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Posted: 9/21/2010 5:20:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2010 5:37:00 AM EST by delemorte]
I did not have the pleasure of knowing Paul but his wife is a dear freind of my wifes and her family. Paul left behind a loving wife and unborn child. He will be missed and we thank him and his family for their sacrifice so that we can be free..

This is something written by Paul that moved me and i wanted to share.


Paul’s letter to the editor – Published 3/24/06 in the Washington Times



I was fascinated to watch the exchange between actor Richard Belzer and Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen ("Into the lion's den," Inside Politics, March 26, 2006). I have completed four combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. I participated in the initial invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 and parachuted into Iraq three years ago this month. Most recently, I had the privilege of leading an infantry company in Mosul, Iraq. I use this as context, not authority, because, according to Mr. Belzer, participating in a conflict indicates a lack of understanding.

When I was younger, my father made me read a book by James Michener, "The Bridges at Toko-Ri." When I finished, I told him the book was about naval aviators during the Korean War. He looked at me a little disappointed and told me I had missed the point. The book to him was not about pilots or the Korean War — it was about the bravery of men. At the end of the book, the captain of an aircraft carrier is watching his men suit up for yet another mission when he asks himself out loud, "Where do we get such men?

Why is America lucky enough to have such men?" Today, while actors and talk-show hosts see fit to broadly characterize the men and women of the armed forces as "19- and 20-year-old kids who couldn't get a job," we should be asking the same question.
I wish Bill Maher, Richard Belzer and the young adults of my generation who comment from campuses and talk shows all over the country and mistake knowledge for understanding could see what's really happening over there. I welcome their right to disagree, but I wish they would educate themselves well enough to disagree intelligently.

They should see a 22-year-old spend two hours sitting on a hard concrete floor negotiating an electricity contract or generator plan only to hit an improvised explosive device emplaced by the very people he seeks to help; a 19-year-old female medic advise a 19-year-old Iraqi mother on how to treat her child's ear infection; or men still dazed from a bomb blast that killed a friend and wounded seven others return from a mission and roll up their sleeves to give blood for the wounded, then clean the blood out of their vehicle to do a night patrol.
They do it without ceremony or formality; they do it because it is their job and they are driven by sense of purpose few in other professions can understand.

"Where do we get such men?" From all over — not just America, but from many other countries, but I know for sure the dedication required to do what they do every day is equal to the demands of any "real job."
Capt. Paul Carron, U.S. Army, Fort Lewis, Wash.


http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13904

Edit to reflect current Rank.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:31:26 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:33:06 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2010 5:44:07 AM EST by DnPRK]
RIP Major
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:35:32 AM EST
Damn.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:38:43 AM EST
Originally Posted By delemorte:
I did not have the pleasure of knowing Paul but his wife is a dear freind of my wifes and her family. Paul left behind a loving wife and unborn child. He will be missed and we thank him and his family for their sacrifice so that we can be free..

This is something written by Paul that moved me and i wanted to share.


Paul’s letter to the editor – Published 3/24/06 in the Washington Times



I was fascinated to watch the exchange between actor Richard Belzer and Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen ("Into the lion's den," Inside Politics, March 26, 2006). I have completed four combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. I participated in the initial invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 and parachuted into Iraq three years ago this month. Most recently, I had the privilege of leading an infantry company in Mosul, Iraq. I use this as context, not authority, because, according to Mr. Belzer, participating in a conflict indicates a lack of understanding.

When I was younger, my father made me read a book by James Michener, "The Bridges at Toko-Ri." When I finished, I told him the book was about naval aviators during the Korean War. He looked at me a little disappointed and told me I had missed the point. The book to him was not about pilots or the Korean War — it was about the bravery of men. At the end of the book, the captain of an aircraft carrier is watching his men suit up for yet another mission when he asks himself out loud, "Where do we get such men?

Why is America lucky enough to have such men?" Today, while actors and talk-show hosts see fit to broadly characterize the men and women of the armed forces as "19- and 20-year-old kids who couldn't get a job," we should be asking the same question.
I wish Bill Maher, Richard Belzer and the young adults of my generation who comment from campuses and talk shows all over the country and mistake knowledge for understanding could see what's really happening over there. I welcome their right to disagree, but I wish they would educate themselves well enough to disagree intelligently.

