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Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:16:45 AM EDT
[#1]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Lets See....


BUSH and REGAN WERE NOT SOCIALIST!


In my mind, that has nothing to do with it.

Yes, Ronald Reagan spoke directly to schoolchildren in 1988.  Yes, George H. W. Bush did it sometime in 1991.  Was it appropriate then?  In my mind, no.

Regardless of the attempted integration of the speech into the class curriculum (as viewed on the Department of Education's released materials), it's wholly inappropriate for an elected official to preach to minors without their parents present.  I don't care if it's a Republican, Democrat, Libertarian, President, Mayor, Governor, or what.  You want to talk to schoolchildren?  Use some evening television time, and let the PARENTS decide whether or not the children will view it.


During school hours?

Where I went to school, we didn't have television - or at the most, we had them to watch movies via VCR.


Was this televised after school or during school hours?

Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:16:56 AM EDT
[#2]
AFTER I see Obama's..............I'll let you know.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:18:33 AM EDT
[#3]
Oh and to the OP, You may want to factor THIS into the debate

REMINDER TO ALL ––- The "Small Schools Workshop" - Ayers & Obama funded Commie schools
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:18:47 AM EDT
[#4]
Quoted:
I don't recall any televised speech given by an acting US president with a target audience of school children.  I may be entirely wrong though.  I just can't think of any in my lifetime (Nixon through this asshat).

Same here...I'm hard-pressed to come up with anything.

Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:19:55 AM EDT
[#5]
I don't recall Bush or Reagan doing that but the Obama one stands out becasue there aer questions on how you can help the president and accountability procedures such as following up on the kids goals they come up with.  It's more than just listening to a speech, it's making kids take action.  Actually I think it would be kind of neat if they had kids watch state of the union addresses once in a while.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:20:02 AM EDT
[#6]
Quoted:
Neither of those guys were fucking communists, hell bent on destroying the greatest nation in the history of civilization. Next question.


Hard to beat this statement!

HH
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:20:18 AM EDT
[#7]
The answer is simple- If Obama so much as sells hello to your kids, he's doing it out of some motivation for himself.  He's constantly in campaign mode, because that's all he's ever done.  If any other president, be it Carter, JFK, Bush, Reagan, whoever, had given a speech about working hard in school, no one would have a problem.



Obama has shown that he really doesn't have an interest in America, only in his own success.  If his plans require America to fail, then so be it.  No other president has been anywhere close to as Orweillan as Obama.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:22:28 AM EDT
[#8]
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:27:25 AM EDT
[#9]
How could Bush or Reagan address the nation's kids when most schools at that time had one huge TV on the wheeled cart that took the A/V club guy or the janitor to try to hook up.  If I remember right, you had to reserve the TV a few days in advance.  

Maybe I just went to a poor school?
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:33:18 AM EDT
[#10]
Flashback 1991: Gephardt Called Bush's Speech to Students 'Paid Political Advertising':



House
Democrats criticized President Bush yesterday for using Education
Department funds to produce and broadcast a speech that he made Tuesday
at a Northwest Washington junior high school.



The
Democratic critics accused Bush of turning government money for
education to his own political use, namely, an ongoing effort to
inoculate himself against their charges of inattention to domestic
issues. The speech at Alice Deal Junior High School, broadcast live on
radio and television, urged students to study hard, avoid drugs and
turn in troublemakers.



"The Department of Education should not
be producing paid political advertising for the president, it should be
helping us to produce smarter students," House Majority Leader Richard
A. Gephardt (D-Mo.) said. "And the president should be doing more about
education than saying, 'Lights, camera, action.' "
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:38:18 AM EDT
[#11]
You libtard dumbfucks need to go back and listen to your hero, JFK.  





"It's not about what your country can do for you, but what you can do for your country".





Obama's speech to the kids is about "What you can do for Obama".





See the difference?  Now step out to the woodshed, pick out a nice piece of hickory and beat some fucking sense into your sorry asses.

 
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:39:23 AM EDT
[#12]
I see there's no shortage of the usual arfcom hyperbole.  Gimme a break.  This is the EXACT same thing Reagan and Bush did.

It's a "stay in school" message.  "The O logo"?  "Stem-cells"?  Where do you guys get some of this shit?  Do you believe every email forward you get?  Apparently.

By the way, push your kid in your political direction too hard (regardless of which direction that is) and it WILL blow up in your face.  Guaran-fucking-teed.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:44:25 AM EDT
[#13]
Quoted:
http://www.msnbc.msn.com/id/32673334/ns/politics-white_house/#storyContinued


I'm looking for ammo in a libtard discussion, not trolling. calm down folks.

BTW it's not closed circuit TV, just not aired during prime time. you can watch it if you want.


And we can decide if our children will.

That is the difference.

