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Link Posted: 12/4/2013 5:22:43 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By NHTriumph:




So......is the guy at 1:15 missing his arms or is he cold?

Anyone else think he looks a little weird?
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Originally Posted By NHTriumph:
Originally Posted By RRD3:
This is the laziness you seek.

Works damn good too.


http://youtu.be/N6GVHHNjMgE




So......is the guy at 1:15 missing his arms or is he cold?

Anyone else think he looks a little weird?


He tried shaving the hair on his arm and cut the whole thing off by accident.

TRG
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 5:25:11 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Deanventure:
Being able to sharpen a knife is a necessary skill. Having a knife that requires sharpening less often is just as important.


I constantly amazed at the absolutely shitty knives people carry. You won't know if your doing a good job sharpening if your edge goes dull after opening one cardboard box.  
Pay for a good knife with good steel and your time sharpening will be worth the effort.
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Yep.

CPM-M4, S30V, or Elmax, please.

Link Posted: 12/4/2013 5:28:54 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By USPcompact:


Yep.

CPM-M4, S30V, or Elmax, please.

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Originally Posted By USPcompact:
Originally Posted By Deanventure:
Being able to sharpen a knife is a necessary skill. Having a knife that requires sharpening less often is just as important.


I constantly amazed at the absolutely shitty knives people carry. You won't know if your doing a good job sharpening if your edge goes dull after opening one cardboard box.  
Pay for a good knife with good steel and your time sharpening will be worth the effort.


Yep.

CPM-M4, S30V, or Elmax, please.



agreed.  get good steel, from a maker known to do good heat-treats.

I like 1095, s30v, or CPM154 for daily use knives.  Elmax and M4 are more wear resistant....which means longer sharpening intervals...........but also means they are harder to sharpen.
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 5:29:39 AM EDT
I use 1000, 3000 and 6000 grit water stones to sharpen my chef's knives. The technique is in a handy video called "the chef's edge" made by Korin.com.

If you want to learn the Japanese knife sharpening method(very easy to learn, IMHO), this is the way to do it.
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 5:31:42 AM EDT
Send it to Apex Edge Pro, free sharpening, well you pay postage both ways.
http://www.edgeproinc.com/
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 5:33:44 AM EDT
Go to vintagearchery.com for an awesome strop method. Very inexpensive, superb quality. I bought it for broadheads, but use it for everything.
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 5:36:45 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By sleepdr:


That's a nuisance, indeed. I've been freehand sharpening for 30+ years. Though not an expert, I'm able to keep my knives functional.

I've stopped going for a highly polished edge, just sharp and coarse enough for my mostly slicing cuts. Razor strops, cardboard, frosted then smooth glass, etc. are fun to use but overkill for me.
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Originally Posted By sleepdr:
Originally Posted By rob78:
Originally Posted By Enlightenme556:
Originally Posted By AndyHk93M4:
i' put out approximately $100.00 for a Lansky sharpening system and I still managed to screw up one of my expensive knives after first practicing on a few cheap ones.

I gave up on trying to do it myself and take my knives to a professional knife sharpener


How did you mess up using a lansky?



On knives with blades over 4" or so, the lansky will change grind angle towards the tip.  The blade clamp has to be repositioned.

Otherwise I'm not sure how it could screw up a blade.


That's a nuisance, indeed. I've been freehand sharpening for 30+ years. Though not an expert, I'm able to keep my knives functional.

I've stopped going for a highly polished edge, just sharp and coarse enough for my mostly slicing cuts. Razor strops, cardboard, frosted then smooth glass, etc. are fun to use but overkill for me.


This is the crux of it.  Having never been able to get a satisfactory edge using freehand methods,  the lansky is the first method I've tried that gives a decent edge with minimal fuss.   It's not perfect but it's far more consistent for me.   Freehand sharpening has never been fun  - it feels like a chore.  Why bother if you don't like doing it?   OP seems to be in the same boat as me.    
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 5:38:34 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:


Me too.
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Originally Posted By stutzcattle:
Originally Posted By M4Real:
This thread is of interest to me so I'm tagging it.          


Me too.

Me three
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 6:25:50 AM EDT
I've dicked around with a lot of different sharpeners, and the one I continue to use is the ten dollar Samurai Shark that I bought at Walgreen's in the "As seen on TV" aisle.




Link Posted: 12/4/2013 6:27:27 AM EDT
I have a regular full size belt sander that I'll use with 320 and 600 grit sandpaper. Then I'll finish it off with a paper wheels.

I also have a satinbrite belt for the sander, cleans the blade up nicely.

I've also used 1000 grit glued to a mousepad for the final hone.
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 6:38:38 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 6:40:07 AM EDT

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Originally Posted By fla556guy:
agreed.  get good steel, from a maker known to do good heat-treats.