They should see a 22-year-old spend two hours sitting on a hard concrete floor negotiating an electricity contract or generator plan only to hit an improvised explosive device emplaced by the very people he seeks to help; a 19-year-old female medic advise a 19-year-old Iraqi mother on how to treat her child's ear infection; or men still dazed from a bomb blast that killed a friend and wounded seven others return from a mission and roll up their sleeves to give blood for the wounded, then clean the blood out of their vehicle to do a night patrol.
They do it without ceremony or formality; they do it because it is their job and they are driven by sense of purpose few in other professions can understand.

"Where do we get such men?" From all over — not just America, but from many other countries, but I know for sure the dedication required to do what they do every day is equal to the demands of any "real job."
Capt. Paul Carron, U.S. Army, Fort Lewis, Wash.


http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13904

Edit to reflect current Rank.


Where indeed. Thanks for that, and be sure to pass along our condolences.

Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:42:52 AM EST
We just got word that Paul made it home yesterday and will be laid to rest in Arlington.

I weep for his wife and his unborn child.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:45:53 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2010 5:48:22 AM EST by Wobblin-Goblin]
I feel your pain. One of my classmates (SSGT Joe Phanuef) was KIA in Afghanistan December 15, 2006.



I don't believe whatever is going on over there is worth the price.

Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:47:42 AM EST
Originally Posted By delemorte:
We just got word that Paul made it home yesterday and will be laid to rest in Arlington.

I weep for his wife and his unborn child.


Let them know that if they need anything while in the area to let you know. VAHTF will INSIST on doing anything we can.

Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:49:00 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:55:32 AM EST
Rest in peace.




Link Posted: 9/21/2010 5:59:44 AM EST
Originally Posted By Prime:
Originally Posted By delemorte:
We just got word that Paul made it home yesterday and will be laid to rest in Arlington.

I weep for his wife and his unborn child.


Let them know that if they need anything while in the area to let you know. VAHTF will INSIST on doing anything we can.



The offer has been extended.. If anything comes up i will let VAHTF know what is needed.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:03:44 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2010 6:09:36 AM EST by Skg_Mre_Lght]
Rest Easy, Sir.

Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:08:05 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:08:24 AM EST
Sad
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:11:09 AM EST
RIP. war is ugly business.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:22:47 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:29:36 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:32:18 AM EST
God Bless. "Where do we get these Men"?
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:35:10 AM EST
Originally Posted By c350z:



RIP Soldier.

There were a lot of attacks on election day in Afghanistan this year.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:35:35 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2010 8:00:25 AM EST by skygod]

Originally Posted By delemorte:
I did not have the pleasure of knowing Paul but his wife is a dear freind of my wifes and her family. Paul left behind a loving wife and unborn child. He will be missed and we thank him and his family for their sacrifice so that we can be free..

This is something written by Paul that moved me and i wanted to share.


Paul’s letter to the editor – Published 3/24/06 in the Washington Times



I was fascinated to watch the exchange between actor Richard Belzer and Rep. Ileana Ros-Lehtinen ("Into the lion's den," Inside Politics, March 26, 2006). I have completed four combat tours in Iraq and Afghanistan. I participated in the initial invasion of Afghanistan in 2001 and parachuted into Iraq three years ago this month. Most recently, I had the privilege of leading an infantry company in Mosul, Iraq. I use this as context, not authority, because, according to Mr. Belzer, participating in a conflict indicates a lack of understanding.

When I was younger, my father made me read a book by James Michener, "The Bridges at Toko-Ri." When I finished, I told him the book was about naval aviators during the Korean War. He looked at me a little disappointed and told me I had missed the point. The book to him was not about pilots or the Korean War — it was about the bravery of men. At the end of the book, the captain of an aircraft carrier is watching his men suit up for yet another mission when he asks himself out loud, "Where do we get such men?

Why is America lucky enough to have such men?" Today, while actors and talk-show hosts see fit to broadly characterize the men and women of the armed forces as "19- and 20-year-old kids who couldn't get a job," we should be asking the same question.
I wish Bill Maher, Richard Belzer and the young adults of my generation who comment from campuses and talk shows all over the country and mistake knowledge for understanding could see what's really happening over there. I welcome their right to disagree, but I wish they would educate themselves well enough to disagree intelligently.

