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Posted: 9/2/2015 9:51:38 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/2/2015 10:01:10 AM EDT by Blu3Ridge]
I'm starting to furnish an attached workshop into my 4 stall pole barn garage, and am in needing of power tool recommendations.  Budget is about 18k.

Items on the list include:
Table (cabinet) saw
Miter saw
Jointer
Planer
Drill press
Ban saw
Lathe
Dust system
ETA: Router table

Projects include basically everything you'd see on an episode of the New Yankee Confederate Workshop.

Link Posted: 9/2/2015 9:57:17 AM EDT
What a fun thing to be doing. I've had really good luck with Dewalt, Hitachi, Bosch, and Porter Cable.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 10:02:31 AM EDT
What about Powermatic, Jet, Sawstop, Laguna, or Delta?
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 10:09:24 AM EDT
If you have $18K to spend I would seriously consider getting some Festool items like a few sanders with a dust extractor, router, jigsaw and plunge saw.  Top quality tools and the best part is the dust collection.  You may not realize it but breathing in wood dust can cause major issues long term.  In my younger years I didn't understand this and developed some major allergy and breathing issues due to dust.  Sinus infections all the time, allergies running nose like Niagra Falls.  Had some test done and my reaction to trees and pollen was off the charts.  Started using Festool and then a mid-size dust collector for the jointer and table saw.  Also went on allergy shots and now it is 1000 times better.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 10:11:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/2/2015 10:16:07 AM EDT by Codyboy]
I have a 3 hp unisaw and it has plenty of power. If I were going to build a lot of stuff I would get at least a 5 hp. Not sure how they're made today but mine is over 15 years old and has steel wheels.
I have a jet 14 in enclosed cabinet bandsaw that's ok and does what I need it for.
If doing any resawing get a bigger one.

Other small power tools are a mix of Dewalt , porter cable etc.

Eta

Forgot about my pc 3 hp router that I cabinet mounted permanently.  Plenty of power for making doors or whatever.
However I would have a dedicated shaper if I had the money and was using it all the time.

I would read reviews on whatever you want to buy / need and then make a decision .
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 10:14:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/2/2015 10:15:14 AM EDT by jmarkma]
While the owner is a dickbag I'd consider a Sawstop table saw, Bosch miter saw, old Powermatic/Delta Band saw drill press and lathe.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 10:17:16 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/2/2015 10:21:28 AM EDT by Yirmeyahu]
I am a hobbyist woodworker and have my 2 car garage set up as a workshop.  

My first recommendation is to build your dust collection system the best that you can afford. Visit Bill Pentz website and read up on it.    Your respiratory system will thank you.  Do NOT skimp in this area.

Powermatic is pretty much the defecto affordable woodworking tool manufacturer (although you will find many of the machines are made in the same factory.. the higher cost comes with better machining and features).

If budget allows, Festool is pretty much king (Kapex miter saw - yes!)

There are so many different types of tools and models that you can get lost.

I recommend researching dust collection and a good quality cabinet saw with good dust collection, side feed, and outfeed tables first.  Building these is also a possibility.  You can do most operations with a good table saw.

A jointer/planer generally go hand in hand for milling wood.

If you have any specific questions, you can IM me.

EDIT:  CLAMPS!  Good quality clamps.  You can never ever have too many.  I used to like the Jet Parallel clamps, but they seem to have gone down in quality as of late.  You can rarely go wrong with Bessey Revos.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 10:18:05 AM EDT
SNAPON...
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 10:31:45 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tnburban:
If you have $18K to spend I would seriously consider getting some Festool items like a few sanders with a dust extractor, router, jigsaw and plunge saw.  Top quality tools and the best part is the dust collection.  You may not realize it but breathing in wood dust can cause major issues long term.  In my younger years I didn't understand this and developed some major allergy and breathing issues due to dust.  Sinus infections all the time, allergies running nose like Niagra Falls.  Had some test done and my reaction to trees and pollen was off the charts.  Started using Festool and then a mid-size dust collector for the jointer and table saw.  Also went on allergy shots and now it is 1000 times better.
View Quote


This!  I could sand Corian while wearing a navy blue suit and not get a spec of dust on me. The Festool circular saw is one of the most amazing power tools ever. You can run crap out of their tools for hours and they are still cool to the touch. The Festool stuff is expensive and it is worth every penny.