Link Posted: 9/4/2009 9:50:30 AM EDT
[#14]
If Obama speaks to kids about the importance of staying in school and getting a good education then that's simply a public service announcement.

It's not the speech, it's the lesson plan that the Dept. of Education has suggested go along with it.

 > having the students write memorable quotes form the presidents speech.  Presumably to be hung up around the classroom for "inspiration"
 > having the students write letters to themselves on how they can "help" the president  ( that has since been amended to read " write letters to themselves on what they can do to achieve their short and long term goals" )




BTW-  Are all the students that complete the lesson plan going to get Brown ( red ) Scarfs to wear?
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 10:18:32 AM EDT
[#15]
It's a probe / trap. They want to see how much backlash they can generate. Once it has been generated they will back off. We will all here a great noble speech from Obama.
It will preach the importance of staying in school and  a good education. They will use it as a chance to vilify all of those opposed to it as right wing nut jobs, that are against
The One no matter what.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 10:28:07 AM EDT
[#16]
Quoted:
Quoted:
During school hours?

Where I went to school, we didn't have television - or at the most, we had them to watch movies via VCR.


Was this televised after school or during school hours?



That I'm not sure of, honestly.  Here's what I found:

http://www.reagan.utexas.edu/archives/speeches/1988/111488c.htm

http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu/research/public_papers.php?id=3450&year=1991&month=10



"But in a world of change you also need to pay attention to the moral and spiritual values that will stay with you, unchanged, throughout a long lifetime. "


Oh how right Reagan was.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 10:29:12 AM EDT
[#17]
Quoted:
Flashback 1991: Gephardt Called Bush's Speech to Students 'Paid Political Advertising':

HouseDemocrats criticized President Bush yesterday for using EducationDepartment funds to produce and broadcast a speech that he made Tuesdayat a Northwest Washington junior high school.

TheDemocratic critics accused Bush of turning government money foreducation to his own political use, namely, an ongoing effort toinoculate himself against their charges of inattention to domesticissues. The speech at Alice Deal Junior High School, broadcast live onradio and television, urged students to study hard, avoid drugs andturn in troublemakers.

"The Department of Education should notbe producing paid political advertising for the president, it should behelping us to produce smarter students," House Majority Leader RichardA. Gephardt (D-Mo.) said. "And the president should be doing more abouteducation than saying, 'Lights, camera, action.' "


Great find.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 10:35:15 AM EDT
[#18]
Quoted:
Quoted:
During school hours?

Where I went to school, we didn't have television - or at the most, we had them to watch movies via VCR.


Was this televised after school or during school hours?



That I'm not sure of, honestly.  Here's what I found:

http://www.reagan.utexas.edu/archives/speeches/1988/111488c.htm

http://bushlibrary.tamu.edu/research/public_papers.php?id=3450&year=1991&month=10



I have no doubt the left will clamp onto this line from Pres. Bush.

Let me leave you with a simple message: Every time you walk through that classroom door, make it your mission to get a good education. Don't do it just because your parents, or even the President, tells you. Do it for yourselves. Do it for your future. And while you're at it, help a little brother or sister to learn, or maybe even Mom or Dad. Let me know how you're doing. Write me a letter –– and I'm serious about this one –– write me a letter about ways you can help us achieve our goals. I think you know the address.

Link Posted: 9/4/2009 10:40:02 AM EDT
[#19]
Reagan didn't see kids a a backdoor to future socialism.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 10:46:21 AM EDT
[#20]
If Bush and Reagan did this, why do I keep hearing about how this is the first time a president has delivered an address to the nation's schoolchildren??  I heard it on the radio this morning, I heard it yesterday and the the day before as well.  It might be a first for him, but it's not the first time it's been done:

Give me four years to teach the children and the seed I have sown will never be uprooted. - Vladimir Ilyich Lenin
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 10:56:53 AM EDT
[#21]
I don't recall seeing any such speeches from Reagan or Carter when I was in school.  The only time they used the TVs outside of education was to show the breaking news of the space shuttle disaster.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 11:01:57 AM EDT
[#22]
Quoted:
Quoted:

Quoted:


I was a "kid" during that timeframe and I don't ever remember sitting in school listening to a presidential address directed at children.  I watched State of the Union addresses at home and current events on the news but never "listen up, the president is going to give a speech and you are going to listen."

...or is this more bullshit revisionist history being trumped up to defend Teh Messiah

Same here. I never had a talk from Reagan while I was in school.



 


Reagan told me the bombing was going to start in 5 min. ,  I've been ready since !







Classic!!!  Well played, sir!  
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 12:41:06 PM EDT
[#23]
Quoted:
Heh...

Just surfed over the welfare shelter which is NOLA.com.  "Reagan and Bush did it" is the standardized defense over there too.  Is this some sort of DailyKOS talking point now?




