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9/19/2017 7:27:10 PM
Posted: 1/9/2002 7:37:30 AM EDT
I am considering building a low budget tac course on our wooded property in Central Texas. I am considering using the dry gully that runs through it (~100 feet wide 15 foot walls). Any tips on targets to use (aside from standard torso targets) that would be fun to shoot. Also if there is anybody who has done this sort of thing what are you tips/experiences.

thanks.
Link Posted: 1/9/2002 7:41:55 AM EDT
Make a rough sketch, with dimensions, of the land and terrain.

Strategically but carefully place the umbrellas/chairs/watercoolers and cots.

When phase one is completed proceed with target placement.

Link Posted: 1/9/2002 8:12:46 AM EDT
I was just on the Maryland AR site and they had an interesting prop.

Its half a slanted roof top...I am going to have to make one for my club now.
Link Posted: 1/9/2002 8:39:15 AM EDT

Originally Posted By ar15bubba:
I am considering building a low budget tac course on our wooded property in Central Texas. I am considering using the dry gully that runs through it (~100 feet wide 15 foot walls). Any tips on targets to use (aside from standard torso targets) that would be fun to shoot. Also if there is anybody who has done this sort of thing what are you tips/experiences.

thanks.


I know exactly the terain you've described.
And I'm jealous !

Stormbringers idea is a good one. If you're really going to spend a lot if time out there do put up some sort of shelter.

So far as targets these are only limited by your imagination and finances. Obviously mechanized are the most fun and the most challenging but are also the most expensive.

Link Posted: 1/9/2002 9:18:30 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/9/2002 9:26:10 AM EDT by Stormbringer]
5subslr5 you missunderstood.


The half roof is a shooting platform.
It simulates shooting from a typical suburban rooftop!!

Talk about politically Incorrect!!

LOL

Here is the pic

Note the Mini 14s leaning against the prop...not my idea of safe.
Link Posted: 1/9/2002 9:43:09 AM EDT
1. The first and most important thing to have with any shooting area is a suitable backstop, or berm, that is taller than your shoothouse.

2. Build the exterior walls solid enough to support the structure so you can have flimsy interior walls that you can easily change around every few months/weeks.

3. The more doorways the better. If your berm/backstop allows try and build the structure that you can shoot in at least 180 degrees. A 360 degree shoothouse is even better if you can pull it off. Make sure you have a few opposing doorways so that you could have a threat target to the left and right of the shooter at the same time.

4. Try and make the hallways tight. Most homes have halls that are only 36 inches wide so your course should mimic that.

5. Lots of small rooms can be better practice than a few big ones.

6. Targets; I found a standard IPSC or IDPA target stapled to a 4"x4" makes a great reactive target (falling when shot is placed in kill zone). Place the 4"x4" where the spine would be located and have it run head to waist level. Support the 4"x4" on a stand to make target average human height. Be sure to identify good and bad guys. Remember more targets aren't always best. Keep it real, keep it simple. Moving targets can come latter.

7. I'm sure i'll come up with more latter....

8. Have fun, train hard and most importantly...be safe

_____________________________________
Domari Nolo
Link Posted: 1/9/2002 10:11:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Stormbringer:
5subslr5 you missunderstood.


The half roof is a shooting platform.
It simulates shooting from a typical suburban rooftop!!

Talk about politically Incorrect!!

LOL

Here is the pic

Note the Mini 14s leaning against the prop...not my idea of safe.


Hadn't seen one before - sorry for the error.

If this was for anything serious I would say get it up to two story's high.

Height changes things.
Link Posted: 1/9/2002 10:20:08 AM EDT
Good point but I think that the ground level one makes it easier to transition to other parts of the stage. It will at least give you practice in setting up for the shot.
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