Saw Stop table saws are absolute tops. Arfcom hates the owner but the machines are very well made and the brakes really work.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 10:33:29 AM EDT


If I were starting from scratch, and even though they aren't typically a woodshop item, I'd look for a true variable speed drill press with 5-6" spindle travel and outfit it with a t-slot table. They really do come in handy.




A 6" random orbit sander with proper dust collection is also something I use far more than expected and would spend a little extra time looking into.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 10:44:14 AM EDT
I'd urge you to consider a radial arm saw.  Always used mine a lot.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 11:13:12 AM EDT
Whats the sawstop back story?
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 11:14:33 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By tnburban:
If you have $18K to spend I would seriously consider getting some Festool items like a few sanders with a dust extractor, router, jigsaw and plunge saw.  Top quality tools and the best part is the dust collection.  You may not realize it but breathing in wood dust can cause major issues long term.  In my younger years I didn't understand this and developed some major allergy and breathing issues due to dust.  Sinus infections all the time, allergies running nose like Niagra Falls.  Had some test done and my reaction to trees and pollen was off the charts.  Started using Festool and then a mid-size dust collector for the jointer and table saw.  Also went on allergy shots and now it is 1000 times better.
View Quote


I agree dust collection is a top priority, but there are a lot of good systems out there without the high price of Festool.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 11:21:55 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Blu3Ridge:
I'm starting to furnish an attached workshop into my 4 stall pole barn garage, and am in needing of power tool recommendations.  Budget is about 18k.

Items on the list include:
Table (cabinet) saw
Miter saw
Jointer
Planer
Drill press
Ban saw
Lathe
Dust system
ETA: Router table

Projects include basically everything you'd see on an episode of the New Yankee Confederate Workshop.

View Quote


If you have a place for it you can have dust collector fan that ejects through the wall.  You never have to empty it and that's a huge bonus. Properly planned dust collection is worth it's weight in gold. If you can hang a 6" PVC system with gates you'll thank yourself down the road.

I use mostly Jet but Powermatic, Delta, and all the old names are good. Grizzly is nice if you want to save a little cash.  Most people buy used so the condition of the tool is more important that the brand if you're buying one of the old brands. It's hard to beat a Unisaw if you can find one for the right price.





Originally Posted By tnburban:
If you have $18K to spend I would seriously consider getting some Festool items like a few sanders with a dust extractor, router, jigsaw and plunge saw.  Top quality tools and the best part is the dust collection.  You may not realize it but breathing in wood dust can cause major issues long term.  In my younger years I didn't understand this and developed some major allergy and breathing issues due to dust.  Sinus infections all the time, allergies running nose like Niagra Falls.  Had some test done and my reaction to trees and pollen was off the charts.  Started using Festool and then a mid-size dust collector for the jointer and table saw.  Also went on allergy shots and now it is 1000 times better.
View Quote


Holy shit. I'd rather have 10 Delta dust collectors than 1 Festool.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 11:26:05 AM EDT
Why no metal working equipment? I make money in my metal shop doing repairs and mods to a lot of WW tools. A neighbor restores old WW machinery and is constantly asking me to key shafts, bore bushings & pulleys, D&T. Also machine custom form tools out of O1 for turning coves & beads.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 11:37:25 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Blu3Ridge:
Whats the sawstop back story?
View Quote

+1 was wondering this myself.  

What I have found in buying tools is to look at how easy it is to change out consumables.  My Dad has a Delta radial arm saw that is an absolute nightmare to change the blade.  

Link Posted: 9/2/2015 11:41:39 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Blu3Ridge:
Whats the sawstop back story?
View Quote


The owner was lobbying in DC that all new table saws must have his technology installed.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 11:46:17 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Yirmeyahu:
I am a hobbyist woodworker and have my 2 car garage set up as a workshop.  

My first recommendation is to build your dust collection system the best that you can afford. Visit Bill Pentz website and read up on it.    Your respiratory system will thank you.  Do NOT skimp in this area.