That's what they're all saying over at media matters too.  So, if Reagan and Bush did it, why does the letter Obama's Education Secretary sent out to principals say that this is an "historic" event, and Obama is the first President to do this???


Methinks what Obama is doing is different enough from anything that Reagan or Bush did that even Obama's administration claims it's a "first" for a sitting President.  So, which is it?  His administration claims he's the first President to do it, which makes it sound like a very big deal (no doubt to encourage participation); but in responding to critics, his supporters claim that it's been done before by Republican Presidents so it's no different than anything Reagan or Bush did.  Get your facts and your stories straight, BHO administration and supporters!




Link Posted: 9/4/2009 12:46:49 PM EDT
[#24]
Quoted:
I think it was the Department of Education's little Q&A sessions that it was recommending, following the speech, that has people up in arms. I personally will be calling the schools tomorrow.


This...

Elections have consequences...  If Obama wants to deliver a motivational speech to students, I may not like it, but fine...  The BS about 'helping Obama' is the problem.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 12:48:28 PM EDT
[#25]
Quoted:
Obama is the first president in history to address k-12 students directly


No he isn't.  Bush did it in 91'.  The media has been saying that Obama is the first, but they are wrong.


Just google "Bush speech to students" and you'll find the whole transcript.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 12:56:35 PM EDT
[#26]
Quoted:
How could Bush or Reagan address the nation's kids when most schools at that time had one huge TV on the wheeled cart that took the A/V club guy or the janitor to try to hook up.  If I remember right, you had to reserve the TV a few days in advance.  
Maybe I just went to a poor school?





Dude, you just brought back a LOT of memories.


edit:

Twenty years. Where'ed they go?
Twenty years. I don't know.
I sit and wonder sometimes.....where they've gone.
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 12:58:47 PM EDT
[#27]
Quoted:
Neither of those guys were fucking communists, hell bent on destroying the greatest nation in the history of civilization. Next question.


That. /thread
Link Posted: 9/4/2009 5:15:32 PM EDT
[#28]



Quoted:


Flashback 1991: Gephardt Called Bush's Speech to Students 'Paid Political Advertising':



HouseDemocrats criticized President Bush yesterday for using EducationDepartment funds to produce and broadcast a speech that he made Tuesdayat a Northwest Washington junior high school.



TheDemocratic critics accused Bush of turning government money foreducation to his own political use, namely, an ongoing effort toinoculate himself against their charges of inattention to domesticissues. The speech at Alice Deal Junior High School, broadcast live onradio and television, urged students to study hard, avoid drugs andturn in troublemakers.



"The Department of Education should notbe producing paid political advertising for the president, it should behelping us to produce smarter students," House Majority Leader RichardA. Gephardt (D-Mo.) said. "And the president should be doing more abouteducation than saying, 'Lights, camera, action.' "


Is this your troll DU account?





http://www.democraticunderground.com/discuss/duboard.php?az=show_mesg&forum=389&topic_id=6454633&mesg_id=6462656



LEAVE COLD



 
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 5:02:59 AM EDT
[#29]
Quoted:
1.  Everything Obama has done since starting office - EVERYTHING - has been a politically calculated move intent on destroying the strength of our country and its foundations.  Parents have good reason to be vigilant.



Sums it up nicely.
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 6:37:23 AM EDT
[#30]
Those that do not pay attention to history are doomed to repeat it.   I have been equating him to Hitler since last summer.  As for what the allegations are regarding this speech, Thank God I send my children to a parochial school.  


Screw Obongo!!!!!!!!
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 6:44:35 AM EDT
[#31]
I don't remember lesson plans coming along with it.

Quoted:
topic says it all. Regan and Bush both addressed kids, why is this such a big deal?


Link Posted: 9/7/2009 6:54:25 AM EDT
[#32]
So the DEMS where in an out roar in 1991 over the BUSH speech to the schools.
Why is it OK now?
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 6:55:15 AM EDT
[#33]
The OP's inability to spell the man's name correctly says it all.
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 9:18:34 AM EDT
[#34]



Quoted:


Sorry OP, but








I may be wrong, but I don't believe that either Reagan or Bush (either Bush, for that matter) did what Obama is doing.  In fact, I was in school for the entirety of the Ford, Carter, and Reagan administrations, and none of them ever closed-circuited themselves into our classrooms to speak to us.  I'm sure that all three at some point visited a school, but none of them exhibited the creepy arrogance of Obama by inserting themselves into childrens' daily routines.



Fuck Obama.



ETA:  And Nixon's second term, such as it was.  He didn't do it either.



Fuck Obama again.



Well, I guess I'm wrong.  George H. W. Bush did, in fact, address all of the nation's kids.  However, it was after I was out of school and serving overseas in the .mil, and I have no recollection of it.  You were right, I was wrong.  My bad.