They should see a 22-year-old spend two hours sitting on a hard concrete floor negotiating an electricity contract or generator plan only to hit an improvised explosive device emplaced by the very people he seeks to help; a 19-year-old female medic advise a 19-year-old Iraqi mother on how to treat her child's ear infection; or men still dazed from a bomb blast that killed a friend and wounded seven others return from a mission and roll up their sleeves to give blood for the wounded, then clean the blood out of their vehicle to do a night patrol.
They do it without ceremony or formality; they do it because it is their job and they are driven by sense of purpose few in other professions can understand.

"Where do we get such men?" From all over — not just America, but from many other countries, but I know for sure the dedication required to do what they do every day is equal to the demands of any "real job."
Capt. Paul Carron, U.S. Army, Fort Lewis, Wash.


http://www.defense.gov/releases/release.aspx?releaseid=13904

Edit to reflect current Rank.

Airborne, Sir.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:37:21 AM EST
Originally Posted By Prime:
Originally Posted By delemorte:
We just got word that Paul made it home yesterday and will be laid to rest in Arlington.

I weep for his wife and his unborn child.


Let them know that if they need anything while in the area to let you know. VAHTF will INSIST on doing anything we can.



Amen. RIP, Major.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:41:01 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2010 6:44:26 AM EST by PlaneJane]
Requiescat in pace, Major.


Jane
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:43:59 AM EST
RIP Major, the world is a better place because you lived.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:44:05 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:45:33 AM EST
Thank you Major for your support of liberty and giving your life for our freedoms.

Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:49:28 AM EST


RIP Major.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 6:58:50 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/21/2010 10:19:20 AM EST by BillofRights]
The sum total of every single Afghan, does not approach the worth of one Man such as Major Paul Carron.

God bless the American Men and Woman who are willing to try those people.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 7:08:42 AM EST
He died during the elections. If it's any consolation, his actions, and those of my comrades in arms allowed the Afghan people to have a voice in their government. There was a 40% turnout at the polls, over twice what we had in the U.S. in 2008. That's gotta count for something.
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 7:14:00 AM EST
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 7:25:17 AM EST
I don't even know what to say...words can't touch the way my heart breaks every time I read similiar articles.

R.I.P Major
Link Posted: 9/21/2010 8:18:27 AM EST
Link Posted: 10/5/2010 7:03:59 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/5/2010 7:24:02 AM EST by delemorte]
More info on the Major and his Military accomplishments.. A damn fine soldier..

http://www.wbtv.com/Global/story.asp?S=13207364



CHARLOTTE, NC (WBTV) - A memorial service is being held Friday morning for a soldier with Charlotte connections, who died from injuries he sustained while serving in Afghanistan.

According to the Department of Defense, 33-year-old Major Paul D. Carron from Missouri died on Saturday in Qalat, Afghanistan from "injuries sustained in a non-combat related incident."


Major Carron was assigned to the 2nd Squadron, 2nd Stryker Cavalry Regiment and was stationed in Vilseck, Germany. Carron served as the squadron executive officer and had been deployed in support of Operation Enduring Freedom since June 2010.

Major Carron had a long attachment to North Carolina, both growing up on Fort Bragg and the surrounding community.

Major Carron was commissioned as a second lieutenant in infantry in 1999 and has served in a variety of assignments to include platoon leader for the 82nd Airborne Division; platoon leader and XO for the 3/75 Ranger Regiment; company commander for the 25th Infantry Division; company commander for the 5th Ranger Training Brigade; S-3 and executive officer for the 2nd Battalion, 2nd Stryker Regiment.

Carron's wife, Susan Abernathy Carron, is a native of Charlotte and her parents still live in town. The couple has a daughter, Madeline, and are expecting a second child, Luke.

Major Carron is remembered as a loving father, husband, son and brother. He was an avid outdoors sportsman, devoted friend, and dedicated officer and soldier, who devoted his life to his family, the United States Army and to the interests of the United States of America.

A memorial service will be held at 10 a.m. Friday, in the John F. Kennedy Memorial Chapel on Fort Bragg.

Interment with military honors will be held at Arlington National Cemetery at a later date.

An educational trust fund is being created for Madeline and Luke through USAA, sponsored by members of West Point Class of 1999. In lieu of flowers, memorials may be made to the The Warrior Foundation.

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