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Posted: 12/11/2010 6:23:57 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/12/2010 6:12:09 PM EDT by HardShell]
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:24:38 AM EDT
You're going to make me Google this, aren't you?
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:27:09 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2010 6:28:03 AM EDT by HardShell]
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:27:41 AM EDT
Originally Posted By HardShell:



I know we have a quite few grammar sticklers here.

I just wondered if any are as dogmatic as I tend to be WRT the Oxford comma.

Thanks.




Well, speaking for me, myself, and I, I prefer its use.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:28:10 AM EDT
Somewhere along the line I was taught not to do that. I'm not a grammar stickler though.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:28:33 AM EDT
Sometimes.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:28:44 AM EDT
Okay, I Googled it. I'm in favor of it.

It better matches the spoken cadence of sentences, and it sometimes resolves ambiguity.

Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:28:52 AM EDT
When using a pen or pencil I don't follow the Oxford comma convention in order to save ink.

On a computer, cellphone or iPad, meh. It's just electrons.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:29:11 AM EDT
My 8th grade englush teacher ruined me on commas. I got chewed to pieces my first 2 years in college.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:29:24 AM EDT
I'm a serial comma killer, and I know it.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:29:44 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:34:23 AM EDT
I like it. I've never heard of it, but I can figure what it is.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:35:39 AM EDT
My english teachers were sticklers for it, so I've always used it.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:36:44 AM EDT
We aren't in Blighty; it's the Harvard comma.

Harvard comma all the way.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:38:18 AM EDT
This reminds me of why I used to want to gouge my eyeballs out, with rusty spoons, in English class.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:53:08 AM EDT
It doesn't matter. We'll all be speaking Spanish in a few years anyway.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:54:04 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 6:57:44 AM EDT
I was taught to use it, so I do. Leaving it out looks incorrect to me.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 7:33:07 AM EDT
I prefer the William Shatner comma.

You, know, like, this!
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 7:40:42 AM EDT
Always.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 7:42:24 AM EDT
It's how I was taught.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 7:46:23 AM EDT


Use it when appropriate for clarity.

Don't use it when it introduces confusion into the sentence.

Link Posted: 12/11/2010 7:47:59 AM EDT
Well, if you ask me, I would say that I'm in favor, as it does help to alleviate the problems that some readers have in knowing when to pause, especially as it relates to dialogue.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:02:54 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2010 8:05:50 AM EDT by Fatbert]
I use it, particularly when writing out a list of things like this:

He drank a martini, bourbon and Coke, and four beers.

When you have something like "bourbon and Coke" that includes the word "and," I feel that the comma is necessary to keep it from looking like this:

He drank one martini, bourbon and Coke and four beers.

Now, are you saying that he drank one martini, one bourbon, one Cokes and four beers, or are you saying that he had one martini, then one drink that contained bourbon and Coke, and then four beers? It serves to make things clearer.

It also signals that the word "and" is necessary, as in "Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago, and Cuba..." Without the Oxford comma we don't know if writing "Jamaica, Trinidad and Tobago and Cuba" is a mistake, ie: whether the person meant to list "Trinidad and Tobago" as one group, or whether it was supposed to read "Jamaica, Trinidad, Tobago and Cuba..."
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:04:43 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Subnet:
Okay, I Googled it. I'm in favor of it.

It better matches the spoken cadence of sentences, and it sometimes resolves ambiguity.





This, exactly.

Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:05:27 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2010 8:05:42 AM EDT by 53vortec]
I endorse its' proper use - yet I'm a frequent abuser of the hyphen.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:07:59 AM EDT



I don't know what the hell you fellers are yapping about. Sound like one of them things that you have to use while sipping your tea with your pinky finger all stuck out.

Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:13:48 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Aptrgangr:
Somewhere along the line I was taught not to do that. I'm not a grammar stickler though.


Me, too...and w/o reads more like the way you actually say/pronounce it.

Now, what about 2 spaces vs. 1 after periods???
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:17:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Dave_Markowitz:
I prefer the William Shatner comma.

You, know, like, this!

I could actually hear his voice.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:17:49 AM EDT
Not sure. I'd like to see which way sugerbear goes on this one before I cast my vote.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:21:32 AM EDT
After reading the wikipedia article about it, I'm in favor of it.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:22:01 AM EDT
I feel like I over use it, but I'm not going to stop.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:22:10 AM EDT
From The Times:
... highlights of his global tour include encounters with Nelson Mandela, an 800-year-old demigod and a dildo collector.


An Oxford Comma would fix that right up. I always use them.

I also follow the technical/British style of punctuation around quotes: if it is part of the quote, I include it inside the quotations marks; otherwise I leave it outside. The President's English calls for punctuation to always be inside the quotes.

And two spaces after a sentence stop. Yes, advanced typography can do a proper "wide space", but that isn't universal and I really don't care for auto-correct WYSIWYG features like that.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:27:41 AM EDT
I prefer the ampersand actually..
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:27:44 AM EDT
Originally Posted By Subnet:
Okay, I Googled it. I'm in favor of it.

It better matches the spoken cadence of sentences, and it sometimes resolves ambiguity.



COMMA SPLICE!!!
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:29:26 AM EDT
Always
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:31:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By HardShell:



I know we have a quite few grammar sticklers here.

I just wondered if any are as dogmatic as I tend to be WRT the Oxford comma.

Thanks.





It enhances clarity, which is a strong argument for always using it. We no longer manually set type, so it costs nothing to use it. Use it.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:34:52 AM EDT
I use it. Just seems natural.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:37:47 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2010 8:38:07 AM EDT by corwin1968]
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:37:59 AM EDT
I always use it.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:38:05 AM EDT
Absolutely.

Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:42:47 AM EDT
It was beaten in to me all through school. So I try and use it.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:43:48 AM EDT
I think I have been able to deduce that this thread is about the debate between whether the word and" before the last item listed in a series serves as a replacement for the comma, or should be in addition to the comma. Am I on track?

He eats, shoots and leaves.

Versus...

He eats, shoots, and leaves.

Of course, all as opposed to: He eats shoots and leaves. That is right out.

I like the comma together with the "and." I agree it often provides added clarity.

Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:45:37 AM EDT
I use it. I cannot find a reason against it.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:46:05 AM EDT
I try to use it. Grammer was never a strong thing for me.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:49:03 AM EDT
I use it. I was taught to use it way back in the day. Sometimes when I'm reading a list of things ("A, B and C"), I occasionally think that B and C are to be treated as a single element. I don't have that problem when you say "A, B, and C."
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:50:36 AM EDT
I don't need it, I don't want it, I think it's an affront to civilized grammar, and I will have no part of it.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:51:02 AM EDT
Originally Posted By pavlovwolf:
Well, if you ask me, I would say that I'm in favor, as it does help to alleviate the problems that some readers have in knowing when to pause, especially as it relates to dialogue.
Agree. Also, when I was a child we were taught to use a comma before "and & but". Today, I rarely see that. Another thing that is recently acceptable is to begin a sentence with "But".

Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:51:11 AM EDT

Originally Posted By zeekh:
I try to use it. Grammer was never a strong thing for me.

No shit!
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 8:58:39 AM EDT
It tightens my colon.
Link Posted: 12/11/2010 9:00:22 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/11/2010 9:00:31 AM EDT by KILLERB6]
Only on ARFCOM GD, could we entertain ourselves this much, with a comma.
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