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Posted: 8/17/2009 4:36:17 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/19/2009 8:30:54 PM EDT by maddog_enigma]
Holy shit is this a depresssing story.  Grey this, ash and rain that.   Grey, dark, wet, cold, etc...

Now, I'm not trying to crap all over the book, but I feel the need to perhaps "vent" a bit, so here goes:

Anyway, I'm not really enjoying it, but for some reason, it is a major page turner.  I can't seem to put it down, perhaps because there are no chapters or anything to break it up.

I also think the writing style is crap.  I do understand and appreciate never giving names to the characters, I get that.  But the conversations back and forth between man and boy are the same drivel over and over and over again.

And in my opinion, there are major holes in the plot.  The kid is what, like 6 or 7 years old?  That would make it approximately seven years since the "unnamed calamity" occured, but yet the "nuclear winter" still hasn't subisded?  And since the kid never grew up in any world but the broken one, how did he ever make it to be as old as he did?  Seems like they are starving and freezing to death every moment of the story.  

Also, how could they be so treadbare as to only have 2 spoons and 2 bullets for the gun?   Seriously,  no matter how unprepared you may find yourself when SHTF, you could surely rummage up more stuff than that.

Thoughts?

Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:39:47 PM EDT
I accidentally caught a spoiler about the ending... It brought me down waaaay to much to read that damned book.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:44:08 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2009 4:44:55 PM EDT by UncivilEngineer]
Well, as time goes on, less stuff to scavenge, so that would explain the hard time surving. Also, it never calls it a nuclear winter. Could be from an asteroid strike or volcano.
I liked the writing style. More realistic than so and so said, he responded, ....
In regards to it being too depressing, I guess you guys never read any Hemingway.






 
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:47:31 PM EDT
Originally Posted By UncivilEngineer:
Well, as time goes on, less stuff to scavenge, so that would explain the hard time surving. Also, it never calls it a nuclear winter. Could be from an asteroid strike or volcano.

I liked the writing style. More realistic than so and so said, he responded, ....

In regards to it being too depressing, I guess you guys never read any Hemingway.
 


This.  I think it was an asteriod strike.  After 6 or 7 years, there isn't going to be much left to scavange with 300 mil people competeing for the now finite resources.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:47:53 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/17/2009 4:48:10 PM EDT by 69cutlass]
I would've delpleted all the resources in that stocked underground bunker they found
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:48:10 PM EDT
as the years go by, bullets get used up, with nobody making anymore. imagine all the riots and skirmishes that would have kicked off in real life. add that to the idea that the man might not have been a gun owner, might have just found the gun one day. not everyone is an arfcommer with an ammofort.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:49:01 PM EDT
my thought?
extremely boring
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:49:35 PM EDT


Keep reading, its got a happy ending.  

Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:50:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By xaaronx:
as the years go by, bullets get used up, with nobody making anymore.  not everyone is an arfcommer with an ammofort.


I suppose.  Still, it's hard for me to relate.  

Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:51:11 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 69cutlass:
I would've delpleted all the resources in that stocked underground bunker they found


This!  They had a lot of supllies there.  I would have hung out there and fattened up as much as I could.  He probably wanted to move on because he knew he was sick and he wanted to get to the coast before it was too late.

Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:53:34 PM EDT
It's not a nuclear winter. ;)

the subject is avoided totally by the author, except for one line...

"There is no prophet in the earth’s long chronicle who is not honored here today."  
to me, this meant of every book, sect, denomination, etc who spoke of disaster, distruction, "the end"..... was correct.

Also, they drank the water throughout the story, and only the "man" was sick, of a respiratory ailment.
That means perhaps dust, ash...

My guess is Supervolcano (yellowstone) or an asteroid.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:53:57 PM EDT
IMO, the man and his son are on their last legs, which is probably why they are on the road going south. What keeps them going when it would be easier to lay down and die?  While the book seems to be quite depressing the end is somewhat uplifting. The lessons and morality passed from the father to the son shows that not all of society has decayed into lawless brutality. It shows that perhaps there is a future in the wake of disaster.  I enjoyed the book and the message.

"We are carrying the fire".
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 4:54:03 PM EDT
Lesson 1. You can never have too much ammo.
Lesson 2. "                                                         "
etc...
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 5:01:43 PM EDT
Originally Posted By maddog_enigma:
Holy shit is this a depresssing story.  Grey this, ash and rain that.   Grey, dark, wet, cold, etc...

<snip>




It never gets better and there is no happy ending. Such is the result of such an incident.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 5:04:14 PM EDT
Originally Posted By RunsWithScissors:
It's not a nuclear winter. ;)

the subject is avoided totally by the author, except for one line...

"There is no prophet in the earth’s long chronicle who is not honored here today."  
to me, this meant of every book, sect, denomination, etc who spoke of disaster, distruction, "the end"..... was correct.