Powermatic is pretty much the defecto affordable woodworking tool manufacturer (although you will find many of the machines are made in the same factory.. the higher cost comes with better machining and features).

If budget allows, Festool is pretty much king (Kapex miter saw - yes!)

There are so many different types of tools and models that you can get lost.

I recommend researching dust collection and a good quality cabinet saw with good dust collection, side feed, and outfeed tables first.  Building these is also a possibility.  You can do most operations with a good table saw.

A jointer/planer generally go hand in hand for milling wood.

If you have any specific questions, you can IM me.

EDIT:  CLAMPS!  Good quality clamps.  You can never ever have too many.  I used to like the Jet Parallel clamps, but they seem to have gone down in quality as of late.  You can rarely go wrong with Bessey Revos.
View Quote


Yep, yep, and yep, on the dust collection system!

There were two Air Force base woodshops that I got to experience first hand.  One, if I recall correctly, was that as you were about to use some stationary power tool, you would pull the blast gate open on its dust collection "pipe", and that would cause the huge outside cyclone dust collector to kick on.

At the other shop, there was some like magnetic doughnut around the main power supply line leading out to the stationary power tools.  When this doughnut sensed that current was running through that line, then it would start up the big externally mounted cyclone dust collector.

I remember there were some ducts that led down to the floor for floor sweeps.  Each one had a huge speaker magnet epoxied to the opening.  If you were sweeping across the floor, any loose screws or nails would not get sucked up in the dust collection system...one for any sparks, and two to protect the impeller, possibly, from damage.


Link Posted: 9/2/2015 11:51:41 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jmarkma:


The owner was lobbying in DC that all new table saws must have his technology installed.
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Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By jmarkma:
Originally Posted By Blu3Ridge:
Whats the sawstop back story?


The owner was lobbying in DC that all new table saws must have his technology installed.


via OSHA regulations...so a commercial cabinetry* shop would have to either have their existing saws retrofitted with his SawStop device, or buy his saw... making him huge profits.

The guys at my local Woodcraft store say that the device doesn't actually work all that well, like it is advertised.



* = noticed I said cabinetry instead of cabinet shop or "cabinetmaker".... just to distinguish it from what hangs on your kitchen walls versus say a Chippendale high-boy dresser with handout dovetails and  carved by hand cabriole legs

Link Posted: 9/2/2015 12:01:33 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/2/2015 12:05:09 PM EDT by WeimaranerDad]
Originally Posted By Blu3Ridge:
I'm starting to furnish an attached workshop into my 4 stall pole barn garage, and am in needing of power tool recommendations.  Budget is about 18k.

Items on the list include:
Table (cabinet) saw either a Delta Unisaw or a Powermatic, I think they might still call it the P66
Miter saw that big honking 12" compound slide miter saw that DeWalt makes
Jointer definitely go with an 8 inch.  I don't know if Delta makes the DJ20 anymore, but that's what I would get
Planer Again, I'd look for Delta or a Powermatic, a 15 inch.
Drill press I have a General International.  But the biggest improvement I made was an X/Y or cross slide vise, and moving the one handle to the other side
Ban saw If you were going to resaw really wide lumber or really thick timbers into thinner strips, then I would look at a Laguna, probably at least a 16 or 18 inches.  I hear that Highland Hardware's wood slicer blades are awesome when it comes to resawing
Lathe look for an older Delta or Powermatic with what I think they call a Reeves drive.  Most likely to come out of a high school woodshop program which got shut down
Dust systemTorit/Blue tornado...or is it blue cyclone?  with Oneida heavier gauge sheet metal spiral ducting
ETA: Router table you can make either your tablesaw's outfeed or sidefeed table act as your router table.  

Projects include basically everything you'd see on an episode of the New Yankee Confederate Workshop.

View Quote


EDIT:  to turn stuff by hand on a lathe is quite the skill.  I would look at a Legacy Ornamental Late instead.  It is router based, and it appears to take out some off the guesswork or unknown out of getting multiple spindles to all look the same.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 12:06:26 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Blu3Ridge:
I'm starting to furnish an attached workshop into my 4 stall pole barn garage, and am in needing of power tool recommendations.  Budget is about 18k.

