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Posted: 12/11/2007 6:12:06 AM EST
I figure about 5 years, generally.

1st 2 years you are a fuzz nutted rookie, 2-5 years you tend to be a little badge heavy.

After about 5 years, you mellow out and develop a little compassion, common sense and a sense of humor.
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:13:44 AM EST
5-6 years of heavy activity. If you work for a small town where you might get two cases a week it's going to take longer.
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:15:10 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2007 6:15:22 AM EST by pyle762]
Pretty close, although I was over the badge heavyniess within 3 years.
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:22:00 AM EST
Depends on your age and life experience when you go into the job. The 21 year old takes far more time to acclimate to the peculiarities of the job than the 30 year old.
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:26:41 AM EST
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:30:35 AM EST
I've always felt that GOOD cops are made and not born.

It's a difficult field of business to go into.

The NY cop that checked me out the other night when I 'Stevie Wondered" through the toll probably was a pretty good cop.

I was reported as being blind, no doubt, so the officer simply tailed me for a little while, passed me, shined a flashlight on my face. When I turned and faced him, he figured I was NOT blind, so he drove off. He probably chuckled.

Had he been a rookie or a badge heavy cop, I'd have been pulled over and had '20 questions' played with me.

It generally takes a while to sort out the bullshit and become a halfway decent cop.

Incidentally, I consider it to be more of an art than a science, as there are many, many situations that arise where there is no simple pat solution, and individual judgement is paramont.

Generally speaking I respect the working cop, but I really have doubts about police management.

I have commented on the need for civillian review boards, but not for the reasons most people think of.

I think that the civillian review boards should be there to keep the working cop from being thrown to the wolves by overzealous, politically minded supervisors looking to cover their asses and climb the political ladder at the working cop's expense. After all, there are probably more than enough legal remedies out there to keep the working cop in line.
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:37:11 AM EST

Originally Posted By Wave:
Define "good"




That's a good cop.
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:39:45 AM EST
10 pages

2 bans

IBTL

Popcorn at the ready
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:45:43 AM EST

Originally Posted By Wave:
Define "good"



Seasoned. A cop that knows how to minimize/defuse a situation.

A cop that understands that he is there to help people, as opposed to simply generate revenue and bust people.

The catch bad guys part of policework is somewhat over rated. Police serve a far broader purpose than protecting us from criminals.

They actually protect society from itself. without the police, we'd have chaos for a system, lynchings and people being beated up based on mere allegations.

Cops serve a far broader purpose than we realize.

A good cop can walk into a domestic situation and defuse it, and nobody goes to jail. A horse's ass of a cop will walk into the same situation and create a riot that will fill 6 Paddy wagons chock-a-block full.
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:49:09 AM EST

How long does it take to maqke a pretty good cop?


Pretty....You said Pretty...
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:49:52 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/11/2007 6:50:23 AM EST by Old_Painless]
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:50:56 AM EST
100 years. That's why you never see any.

Link Posted: 12/11/2007 6:54:27 AM EST

Originally Posted By Old_Painless:

He said, "That doesn't matter. Some guys have 3 year's experience and others have one year's experience three times."




Lot to be said here.

IMHO, I know an officer with 1 years of experience over 25 times!
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 7:05:33 AM EST

Originally Posted By piccolo:

Originally Posted By Wave:
Define "good"




They actually protect society from itself.


Seems to be the way alot of legislators think in regards to firearms/gun owernership.



Link Posted: 12/11/2007 7:09:12 AM EST

Generally speaking I respect the working cop, but I really have doubts about police management.

I have commented on the need for civillian review boards, but not for the reasons most people think of.

I think that the civillian review boards should be there to keep the working cop from being thrown to the wolves by overzealous, politically minded supervisors looking to cover their asses and climb the political ladder at the working cop's expense. After all, there are probably more than enough legal remedies out there to keep the working cop in line.



QFT
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 7:20:09 AM EST
When I was new, an old salt told me that it takes about five years to become a seasoned cop. I scoffed, I knew it all.

Now after 23 years, I know he was about right, five years.
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 8:20:10 AM EST
I'm going to go with the five year mark as well. I think it comes a bit faster for guys that get on the job with some maturity and life experience.

I'm a bit biased, but I also think it also comes faster for city cops in that experience comes in wider varieties and greater amounts. 20 to 30 jobs night after night will season you up real quick. My guess is that guys assigned to highway-type LE jobs for instance don't get the same variety and amount of jobs.

One thing that is always underrated is paperwork. A good street cop is able to consistently produce reports that help citizens in mundane matters and provide an adequate basis for subsequent investigations in other instances. Quality reports also protect the cop from administrative hassles, lawsuits and complaints. My cops will tell you that its something I harp on often!
Link Posted: 12/11/2007 8:25:18 AM EST
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