Also, they drank the water throughout the story, and only the "man" was sick, of a respiratory ailment.
That means perhaps dust, ash...

My guess is Supervolcano (yellowstone) or an asteroid.


my thoughts exactly
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 5:29:28 PM EDT
It's one depressing-ass book, but a worthwhile story and read. Although the part about the mother was bs. she sounded like a liberal

I hope they don't fuck up the movie.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 5:33:56 PM EDT
Wasnt it mentioned somewhere in the book about streaks of light in the sky ? I was thinking this mirv
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 5:36:31 PM EDT
When you get to the part with the monkey, you'll shit bricks.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 5:39:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 5:39:50 PM EDT



Originally Posted By maddog_enigma:






Thoughts?





Other than this book sounds like it would make better toilet paper than reading material? Not much.



 
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 5:52:17 PM EDT
It's a very good book.



So is "One Second After".




Link Posted: 8/17/2009 6:05:14 PM EDT
Save yourself some time and put the book away.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 6:09:05 PM EDT
One second after was a tough read. I will admit to having some tears in my eyes at the end of that one.

I also recommend "Lights Out" which is readily availible in PDF format for free on the net. Its another good one, just not nearly as depressing.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 6:15:44 PM EDT

I loved the book.
Wouldnt be that interesting if he had a shopping cart full of wooden crates of 7.62 and a couple of AK's.
There are some movie previews on the web also..
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 6:16:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By UncivilEngineer:
Well, as time goes on, less stuff to scavenge, so that would explain the hard time surving. Also, it never calls it a nuclear winter. Could be from an asteroid strike or volcano.

I liked the writing style. More realistic than so and so said, he responded, ....

In regards to it being too depressing, I guess you guys never read any Hemingway.
 


It's a VERY VERY VERY good book. I can't WAIT to see it in theaters. If the director does justice to the book like the Coen brothers did to No Country For Old Men, then it'll be one hell of a movie.
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 6:58:08 PM EDT
A very good book yes.  Depressing as hell.

The paucity of guns I found very hard to believe.

Trust me, if things are that bad, everyone's going to find a gun by hook or by crook to protect what is theirs, including their lives.

I also found a couple of things just a little hard to believe...

One Second After was a more upbeat book and if you've read it, you will know it's hardly an upbeat novel.

John
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 7:06:52 PM EDT
Huh?  I could've sworn that he mentioned seeing a flash of light outside his window (and then told his wife to fill up the bathtub)...could indicate a nuke strike, or several nuke strikes.  Heck, maybe even a Tunguska event.

The book is a little depressing, but the end is managable.

The health care bill was scarier...
Link Posted: 8/17/2009 7:30:58 PM EDT
Something like Tunguska, only bigger... maybe like the K-T event.

The writing style is not for everyone.  While it's somewhat confusing, it's a much easier read than Faulkner.  

After reading this book, I up-armored my shopping cart, and picked up a spare wheel.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 8:31:55 PM EDT
What. The. Fuck.

That sucked major balls.  I can't believe I wasted so much time reading that crap.  The end was just as shitty as the rest of it.

FUCK YOU CORMAC McCARTHY!!  FUCK YOU!!!!
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 8:33:37 PM EDT
You probably shouldn't read "One Second After," then.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 8:34:04 PM EDT
Originally Posted By sslocal:
It never gets better and there is no happy ending. Such is the result of such an incident.


Now that I'm done, I can wholeheartedly concur with this brief assessment.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 8:43:19 PM EDT
This book is probably closer to post SHTF reality than what many of the Rambos believe.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 8:43:53 PM EDT
Not all books can be rainbows and unicorns...
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:11:20 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Silence:
Not all books can be rainbows and unicorns...


MacGyver doesn't always come out on top. It is a refreshing dose of reality.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:20:26 PM EDT
You'll like this one better.    




http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Heidi
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:23:36 PM EDT
I heard that Old Yeller dies at the end

Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:24:55 PM EDT
Originally Posted By maddog_enigma:
What. The. Fuck.

That sucked major balls.  I can't believe I wasted so much time reading that crap.  The end was just as shitty as the rest of it.

FUCK YOU CORMAC McCARTHY!!  FUCK YOU!!!!


Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:28:45 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 69cutlass:
I would've delpleted all the resources in that stocked underground bunker they found
this. and the ammo woulda come with me to trade...you'd be rich with what was down there.

Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:38:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By wingnutx:
I heard that Old Yeller dies at the end


Where The Red Fern Grows was depressing as fuck.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:39:44 PM EDT
I bought it and made it about 40 or 50 pages and just gave up out of boredom.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:39:50 PM EDT
I saw the previews for The Road and thought it sounded good.  But when I realized who wrote it I wasn't so sure.  I think No Country for Old Men is really overrated.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:44:10 PM EDT



Originally Posted By Swindle1984:



Originally Posted By wingnutx:

I heard that Old Yeller dies at the end




Where The Red Fern Grows was depressing as fuck.


