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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/15/2005 1:08:05 AM EDT
friend has an old M14 that he would like to get a pistol-grip synthetic stock for. i told him i would look for one but so far i've found nadda. i'm no expert, so has anyone heard of such a thing for these rifles? TIA.
Link Posted: 9/15/2005 1:40:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/15/2005 1:43:33 AM EDT by Noname]
Link Posted: 9/15/2005 5:06:32 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/15/2005 5:07:14 AM EDT by Captn_Jerry]
This is probably what he is looking for:
E2/M2A Stock

CJ
Link Posted: 9/15/2005 7:16:39 AM EDT
Why do many of the description say it must be bedded. It that for a match req, or for ideal super duper accuracy. Can one just not toss the receiver in there and go?
Does 'must' mean MUST, or 'must' mean SHOULD?
Link Posted: 9/15/2005 7:53:13 AM EDT
The GI stock has what is called a "Stockliner" that secured via the two fasteners that are exposed on the outside of the stock. This steel insert mates with the receiver and locates the rifle. the trigger assembly then joins with the receiver.
Almost ALL aftermarket stocks do not have an allocation for this liner.
A GI M14A1 (or as civilians say M14E2) has a stockliner and has a pistolgrip. This configuration does not require any bedding. Bedding is optional.
The aftermarket stocks have a simple receptacle in the action area, and REQUIRE bedding. This should be done by a skilled individual. If you are handy, it can be done yourself. The bedding should be reinforced with glass flock (Acra-Glas) or an atomized component introduced to the epoxy or resin.
The bedding requires extensive dams and reliable release agents. Study the action carefully for any possible complications.
Without a stockliner, the rifle must be aligned and placed correctly within the stock during bedding.
Fulton Armory will bed just about any stock correctly.
Link Posted: 9/15/2005 11:50:57 PM EDT
Reese Surplus has (or at least had) some wood BM-59 type folding stocks that had a wood pistol grip. They were quite reasonably priced. Around $120 or so. Repros, but decent. Finding an original BM-59 stock assembly fitted for an M-14 (as sold by Springfield Armory many years ago) is going to be next to impossible. Expect to pay at least $350.00. You will need to bed the action.

Springfield Armory used to sell a synthetic folding stock with pistol grip (I believe it was made by Choate Machine & Tool), but they have been out of stock for years now. The stock used to sell for about $250.00 from the factory. They come up for sale on auction sites (gunbroker.com or eBay) from time to time.

For around $250-$300, you should be able to pick up a used E-2 pistol grip stock (also wood) from Fred's. It will probably need to be bedded.

The new manufacture synthetic or alloy stocks with pistol grips (e.g., Sage Intl) are all extremely expensive, although they do offer the advantage that they do not have to be "bedded", are not affected by weather, and have integrated rails for mounting stuff.



Link Posted: 9/16/2005 5:41:53 PM EDT
Law 483 is a member here,try PMing him,he does wonderful things with M14 stocks.Law 483
Link Posted: 9/22/2005 1:35:38 PM EDT
What about the USGI synth stocks?


Originally Posted By ErzulisBoat:
The GI stock has what is called a "Stockliner" that secured via the two fasteners that are exposed on the outside of the stock. This steel insert mates with the receiver and locates the rifle. the trigger assembly then joins with the receiver.
Almost ALL aftermarket stocks do not have an allocation for this liner.
A GI M14A1 (or as civilians say M14E2) has a stockliner and has a pistolgrip. This configuration does not require any bedding. Bedding is optional.
The aftermarket stocks have a simple receptacle in the action area, and REQUIRE bedding. This should be done by a skilled individual. If you are handy, it can be done yourself. The bedding should be reinforced with glass flock (Acra-Glas) or an atomized component introduced to the epoxy or resin.
The bedding requires extensive dams and reliable release agents. Study the action carefully for any possible complications.
Without a stockliner, the rifle must be aligned and placed correctly within the stock during bedding.
Fulton Armory will bed just about any stock correctly.

Link Posted: 9/23/2005 7:22:02 AM EDT
GI synthetic pistol grip stock? Never heard of it.
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