 
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 9:33:57 AM EDT
[#35]
When prior presidents did it, did they also want the kids to write a letter about how the kids could help him?
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 9:53:12 AM EDT
[#36]



Quoted:


When prior presidents did it, did they also want the kids to write a letter about how the kids could help him?


H. W. Bush did actually ask the kids to write him a letter:





Let me leave you with a simple message: Every time you walk through
that classroom door, make it your mission to get a good education.
Don't do it just because your parents, or even the President, tells
you. Do it for yourselves. Do it for your future. And while you're at
it, help a little brother or sister to learn, or maybe even Mom or Dad.
Let me know how you're doing. Write me a letter –– and I'm serious
about this one –– write me a letter about ways you can help us achieve
our goals. I think you know the address.





However, Bush's speech talked more about the individual and personal responsibility, where BHO's tends to talk about how kids need to get educated so they can help the country.



 
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 10:07:20 AM EDT
[#37]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Lets See....


BUSH and REGAN WERE NOT SOCIALIST!


In my mind, that has nothing to do with it.

Yes, Ronald Reagan spoke directly to schoolchildren in 1988.  Yes, George H. W. Bush did it sometime in 1991.  Was it appropriate then?  In my mind, no.

Regardless of the attempted integration of the speech into the class curriculum (as viewed on the Department of Education's released materials), it's wholly inappropriate for an elected official to preach to minors without their parents present.  I don't care if it's a Republican, Democrat, Libertarian, President, Mayor, Governor, or what.  You want to talk to schoolchildren?  Use some evening television time, and let the PARENTS decide whether or not the children will view it.


This.

Doesn't matter what is said, such a speech is not within the powers of the president.

Just because Reagan did it, does not mean it was good. We need only to look toward his "War on Drugs" to see that the man was not a perfect president. But so what? Does pointing to a past mistake make a present one good? Does pointing out a flaw of Reagan make him completely terrible? Both such tactics are illogical, and if you, OP, are really looking for ammunition to use against liberals using these arguments, then you need only point out the lack of logic in such tactics. Whether Reagan, Bush, or anyone else did what Obama is doing, that does not mean Obama is correct.

Plus, Obama is taking this event much further than Reagan or Bush ever did.  

Link Posted: 9/7/2009 10:33:36 AM EDT
[#38]
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 12:07:08 PM EDT
[#39]
Oh lookie ... even Newt Gingrich is saying this speech is good for kids to hear:



http://twitter.com/newtgingrich
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 12:29:54 PM EDT
[#40]
Exactly. The "menu of classroom activities" a.k.a. curriculum is unconstitutional, something Gingrich, Giuliani and the rest of the supposed conservatives seem to be overlooking.



http://www.ed.gov/about/overview/focus/what_pg3.html



Damn this pisses me off.




Quoted:



Quoted:

I think it was the Department of Education's little Q&A sessions that it was recommending, following the speech, that has people up in arms. I personally will be calling the schools tomorrow.




This...



Elections have consequences...  If Obama wants to deliver a motivational speech to students, I may not like it, but fine...  The BS about 'helping Obama' is the problem.






 
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 12:43:27 PM EDT
[#41]
President Reagan spoke to the students at Fallston High School on December 4, 1985 and I was there.

I don’t remember any controversy.  Here is the text to his speech.


