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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 12/17/2003 5:54:42 AM EDT


How far have we come?
Link Posted: 12/17/2003 6:14:06 AM EDT
Don't forget to thank Nikola Tesla.
Link Posted: 12/17/2003 6:17:04 AM EDT
Originally Posted By peekay: Don't forget to thank Nikola Tesla.
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Hey, didn't he have a band back in the late 1980's?
Link Posted: 12/17/2003 6:25:06 AM EDT
Ah,...the two German inventions, the internal combustion engine and the fixed-wing plane cobbled together and made a new and better thing by Americans. If that isn't the essence of the relationship between Germany and America, I don't know /what/ is.
Link Posted: 12/17/2003 6:25:42 AM EDT
Originally Posted By sloth:
Originally Posted By peekay: Don't forget to thank Nikola Tesla.
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Hey, didn't he have a band back in the late 1980's?
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Yep. Billy Sheehan played bass for him. But seriously, what if Tesla's ideas had all been brought into the mainstream? I think much of today's technology would seem pretty crude. After all, our means of transporting ourselves from point A to point B is derived from violent chemical explosion (whether you're in your car or the space shuttle).
Link Posted: 12/17/2003 6:44:08 AM EDT
Georgia PBS (I know; groan) had a special about The Brothers a few nights ago. I think the producers did a good job of putting their accomplishment into proper perspective. The Brothers didn't invent heavier-than-air flight--not at all, they invented nearly nothing on the Flyer, but they did vastly improve things: the air-foil was already known to produce lift and several inventors had experimented with them. The Brothers improved tha airfoil through valid and repeatable experimentation, and they vastly improved the propeller. Other inventors were trying to get a craft to fly by invisioning it just flying and moving through the air--[b]control[/b] of the craft would be conquered later on. The Brothers realized that [b]control[/b] [i]was[/i] the problem, not getting the craft to have enough lift. What The Brothers invented was [i]control[/i] of an aircraft. Had thrust not been a problem with other inventors, other craft probably would have flown first if controllable--they didn't realize that their crafts became uncontrollable the very moment they started to lift, but The Brothers did. It's a very interesting story. They get credit for inventing the airplane, when they should get credit for inventing aircraft control--ironically, aircraft control is orders of magnitude more difficult to solve that creating an air-lifting craft, but the public doesn't appreciate that, so...
Link Posted: 12/17/2003 7:12:42 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/17/2003 7:13:45 AM EDT by raven]
MY GOD! WHAT HAVE WE BECOME?!?!?! George Monbiot sees things that normal people just can’t see. And he writes things that normal people just can’t be bothered reading, like his latest column, which identifies flight as the Great Evil of our time: [i]At Kitty Hawk, George Bush will deliver a eulogy to aviation, while a number of men with more money than sense will seek to recreate the Wrights' first flight. Well, they can keep their anniversary. Tomorrow should be a day of international mourning. December 17 2003 is the centenary of the world's most effective killing machine.[/i] Just look at the sinister apparatus. Pity the victims fed through that double-bladed mincing device. The number on its side? Confirmed kills. [img]http://www-personal.engin.umich.edu/~bbeal/cessna.jpg[/img] Note that the machine must be tied down to keep its evil in check. [url]http://timblair.spleenville.com/archives/005406.php[/url]
Link Posted: 12/17/2003 7:53:00 AM EDT
Oh, the horror! "Airplanes are interesting toys, but they have no military value." - Marshal Ferdinand Foch
Link Posted: 12/17/2003 7:58:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Kar98: Ah,...the two German inventions, the internal combustion engine and the fixed-wing plane cobbled together and made a new and better thing by Americans. If that isn't the essence of the relationship between Germany and America, I don't know /what/ is.
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[img]http://www.trumanlibrary.org/museum/flash/hindenburg.jpg[/img] [lol]......[}:D]
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