I like 1095, s30v, or CPM154 for daily use knives.  Elmax and M4 are more wear resistant....which means longer sharpening intervals...........but also means they are harder to sharpen.
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Originally Posted By fla556guy:



Originally Posted By USPcompact:


Originally Posted By Deanventure:

Being able to sharpen a knife is a necessary skill. Having a knife that requires sharpening less often is just as important.





I constantly amazed at the absolutely shitty knives people carry. You won't know if your doing a good job sharpening if your edge goes dull after opening one cardboard box.  

Pay for a good knife with good steel and your time sharpening will be worth the effort.





Yep.



CPM-M4, S30V, or Elmax, please.







agreed.  get good steel, from a maker known to do good heat-treats.



I like 1095, s30v, or CPM154 for daily use knives.  Elmax and M4 are more wear resistant....which means longer sharpening intervals...........but also means they are harder to sharpen.
Much harder to sharpen!

S30v is a PITA compared to D2.  No experience with M4 or Elmax.



 
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 10:19:48 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Deanventure:

S30v is a PITA compared to D2.  No experience with M4 or Elmax.
 
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My brother-in-law asked me to "touch up" his knife with S30V steel and it took me probably 20 minutes to get it to a razor with the wheels.  He said that he had already worked on it "an hour or so" using a strop with some sort of fairly aggressive compound on it, and it hardly did anything to it.  154CM is a piece of cake compared to that stuff.  

He did say that it stayed scary sharp a long time, though...
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 10:28:20 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Deanventure:


Much harder to sharpen!
S30v is a PITA compared to D2.  No experience with M4 or Elmax.
 
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Originally Posted By Deanventure:
Originally Posted By fla556guy:
Originally Posted By USPcompact:
Originally Posted By Deanventure:
Being able to sharpen a knife is a necessary skill. Having a knife that requires sharpening less often is just as important.


I constantly amazed at the absolutely shitty knives people carry. You won't know if your doing a good job sharpening if your edge goes dull after opening one cardboard box.  
Pay for a good knife with good steel and your time sharpening will be worth the effort.


Yep.

CPM-M4, S30V, or Elmax, please.



agreed.  get good steel, from a maker known to do good heat-treats.

I like 1095, s30v, or CPM154 for daily use knives.  Elmax and M4 are more wear resistant....which means longer sharpening intervals...........but also means they are harder to sharpen.


Much harder to sharpen!
S30v is a PITA compared to D2.  No experience with M4 or Elmax.
 


Elmax is, by far, the best steel I've used for an EDC knife.  I need to search around and find its composition, as I'm betting it's just a more familiar PM steel that's been rebadged.  Whatever it is, it's fantastic - provided you have something that will work on it.  I've got maybe a dozen DMT stones,  maybe twice that many Japanese water stones (from basic Nortons to a 10k Naniwa Chosera and a Sigma 13k), and another half-dozen oil stones (including a 10"x4" black stone that is the shit for simple high-carbon steels like O1).  

The best thing I've found to keep the edge shaving sharp is a quick daily strop on leather/mesquite with a 3µ diamond paste followed by a different strop with 1µ diamond paste.  It's been a few months since it's touched a stone and it's still hair-popping sharp.
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 6:44:18 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 6:44:53 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Dorcas:
Spyderco Sharpmaker
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This
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 6:50:31 PM EDT
Stropman.
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 6:55:46 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Dorcas:
Spyderco Sharpmaker
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Link Posted: 12/4/2013 6:59:08 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/4/2013 7:06:04 PM EDT
Edge pro is an excellent choice. You only need the 220, the next stone up and the 600 to finish with. You really don't need the finest stones or the polishing tapes. The 600 gives you a very useable finish. One you own the "system" replacement stones are inexpensive. I own a $700 Tormeck wet grinder and would rather use my edge pro.
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 1:58:20 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 2:05:52 PM EDT
No one uses their car window?
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 2:07:14 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 2:45:27 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/5/2013 2:46:24 PM EDT by brass]
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 2:54:23 PM EDT
Edge pro apex for a good blade profile, then use spyderco sharp maker to keep the blade honed and for quick sharpening jobs
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 3:02:49 PM EDT
I started out using sharpening stones and oil as a teenager.  The most difficult to master.  At some point in time I got the Lansky sharpener and used it for a while.  Works fine, a little time consuming.  Then I tried the Spyderco Sharpmaker which I continue to use to this day.  It's easy and takes little time.  Unless you attach "manliness" and "gayness" to a particular method of sharpening take your pick.
Link Posted: 12/5/2013 3:10:24 PM EDT
Lansky
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 3:59:07 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Aimless:
yup  
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Originally Posted By Aimless:
Originally Posted By Dorcas:
Spyderco Sharpmaker
yup  


Upon Penguin endorsement, I ordered one.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 4:05:04 PM EDT
I've got an old Gerber Gator.   Half serrated.   Locking blade.