Remarks to the Students and Faculty at Fallston High School in Fallston, Maryland
December 4, 1985
Thank you, Alyson, and thank you all very much. Governor Hughes, Senator Mathias, Representative Bentley, and the representatives of the board of education, the administration, the faculty, and you, the student body –– believe me, it is good to be here. It's great to be here at Fallston High School, home of the Cougars –– [laughter] –– and the Cougar cheerleaders, who I understand will be competing in a big contest this evening. I hope you can all get out to Sunrise [Rising Sun] for that event. I wish I could be there. [Laughter]
You know, I've only been out of school a few years, but –– [laughter] –– they tell me that things have changed quite a bit in the meantime. There's one thing that I bet, though, hasn't changed. When you heard that you'd have to cancel your scheduled class for a special assembly, well, I hope you weren't too disappointed. [Laughter] I know I've been looking forward to this chance to speak to you, because I've got a very important mission that I want young Americans to be a part of. Let me first just give a little background.
As you know, Nancy and I returned almost 2 weeks ago from Geneva where I had several lengthy meetings with General Secretary Gorbachev of the Soviet Union. I had more than 15 hours of discussions with him, including 5 hours of private conversation just between the two of us. I found him to be a determined man, but one who is willing to listen. And I told him about America's deep desire for peace and that we do not threaten the Soviet Union and that I believe the people of both our countries want the same thing –– a safer and better future for themselves and their children. You know, people don't start wars, governments do. Our meeting should be of special importance to all of you. I know you're concerned about the future, about the growth in nuclear arsenals, about injustice and persecution of fellow human beings, and about threats to peace around the world. Well, it's because I shared that concern that I went to Geneva to begin a dialog for peace with Mr. Gorbachev.
We talked about many things –– the need to cut the number of offensive nuclear weapons on each side, the wars of independence being waged by freedom fighters against Soviet-backed regimes around the world, human rights, and how we could improve our overall relationship. I also stressed to Mr. Gorbachev how our nation's commitment to the Strategic Defense Initiative, our research and development of a nonnuclear, high-tech shield that would protect us against ballistic missiles, and how we were committed to that. I told him that SDI was a reason to hope, not to fear; that the advance of technology, which originally gave us ballistic missiles, may soon be able to make them obsolete. I told him that SDI history had taken a positive turn, that men of good will should be rejoicing, that our deliverance from the awful threat of nuclear weapons may be on the horizon, and I suggested to him that I saw the hand of Providence in that. What could be more moral than a system based on protecting human life rather than destroying it? I could no more negotiate away SDI than I could barter with your future. As I told Mr. Gorbachev, as far as I'm concerned, a defense shield is an insurance policy for your future, and I think he understood our sincerity on this issue.
We were realistic going into these meetings with the Soviets. The United States and the Soviet Union are as different as any two nations can be. These differences are based on opposing philosophies and values and no differences could be more profound or meaningful. It is virtually impossible for us to understand their system and how, over these –– what –– 70 years, it has imposed a way of thinking on their people. So, we didn't expect miracles. But we wanted these talks, if possible, to plant the seeds of hope in our relationship, the hope that some day, perhaps, might blossom into a real peace, a lasting peace, resting upon the only foundation on which a true peace can be built –– the indestructible foundation of human freedom. And I was determined to see if we could begin to narrow some of our differences and even come to some agreements where there was common ground. I believe that we've made a good start.
This is the mission I've come to speak to you about. One of the most exciting developments to come out of Geneva was Mr. Gorbachev's agreement to people-to-people exchanges. We're still negotiating the specifics, and it remains to be seen how much the Soviets will be willing to open up their closed society. But our objective is massive exchange programs between private citizens in both countries –– between people, not government bodies. Let's allow the people of the Soviet Union and the people of the United States to get to know each other, without governments getting in the way. And that's one reason I'm here today –– to encourage young people like you from across the country to take part in these people-to-people exchanges as never before in our history. I believe such contacts are an essential part of our building a lasting foundation for peace, because true peace must be based on openness and people talking to each other rather than about each other, and the peace must also be based on understanding. And that's why I proposed to Mr. Gorbachev that we let young people from each country spend time in the other's schools, universities, summer camps, and homes. Americans would be able to see for themselves what life is like in the Soviet Union, and their young people could see for themselves the freedom and openness of our society and that we do not bear the people of the Soviet Union any ill will.
So, we'll establish scholarship funds to make it possible for the best and the brightest of both countries to take part in these exchanges. We will also exchange teachers to impart a deeper understanding of our respective histories, cultures, and languages –– where we have much to learn from one another. We'll resume cooperation in cancer research to combat one of the century's most hated diseases. And we can jointly prepare for the demands of the 21st century with a cooperative program for the development of educational software. It won't be all work and no play. We'll have regular meets in various sports and increased television coverage of these sports events. We can't eliminate competition from our relationship, but we can channel some of it to the playing fields and courts rather than the international arena. These programs and others that may be worked out will not solve all the problems that exist between us, but they can be a beginning to building communities of trust and understanding. If Soviet mistrust of our country is at the bottom of some of the tension between us, then, I know that even a few hours spent with America's open and eager younger generation would dispel mistrust in even the most suspicious soul. So, those who participate in these programs will be our good-will ambassadors to the Soviet Union.
I know that all of you have dreams and hopes for the future. For some, there are dreams of college and a challenging career; for others, a good job, a car, a house of your own. And most of you, I'm sure, plan to marry and raise a family. All these dreams can come true if we have peace. Twice in my lifetime I have seen world wars that robbed our young people of their dreams. And the awesome power of nuclear weapons makes me even more determined to see that it doesn't happen again. As I've said many times before, a nuclear war cannot be won and must never be fought. So, I went to Geneva to set a course for enduring peace. And while I can't say that the path is clear, we've made a start.
Mr. Gorbachev and I agreed to press on in several arms control areas where there is common ground, especially to achieve deep reductions in nuclear arsenals. We will also continue talking about our differences on regional issues. And we had a heart-to-heart talk about human rights. These are the cornerstones on which peace and your future rest. You and young people like you have a vital role in bringing about a better future by keeping America strong and by helping draw the people of the United States and the Soviet Union closer together. And we will continue the dialog begun at Geneva to reach agreements for deep reductions in nuclear arsenals with strict compliance; to help support an end to the regional conflicts that carry the seeds of wider wars; and to uphold the ideal of human rights and justice for all peoples.
Mr. Gorbachev, as the leader of the Soviet Union –– the new leader –– has held out the promise of change. He has said that he wants better relations between our two nations. Well, what better way than allowing people to travel freely back and forth? Let's begin, at the very least, to draw back the barriers that separate our peoples from one another. We're asking for no more than what the Soviets have already agreed to in the Helsinki accords. Freedom of movement and information, contact between peoples –– the Soviet Union has already signed its name to a commitment to these things. We should have no illusions that people-to-people contacts will solve all the problems, however, that exist between us. The Soviet Union is not a democracy. The hopes and aspirations of the Soviet people have little or no direct effect on government policy. But these changes are a beginning to building a better world, one based on better human understanding. You can have a vital role in bringing about this better future, in drawing the people of our two nations closer together. It's an exciting adventure, one that will not be completed this year or next. But we must begin somewhere. And with God's help, we may reach that free and peaceful world that we all desire.
I promise the young people of America that I will see to it that information on these people-to-people exchanges is widely disseminated. I want all of you throughout America to have a chance to meet and get to know your counterparts in the Soviet Union, so that you can tell them all about this great country of ours. And we'll continue our efforts to reach agreements for deep reductions in nuclear arsenals with strict compliance; to help support an end to regional conflicts; and to see to it that human rights are respected. Together we can build a future that will be safer and more secure for you and your children.
I couldn't help but –– one point in our discussions privately with General Secretary Gorbachev –– when you stop to think that we're all God's children, wherever we may live in the world, I couldn't help but say to him, just think how easy his task and mine might be in these meetings that we held if suddenly there was a threat to this world from some other species, from another planet, outside in the universe. We'd forget all the little local differences that we have between our countries, and we would find out once and for all that we really are all human beings here on this Earth together. Well, I don't suppose we can wait for some alien race to come down and threaten us, but I think that between us we can bring about that realization.
Thank you all. God bless you all.

