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Posted: 2/21/2007 5:49:13 PM EST
looking for opinions, not looking for a GI gun just a fun shooter. i found one local for 399, its got wear but no real dents or dings. looks like this: http://webpages.charter.net/m.eddelman/u_m1_scoped.jpg minus the scope of course and with more wear on the finish/stock.
Link Posted: 2/21/2007 5:52:45 PM EST
They are fun shooters. I used to have one and it never gave me a single problem. It was accurate and fun to shoot. The one you are looking at is way overpriced IMO, I paid less than half that.
Link Posted: 2/21/2007 7:19:13 PM EST
thats what i figured. :( after some quick looking at my main dealer they list the auto ordnance carbines around 600.
Link Posted: 2/22/2007 7:29:13 AM EST
[Last Edit: 2/22/2007 7:30:07 AM EST by BSTOCK]

Originally Posted By Blk89GT:
thats what i figured. :( after some quick looking at my main dealer they list the auto ordnance carbines around 600.


I just picked one up from Gunbroker (NIB) for $604 shipped. I could have got it a little cheaper but the guy took only cashiers checks or MOs. I don't care how much feeback you have I am not sending a MO to a stranger 2000 miles away.

Edited to add: It was Auto Ordnance.
Link Posted: 2/22/2007 11:59:12 AM EST

Originally Posted By Blk89GT:
looking for opinions, not looking for a GI gun just a fun shooter. i found one local for 399, its got wear but no real dents or dings. looks like this: http://webpages.charter.net/m.eddelman/u_m1_scoped.jpg minus the scope of course and with more wear on the finish/stock.



The early production universals are ok but watch out for the ones with the dual spring setup. If the one you are looking at has the single spring, its a good one.

The later two spring version is unsafe.

Quote from Jouster.com




The problem is that the later you go into production and including probably all the latest ones with two operating springs and a stamped operating rod with a cam window cut into it, the machining got sloppier and sloppier and the design and manufacturing fell apart safety wise.

Universal did away with the USGI design receiver bridge firing pin retraction cam surfaces, the USGI design firing pin retraction tang, and eventually the USGI design hammer camming surfaces on the rear of the bolt that also protect the firing pin from the hammer until full lock up. They went to a firing pin with no retraction tang.

The actual problems are that a number of them FIRE UNLOCKED. You then have 40,000 PSI unleased in your face. Not good.



Link Posted: 2/25/2007 9:57:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:

Originally Posted By Blk89GT:
looking for opinions, not looking for a GI gun just a fun shooter. i found one local for 399, its got wear but no real dents or dings. looks like this: http://webpages.charter.net/m.eddelman/u_m1_scoped.jpg minus the scope of course and with more wear on the finish/stock.



The early production universals are ok but watch out for the ones with the dual spring setup. If the one you are looking at has the single spring, its a good one.

The later two spring version is unsafe.

Quote from Jouster.com




The problem is that the later you go into production and including probably all the latest ones with two operating springs and a stamped operating rod with a cam window cut into it, the machining got sloppier and sloppier and the design and manufacturing fell apart safety wise.

Universal did away with the USGI design receiver bridge firing pin retraction cam surfaces, the USGI design firing pin retraction tang, and eventually the USGI design hammer camming surfaces on the rear of the bolt that also protect the firing pin from the hammer until full lock up. They went to a firing pin with no retraction tang.

The actual problems are that a number of them FIRE UNLOCKED. You then have 40,000 PSI unleased in your face. Not good.





By looking at one, how would I know if it is the earlier version or the later? There is one for sale locally and I just want to know if it would be a very bad idea.
Link Posted: 2/25/2007 11:05:00 PM EST
the price sounds high.......is it brand new? I had an Iver Johnson that was a good gun, same as Universal, same company - different name, but I would look to pay $350 range for one. Parts are hard to come by.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 4:57:50 PM EST
"By looking at one, how would I know if it is the earlier version or the later? There is one for sale locally and I just want to know if it would be a very bad idea."

The easiest way to detect a later Universal is to look at the op rod.
The later Universal has a stamped op rod with a cutout in the bolt cam area.
You can actually see the bolt's locking lug in the cutout.

The earlier Universal has a GI type op rod that's considerably heavier and is solid steel.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 6:03:51 PM EST
The other problem with Universals was soft steel. Friend had one. Bought it new back in the seventies. After about a thousand rounds the thing literally wore out. You could see where bearing surfaces were peening over and wearing away.

Universals are best avoided unless you know exactly what you are getting into.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 6:38:11 PM EST
$399 is way too much for any Universal. If you had a new in the box early model, I might pay $299 on a good day. And that was before I knew the CMP carbines were coming out.
Link Posted: 2/26/2007 7:20:59 PM EST

Originally Posted By Quake_Guy:
$399 is way too much for any Universal. If you had a new in the box early model, I might pay $299 on a good day. And that was before I knew the CMP carbines were coming out.


$399 is not a bad price for a universal ive seen em sold for $100 by a guy furstrated with his. Keep in mind CMP will be selling USGI carbines estimated price is to be based on "fair market value" according to the CMP so $500-700.
Link Posted: 2/27/2007 2:34:30 AM EST
I bought a plainfield on gun borker, well see if it is worth it.
Link Posted: 2/27/2007 4:29:49 AM EST

Originally Posted By pinkmist:
I bought a plainfield on gun borker, well see if it is worth it.


Plainfields are the best of the civilian carbines, pretty much mil-spec compatible. If you find a nice one thats been sitting in someones closet for the last forty years, grab it!

I'm presently keeping an eye out for one to use as a general around shooter and truck gun.



** Remember only GI 15rd mags can be considered reliable, if it malfunctions with a 30rder don't blame the gun.
Link Posted: 2/27/2007 5:20:24 AM EST

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:


** Remember only GI 15rd mags can be considered reliable, if it malfunctions with a 30rder don't blame the gun.



Wrong.. if it malfunctions with a GI 30 rounder.. you might just neesd the mag catch with the protrusion that was designed for use with 30rnd mags.....
Link Posted: 2/27/2007 3:20:45 PM EST

Originally Posted By HighPowerShooter:

Originally Posted By NH_AR_Shooter:


** Remember only GI 15rd mags can be considered reliable, if it malfunctions with a 30rder don't blame the gun.



Wrong.. if it malfunctions with a GI 30 rounder.. you might just need the mag catch with the protrusion that was designed for use with 30rnd mags.....


Not wrong. The GI 15rd mags will work well in every carbine, no matter what make, vintage, mag catch, etc, this cant be said for GI 30 rounders.

Even with the correct catch the GI 30 round mags often malfunction. There is a fix that involves a stronger spring. The GI 30rd springs were marginal when new...Don't be surprised if a 50+ year old mag needs a little help. Thirty+ years ago I ran ran into this problem with new in wrapper GI 30rd mags, I have never ever had a problem with the GI 15 rounders.

At least the genuine 30rd mags can be made to work reliably.

Commercial crap 30 rounders often cant be made to work period.


** I'll post a link to the mag fix later, if I can find it.

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