Items on the list include:
Table (cabinet) saw
Miter saw
Jointer
Planer
Drill press
Ban saw
Lathe
Dust system
ETA: Router table

Projects include basically everything you'd see on an episode of the New Yankee Confederate Workshop.

View Quote

Which Ban Saw do you want, PreBan or PostBan?
Now, if it were a Band Saw...

18K!!  WOW!!!
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 12:13:53 PM EDT
Is ShopSmith still a thing?  My grandpa did some great stuff with his into the '80s.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 12:31:58 PM EDT
I like Delta and Powermatic tables saws. I also like their planers as well. Exception to the rule is the Dewalt 735 planer. That son of agun will take you along way before you need a cabinet planer.  You can do just fine with a grizzly joiner. Lots of clamps and good dust collection. Porter cable routers all the way except for the Hitahi 12v. Mount it upside down and it is great for raised panel doors.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 12:41:18 PM EDT
Does the Festool MFT replace a cabinet saw?  Seeems like 90% of their product is based upon that MFT, which is good, as it saves space.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 12:42:24 PM EDT
Hit Craig's list and take your time. You can get some good buys there on commerical equipment. Consider buying a Shaper instead of a router table.  I would stay away from Crapman power tools. Unisaw and Jet are top of the line for table saws. There are a ton of Delta Contractor saws floating around and they would work just fine for private use. Make sure you have at least an 8ft table behind the table saw to run the material to.  I would buy the upper end Dewalt sliding compound miter saw in place of a radial arm saw.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 1:06:29 PM EDT
with 18K you have lots of room to play with
everybody has their own preference
so here we go

Lathe: Jet but the bigger ones are really good at wasting counter space... 99% of the time I dont need the capability to turn down bats or bed posts
Band Saw: Delta personal preference but I like mine because its simple, no frills, and easy to work on
Miter Saw: I dont have a brand preference but get the 12" when you need it.... you need it  
already mentioned but I would look for a cast iron top table saw with a router table setup or attachment
the one I work with is a older Grizzly with a expensive fence setup on it... I believe the fence cost almost as much as the saw
but when I work with it in comparison to my crappy cheap craftsman it makes me super happy
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 1:12:41 PM EDT
My timing was bad - Oh, to have been able to learn from my grandfather in his furniture shop.  All I remember about it is the whole building shook when he turned on the overhead belt drive (everything was run off the belt drive system.



Interested in thread - have never managed to keep a shop clean enough to use real tools - I have mostly portable contractor equipment that I can move around when I work.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 1:53:55 PM EDT
Get a Saw Stop table saw,  a Jet or Laguna bandsaw.  A jet or powermatic planer and jointer as big as you can afford/fit.  If you need it,  Jet wide sander.
Link Posted: 9/2/2015 3:14:20 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By WeimaranerDad:


via OSHA regulations...so a commercial cabinetry* shop would have to either have their existing saws retrofitted with his SawStop device, or buy his saw... making him huge profits.

The guys at my local Woodcraft store say that the device doesn't actually work all that well, like it is advertised.



* = noticed I said cabinetry instead of cabinet shop or "cabinetmaker".... just to distinguish it from what hangs on your kitchen walls versus say a Chippendale high-boy dresser with handout dovetails and  carved by hand cabriole legs

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By WeimaranerDad:
Originally Posted By jmarkma:
Originally Posted By Blu3Ridge:
Whats the sawstop back story?


The owner was lobbying in DC that all new table saws must have his technology installed.


via OSHA regulations...so a commercial cabinetry* shop would have to either have their existing saws retrofitted with his SawStop device, or buy his saw... making him huge profits.

The guys at my local Woodcraft store say that the device doesn't actually work all that well, like it is advertised.



* = noticed I said cabinetry instead of cabinet shop or "cabinetmaker".... just to distinguish it from what hangs on your kitchen walls versus say a Chippendale high-boy dresser with handout dovetails and  carved by hand cabriole legs



Sawstop makes damn nice saws politics aside.
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