for discount tire co.  and that is the way you have to do it.
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 1:58:11 PM EST
TPM is an absolute pain in the ass.  

To make matters worse the manufacturer whose cars I service recently decided to make it incredibly difficult to warranty any of those parts.  Basically if anything goes wrong, its a customer pay job until proven otherwise.  

They assume its always the fault of a person mounting/dismounting the tires that damages the sensor(s).

We are currently up to system number 4 or 5, none of the sensors are interchangeable, all the systems work in different ways, and its a damn nightmare to figure out what you are working with.... to top it off, european and american sensors operate on different frequencies, and they have been known to mislabel and incorrectly package replacement parts, as well as install the wrong stuff at the factory.

I HATE TPM.
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 5:59:48 PM EST
Link Posted: 8/4/2007 11:28:53 PM EST
by 2008 it is required on all vehicles i believe
Link Posted: 8/5/2007 3:35:11 AM EST
The spare on the 04 Tahoe does not have a sensor in it, but some cars do like Toyota, not really a bad idea.

The system the 07 and 08's use is much better than the earlier systems most rest automaticly or just have a button under the dash like some Toyotas.

I'm amazed how people spend 20k plus on a new car or truck and never read the owner's manual then bring cars in for 'warrenty' problems that are owner error.

The info I posted on how to reset the monitor is right from the GM Service Information website, fixing cars is no longer a job for the kadokers with a $99.00 Craftsman tool kit. Tell Autozone to shove there 'free code pulling' up their asses.
Link Posted: 8/5/2007 3:42:02 AM EST

Quoted:
I looked up the info for you on SI ( GM factory info) for you..here's how to rest your tire monitor.


The TPM sensor matching process is outlined below:

...........



Awesome!  I just need time to do it.   Thanks for taking the time to look it up.
Link Posted: 8/5/2007 5:24:56 AM EST
Link Posted: 8/5/2007 10:11:34 AM EST

Quoted:
I looked up the info for you on SI ( GM factory info) for you..here's how to rest your tire monitor.

[Rube Goldberg style reset procedure snipped]



You've got to be shitting us.  
Link Posted: 8/5/2007 5:53:47 PM EST
On my 07 Tacoma I have to press a little button for 3 seconds to reset my TPMS.
Maybe some GM engineer didn't get any for a while and dreamed up that procedure because he hates the world.   Bwahahha.

TYCOM

Link Posted: 8/5/2007 7:14:50 PM EST
The new 06 and up is just to simply drive the car after repairing the tire, some of the earlier stuff requires a bit more work.
Link Posted: 8/6/2007 11:28:13 AM EST
On my Vette you reset the TPS with a big ass magnet....or the proper tool from GM.

Of course my model year, 2000, has the expensive sensors ($130each) that don't interchange with other years that are cheaper. I bought a set of dead sensors for $50 and replaced the batteries in them. It wasn't that hard either, just dig out the potting material and unsolder the old batteries and solder in the new ones. I got the info from the Corvette forum.

Whem mine go south, I have a set ready to swap in. I'll replace the batteries in them and sell them for a net loss of zero.

Me? I like the system.
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