Link Posted: 9/7/2009 1:04:38 PM EDT
[#42]
I don't LIKE Obama, nor do I trust him.

If I had kids it would be MY call.

No further justification/explanation required.

Agree or no, it would be NOYFB.

I am sure a few parents had issues with Republican Presidents addressing their children, as well.

(ETA: I strangely do not remember either occurring, if you have links it would be appreciated)

Difference is they were not made out to be "left wing extremists".

Likely no one said ANYTHING when they kept their kids at home that day.

Isn't our current administration grand?

If you disagree with them on anything, you are:

Racist
Right Wing Extremist
All of the above
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 1:10:46 PM EDT
[#43]
FWIW, here's the text of Obama's speech...


The President: Hello everyone - how's everybody doing today? I'm here with students at Wakefield High School in Arlington, Virginia. And we've got students tuning in from all across America, kindergarten through twelfth grade. I'm glad you all could join us today.

I know that for many of you, today is the first day of school. And for those of you in kindergarten, or starting middle or high school, it's your first day in a new school, so it's understandable if you're a little nervous. I imagine there are some seniors out there who are feeling pretty good right now, with just one more year to go. And no matter what grade you're in, some of you are probably wishing it were still summer, and you could've stayed in bed just a little longer this morning.

I know that feeling. When I was young, my family lived in Indonesia for a few years, and my mother didn't have the money to send me where all the American kids went to school. So she decided to teach me extra lessons herself, Monday through Friday - at 4:30 in the morning. Now I wasn't too happy about getting up that early. A lot of times, I'd fall asleep right there at the kitchen table. But whenever I'd complain, my mother would just give me one of those looks and say, "This is no picnic for me either, buster."

So I know some of you are still adjusting to being back at school. But I'm here today because I have something important to discuss with you. I'm here because I want to talk with you about your education and what's expected of all of you in this new school year.

Now I've given a lot of speeches about education. And I've talked a lot about responsibility.
I've talked about your teachers' responsibility for inspiring you, and pushing you to learn. I've talked about your parents' responsibility for making sure you stay on track, and get your homework done, and don't spend every waking hour in front of the TV or with that Xbox.

I've talked a lot about your government's responsibility for setting high standards, supporting teachers and principals, and turning around schools that aren't working where students aren't getting the opportunities they deserve.

But at the end of the day, we can have the most dedicated teachers, the most supportive parents, and the best schools in the world - and none of it will matter unless all of you fulfill your responsibilities. Unless you show up to those schools; pay attention to those teachers; listen to your parents, grandparents and other adults; and put in the hard work it takes to succeed.
And that's what I want to focus on today: the responsibility each of you has for your education. I want to start with the responsibility you have to yourself.

