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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/23/2005 11:19:58 AM EDT
Ohio Ordnance Works is selling good condition 1919 kits for $299.

Does anyone know what their 'good' condition kits are like? By my calculations, I'll be able to build it for between $650-$700 if I look for deals. I'll have several AK builds under my belt by then...

So, how do-able is this? And is that a decent kit? I know that some companies' definition of 'good condition' means that it is 80% new, and other companies mean that you can almost see rifling in the sewer pipe bores. What's the benchmark for OOW kits?

Many thanks in advance.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 11:21:30 AM EDT
Maybe you should ask here: www.1919a4.com/
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 11:32:09 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
Maybe you should ask here: www.1919a4.com/



I tried, I signed up last weekend and still haven't been approved to post yet. I just sent another email today.

Link Posted: 9/23/2005 11:34:19 AM EDT

Originally Posted By DDiggler:

Originally Posted By DzlBenz:
Maybe you should ask here: www.1919a4.com/



I tried, I signed up last weekend and still haven't been approved to post yet. I just sent another email today.


Well, that stinks. There was another ARFCOM guy who put one together within the last 6 months or so, and I think he got almost all his info from 191a4.com. I've looked into it a little bit, and it's high on my list of projects to pursue when the money is available.

Are you going .30-06 or .308?
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 11:41:39 AM EDT
I think I'll just stay with .308... most of the surplus ammo for the '06 seems to be corrosive, and I'd just as soon go with the smaller round. If I was actually planning on using it for anything more than occassional plinking, I'd think about the bigger round but I don't really see an advantage to it.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 11:45:10 AM EDT
That would be my preference as well. I think the other guy also prefers the pistol grip and finger trigger to the butterfly paddles, interestingly enough. I'd have to go with the paddles, just because they look cool. I mean, c'mon. Nobody owns a 1919 for any practical purpose!
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 11:51:26 AM EDT
And the crank. You gotta get a crank for it.

Even though I could only afford to turn it 10 times or so...
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 11:58:56 AM EDT
tag, I want one too.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 12:01:25 PM EDT
Everything that been said over at 1919a4.com has been positive about these kits. Mostly just finish wear. Most people blast and re-park, so the finish is not a big deal. Mechanically they are suppose to be just fine.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 12:04:32 PM EDT
I built mine last year from an Izzy parts kit and a RF 80% side plate.



Proper riveting is the hardest part. The rest of the build is easy. Machining the internals takes effort and a mill but there are plenty of places that will machine them for you it isn't worth the hassle. I did my own just because I wanted to do as much of the build myself as possible.







Link Posted: 9/23/2005 12:04:49 PM EDT
Crank is the only way to go.
(Unless you can legally own and afford a true full auto version)

Link Posted: 9/23/2005 12:06:13 PM EDT
I'm going to a gun show tomorrow, and I'm thinking about selling/trading a 1911 Compact; maybe for a kit. But I don't remember seeing kits for that cheap, maybe I'll need to wait and order it.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 12:07:55 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/23/2005 12:09:02 PM EDT by DDiggler]
ShackleMeNot,

What is hard about the riveting? Is it much harder to do than AK rivets?

ETA: I ALMOST wish I had a daughter, instead of two sons. A 1919 would be the perfect gun to be cleaning in the living room when the new boyfriend comes to pick up his date!
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 12:22:52 PM EDT
ATF now says that you don't have to weld them anymore either. So building is that much less of a pain.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 2:48:25 PM EDT

Originally Posted By DDiggler:
ShackleMeNot,

What is hard about the riveting? Is it much harder to do than AK rivets?

ETA: I ALMOST wish I had a daughter, instead of two sons. A 1919 would be the perfect gun to be cleaning in the living room when the new boyfriend comes to pick up his date!



I don't have a press so I did them cold by hand. It was A LOT of pounding. You also need to support the back of the rivet so some sort of bucking bar is necessary.

It's not THAT hard to do but it is a pain.

My 1919 was my most fun project so far. Building guns is a rewarding hobby.

bookertbab,
Do you have a link to the ATF letter that states that the no longer have to be welded?
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:34:11 PM EDT
If you get one of those $299 kits let us know how good they are. I am interested in building one as well.
Link Posted: 9/23/2005 3:59:27 PM EDT

Originally Posted By ShackleMeNot:

bookertbab,
Do you have a link to the ATF letter that states that the no longer have to be welded?



The letter from the ATF is posted on 1919a4.com
Link Posted: 9/25/2005 9:52:20 AM EDT
Here's my ohio gun...






The only difference you'll find between the good condition kits are the finish will be more worn on the goods, and the triunion may show more wear.

You'll refinish the gun when your done anyway so the finish shouldnt matter...and a 14 dollar triunion protector will cure that problem.

My advice, if you dont have a belt fed yet......get one. Sell your kidneys if you have to! You've never laughed so hard until you've gone through a 2oo round belt, your shoes are covered in brass, your hands are covered in oil, and the whole range has come to you to say "mind if I shoot that?"

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