Depressing, but it was a GREAT book.



IIRC, it's been 25-30 years.



 
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:44:34 PM EDT




Originally Posted By Swindle1984:



Originally Posted By wingnutx:

I heard that Old Yeller dies at the end




Where The Red Fern Grows was depressing as fuck.


I reread that again last year and cried again.

Link Posted: 8/19/2009 10:50:15 PM EDT
I said it in the last thread and will say it again. The last couple of pages are a magical, tacked on, happy ending that is at odds with the entire book.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 11:09:58 PM EDT
I lked it.  It had the anti happy ending, happy ending.  As a father, the book has a happy ending for me.  The end justified the means regaurdless of how it was ultimately carried out.

I am not a die hard survivalist.  I have some food stores and have around 2K of rifle rounds (two calibers) and around 1k of pistol rounds (2 calibers).  I hate to say this, but hams law ends once TEOTWAWKI goes down.  As far as God's law, I will pay that price but my wife and kids will not.

Bugging out is the only way to do it, but depending on your city and localation, you may use a shit ton more ammo than you think.  The main character didn't really sound like a gun guy anyway.  I doubt he had many or ammo for them, might have even scrounged up th one he had.

6-7 years is a REAL long time without solid sunlight and good soil.  Who knows about th crap in the rain water depending on what you believe happened.  I'm with Meteor myself.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 11:32:47 PM EDT
I thought some parts were a little slow, and to us Arfcomers the thought of walking the post apocalyptic landscape with a half empty .38 is just ridiculous. I guess the fact that I have a young son made the book hit a little closer to home. It was overall a good read. (The "food" on the spit was very creepy)



A sequel about the guy with the shotgun and his crew would be pretty cool.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 11:39:18 PM EDT
if you want a good TEOTWAWKI story try the 1632 series by Eric Flint (with other authors).  



Instead of a nuclear war, its a cosmic accident which moves a modern town in West Virginia to Germany in 1632.    Very good read and you can download it free from here



http://www.webscription.net//p-379-1632.aspx
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 11:43:15 PM EDT
Originally Posted By monkeyman:
IMO, the man and his son are on their last legs, which is probably why they are on the road going south. What keeps them going when it would be easier to lay down and die?  While the book seems to be quite depressing the end is somewhat uplifting. The lessons and morality passed from the father to the son shows that not all of society has decayed into lawless brutality. It shows that perhaps there is a future in the wake of disaster.  I enjoyed the book and the message.

"We are carrying the fire".

I've never been fond of the claim that society can decay into lawless brutality.

There seems to be very little evidence for it as a conclusion.

Even the worst cesspools of human nature have, over time, improved slightly.

If anything, I'd say that the average person improves significantly under prolonged distress.  People are resilient, and, over all, never respond well to random brutality.
Link Posted: 8/19/2009 11:43:40 PM EDT
Originally Posted By Dino:
if you want a good TEOTWAWKI story try the 1632 series by Eric Flint (with other authors).  

Instead of a nuclear war, its a cosmic accident which moves a modern town in West Virginia to Germany in 1632.    Very good read and you can download it free from here

http://www.webscription.net//p-379-1632.aspx
this was done ever so much better by SM Stirling in his 3 book 'islands in the sea of time' series in which nantucket is whisked back 3000 years. great books, the 1632 series was a bit dry for me.

Link Posted: 8/19/2009 11:47:39 PM EDT
Originally Posted By JBlitzen:
Originally Posted By monkeyman:
IMO, the man and his son are on their last legs, which is probably why they are on the road going south. What keeps them going when it would be easier to lay down and die?  While the book seems to be quite depressing the end is somewhat uplifting. The lessons and morality passed from the father to the son shows that not all of society has decayed into lawless brutality. It shows that perhaps there is a future in the wake of disaster.  I enjoyed the book and the message.

"We are carrying the fire".

I've never been fond of the claim that society can decay into lawless brutality.

There seems to be very little evidence for it as a conclusion.

Even the worst cesspools of human nature have, over time, improved slightly.

If anything, I'd say that the average person improves significantly under prolonged distress.  People are resilient, and, over all, never respond well to random brutality.


I look at LA Riots, Katrina, and hell boston after a loss  It's the have nots that become the aggressors.  Look at our welware system and tell me hwo they think will "Owe" them food, guns, shelter, and above all clean water!

Link Posted: 8/19/2009 11:49:55 PM EDT
I'm three for three on "Not Getting It" when I finish his books.

Anybody want to explain "Blood Meridian" to me?  Evil wins?...
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