Every single one of you has something you're good at. Every single one of you has something to offer. And you have a responsibility to yourself to discover what that is. That's the opportunity an education can provide.

Maybe you could be a good writer - maybe even good enough to write a book or articles in a newspaper - but you might not know it until you write a paper for your English class. Maybe you could be an innovator or an inventor - maybe even good enough to come up with the next iPhone or a new medicine or vaccine - but you might not know it until you do a project for your science class. Maybe you could be a mayor or a Senator or a Supreme Court Justice, but you might not know that until you join student government or the debate team.

And no matter what you want to do with your life - I guarantee that you'll need an education to do it. You want to be a doctor, or a teacher, or a police officer? You want to be a nurse or an architect, a lawyer or a member of our military? You're going to need a good education for every single one of those careers. You can't drop out of school and just drop into a good job. You've got to work for it and train for it and learn for it.

And this isn't just important for your own life and your own future. What you make of your education will decide nothing less than the future of this country. What you're learning in school today will determine whether we as a nation can meet our greatest challenges in the future.

You'll need the knowledge and problem-solving skills you learn in science and math to cure diseases like cancer and AIDS, and to develop new energy technologies and protect our environment. You'll need the insights and critical thinking skills you gain in history and social studies to fight poverty and homelessness, crime and discrimination, and make our nation more fair and more free. You'll need the creativity and ingenuity you develop in all your classes to build new companies that will create new jobs and boost our economy.

We need every single one of you to develop your talents, skills and intellect so you can help solve our most difficult problems. If you don't do that - if you quit on school - you're not just quitting on yourself, you're quitting on your country.

Now I know it's not always easy to do well in school. I know a lot of you have challenges in your lives right now that can make it hard to focus on your schoolwork.

I get it. I know what that's like. My father left my family when I was two years old, and I was raised by a single mother who struggled at times to pay the bills and wasn't always able to give us things the other kids had. There were times when I missed having a father in my life. There were times when I was lonely and felt like I didn't fit in.

So I wasn't always as focused as I should have been. I did some things I'm not proud of, and got in more trouble than I should have. And my life could have easily taken a turn for the worse.

But I was fortunate. I got a lot of second chances and had the opportunity to go to college, and law school, and follow my dreams. My wife, our First Lady Michelle Obama, has a similar story. Neither of her parents had gone to college, and they didn't have much. But they worked hard, and she worked hard, so that she could go to the best schools in this country.

Some of you might not have those advantages. Maybe you don't have adults in your life who give you the support that you need. Maybe someone in your family has lost their job, and there's not enough money to go around. Maybe you live in a neighborhood where you don't feel safe, or have friends who are pressuring you to do things you know aren't right.

But at the end of the day, the circumstances of your life - what you look like, where you come from, how much money you have, what you've got going on at home - that's no excuse for neglecting your homework or having a bad attitude. That's no excuse for talking back to your teacher, or cutting class, or dropping out of school. That's no excuse for not trying.

Where you are right now doesn't have to determine where you'll end up. No one's written your destiny for you. Here in America, you write your own destiny. You make your own future. That's what young people like you are doing every day, all across America.

Young people like Jazmin Perez, from Roma, Texas. Jazmin didn't speak English when she first started school. Hardly anyone in her hometown went to college, and neither of her parents had gone either. But she worked hard, earned good grades, got a scholarship to Brown University, and is now in graduate school, studying public health, on her way to being Dr. Jazmin Perez.

I'm thinking about Andoni Schultz, from Los Altos, California, who's fought brain cancer since he was three. He's endured all sorts of treatments and surgeries, one of which affected his memory, so it took him much longer - hundreds of extra hours - to do his schoolwork. But he never fell behind, and he's headed to college this fall.

And then there's Shantell Steve, from my hometown of Chicago, Illinois. Even when bouncing from foster home to foster home in the toughest neighborhoods, she managed to get a job at a local health center; start a program to keep young people out of gangs; and she's on track to graduate high school with honors and go on to college.

Jazmin, Andoni and Shantell aren't any different from any of you. They faced challenges in their lives just like you do. But they refused to give up. They chose to take responsibility for their education and set goals for themselves. And I expect all of you to do the same.

That's why today, I'm calling on each of you to set your own goals for your education - and to do everything you can to meet them. Your goal can be something as simple as doing all your homework, paying attention in class, or spending time each day reading a book.

Maybe you'll decide to get involved in an extracurricular activity, or volunteer in your community. Maybe you'll decide to stand up for kids who are being teased or bullied because of who they are or how they look, because you believe, like I do, that all kids deserve a safe environment to study and learn. Maybe you'll decide to take better care of yourself so you can be more ready to learn.

And along those lines, I hope you'll all wash your hands a lot, and stay home from school when you don't feel well, so we can keep people from getting the flu this fall and winter.