It was my brother's knife (dead 12 years now).  It's missing one half of the screw/binding post.  

Should I get a good knife-maker to just convert it into a fixed blade with a nice wood handle?  The rubber grip is pretty well worn out and I can't seem to find a replacement fastener for it.  I could maybe make one on the lathe but... that's alot of work for this.

It's not worth much, but it does hold alot of sentimental value to me.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 4:10:08 PM EDT

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Originally Posted By 1Andy2:


I've got an old Gerber Gator.   Half serrated.   Locking blade.

...

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Have you contacted Gerber?





 
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 4:14:59 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By parshooter:

Have you contacted Gerber?

 
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Originally Posted By parshooter:
Originally Posted By 1Andy2:
I've got an old Gerber Gator.   Half serrated.   Locking blade.
...

Have you contacted Gerber?

 


It's been awhile since I thought about this, so no not recently.

Did find this

http://www.amazon.com/Gerber-06079-Folding-Point-Serrated/dp/B00004WA4U/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1386465184&sr=8-5&keywords=gerber+gator

Pretty much what I have.   I'll bet I can get replacement screw.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 4:15:41 PM EDT
I don't always sharpen knives but when I do I use the Spyderco Sharpmaker.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 4:23:30 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By NHTriumph:




So......is the guy at 1:15 missing his arms or is he cold?

Anyone else think he looks a little weird?
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Originally Posted By NHTriumph:
Originally Posted By RRD3:
This is the laziness you seek.

Works damn good too.


http://youtu.be/N6GVHHNjMgE




So......is the guy at 1:15 missing his arms or is he cold?

Anyone else think he looks a little weird?


He's an odd one alright.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 4:25:10 PM EDT

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Originally Posted By 1Andy2:



It's been awhile since I thought about this, so no not recently.

Did find this

http://www.amazon.com/Gerber-06079-Folding-Point-Serrated/dp/B00004WA4U/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1386465184&sr=8-5&keywords=gerber+gator

Pretty much what I have.   I'll bet I can get replacement screw.
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Originally Posted By 1Andy2:



Originally Posted By parshooter:


Originally Posted By 1Andy2:

I've got an old Gerber Gator.   Half serrated.   Locking blade.

...

Have you contacted Gerber?

 
It's been awhile since I thought about this, so no not recently.

Did find this

http://www.amazon.com/Gerber-06079-Folding-Point-Serrated/dp/B00004WA4U/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1386465184&sr=8-5&keywords=gerber+gator

Pretty much what I have.   I'll bet I can get replacement screw.


There ya' go.  I'd rob another one of parts before sending it off to Gerber though, since it was your brother's.  (They might just send you a new replacement.)





 
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 4:25:17 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By RRD3:

When you can shave with a KBAR and have no drag you know it's sharp

 
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Originally Posted By RRD3:
Originally Posted By chmodx:
Originally Posted By RRD3:
This is the laziness you seek.

Works damn good too.


http://youtu.be/N6GVHHNjMgE


I have this an will vouch for it.  Hand sharpeners create a different profile.  This creates a beveled edge that literally shaves your arm hair clean off once done.  I love mine and have given a few as gifts with good success.

When you can shave with a KBAR and have no drag you know it's sharp

 


Nice! I was wondering if it could handle a blade like that.
My KBAR is my favorite knife.
Link Posted: 12/7/2013 4:30:48 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Bloencustoms:
A nice big flat bench stone is the best option. The reason most people have trouble sharpening knives is they try to do it with a tiny pocket sized stone, holding the stone in one hand and the knife in the other. In the old days, people had nice big stones that sat on your work bench, and you could use BOTH hands to hold the blade steady at a consistent angle for sharpening.

With a good bench stone you can sharpen knives, chisels, and polish metal parts, etc. A lot more useful than an awkward jig.

As for the diamond stones, those need a break-in period before they work well. Out of the box they are way too coarse until a bit of use knocks off the big chunks of diamond and then they put a good finish on the steel.

And you should always follow up with a leather strop with a little polishing compound on it to get the edge "scary sharp".
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This is the correct answer. I've been making knives since I was 13 (I'm 39). As far as I'm concerned, stones, either Arkansas or water, are the only way to sharpen a knife. It's a skill. You can't just pick up a knife and sharpen on a stone right off the bat, but once you learn how to do it correctly, you'll never go back to anything else.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 5:04:41 AM EDT
I got my sharp maker in. Easy as pie.
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