Whatever you resolve to do, I want you to commit to it. I want you to really work at it.
I know that sometimes, you get the sense from TV that you can be rich and successful without any hard work –– that your ticket to success is through rapping or basketball or being a reality TV star, when chances are, you're not going to be any of those things.

But the truth is, being successful is hard. You won't love every subject you study. You won't click with every teacher. Not every homework assignment will seem completely relevant to your life right this minute. And you won't necessarily succeed at everything the first time you try.

That's OK. Some of the most successful people in the world are the ones who've had the most failures. JK Rowling's first Harry Potter book was rejected twelve times before it was finally published. Michael Jordan was cut from his high school basketball team, and he lost hundreds of games and missed thousands of shots during his career. But he once said, "I have failed over and over and over again in my life. And that is why I succeed."

These people succeeded because they understand that you can't let your failures define you - you have to let them teach you. You have to let them show you what to do differently next time. If you get in trouble, that doesn't mean you're a troublemaker, it means you need to try harder to behave. If you get a bad grade, that doesn't mean you're stupid, it just means you need to spend more time studying.

No one's born being good at things, you become good at things through hard work. You're not a varsity athlete the first time you play a new sport. You don't hit every note the first time you sing a song. You've got to practice. It's the same with your schoolwork. You might have to do a math problem a few times before you get it right, or read something a few times before you understand it, or do a few drafts of a paper before it's good enough to hand in.

Don't be afraid to ask questions. Don't be afraid to ask for help when you need it. I do that every day. Asking for help isn't a sign of weakness, it's a sign of strength. It shows you have the courage to admit when you don't know something, and to learn something new. So find an adult you trust - a parent, grandparent or teacher; a coach or counselor - and ask them to help you stay on track to meet your goals.

And even when you're struggling, even when you're discouraged, and you feel like other people have given up on you - don't ever give up on yourself. Because when you give up on yourself, you give up on your country.

The story of America isn't about people who quit when things got tough. It's about people who kept going, who tried harder, who loved their country too much to do anything less than their best.

It's the story of students who sat where you sit 250 years ago, and went on to wage a revolution and found this nation. Students who sat where you sit 75 years ago who overcame a Depression and won a world war; who fought for civil rights and put a man on the moon. Students who sat where you sit 20 years ago who founded Google, Twitter and Facebook and changed the way we communicate with each other.

So today, I want to ask you, what's your contribution going to be? What problems are you going to solve? What discoveries will you make? What will a president who comes here in twenty or fifty or one hundred years say about what all of you did for this country? Your families, your teachers, and I are doing everything we can to make sure you have the education you need to answer these questions. I'm working hard to fix up your classrooms and get you the books, equipment and computers you need to learn. But you've got to do your part too.

So I expect you to get serious this year. I expect you to put your best effort into everything you do. I expect great things from each of you. So don't let us down - don't let your family or your country or yourself down. Make us all proud. I know you can do it.

Thank you, God bless you, and God bless America.

Link Posted: 9/7/2009 1:12:28 PM EDT
[#44]
Quoted:
Sorry OP, but



I may be wrong, but I don't believe that either Reagan or Bush (either Bush, for that matter) did what Obama is doing.  In fact, I was in school for the entirety of the Ford, Carter, and Reagan administrations, and none of them ever closed-circuited themselves into our classrooms to speak to us.  I'm sure that all three at some point visited a school, but none of them exhibited the creepy arrogance of Obama by inserting themselves into childrens' daily routines.

Fuck Obama.

ETA:  And Nixon's second term, such as it was.  He didn't do it either.

Fuck Obama again.


You were in school for 16 years?
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 1:17:10 PM EDT
[#45]
Quoted:

Quoted:


WHile I dont like Obama the office does carry weight and if the speech was kept in the vein of "stay in school and work hard" I could grudgingly deal with that.

Same here.
 


And that's exactly what it sounded like when I first started reading through the after the speech "plan". But, it turned into way more than what is needed.
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 1:19:56 PM EDT
[#46]
Quoted:
I think it was the Department of Education's little Q&A sessions that it was recommending, following the speech, that has people up in arms. I personally will be calling the schools tomorrow.


THIS

Link Posted: 9/7/2009 1:20:07 PM EDT
[#47]
Quoted:
Neither of those guys were fucking communists, hell bent on destroying the greatest nation in the history of civilization. Next question.


AND THIS
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 1:23:30 PM EDT
[#48]
Quoted:
Might as well pull the race card, you know they will





Recent picture? Even Bush/Reagan recent?
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 1:29:55 PM EDT
[#49]
...
Link Posted: 9/7/2009 1:33:33 PM EDT
[#50]
"Some things have changed..."

"All great change begins at the dinner table..."
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