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7/8/2020 3:01:36 PM
Posted: 12/12/2013 7:39:57 PM EDT
Regretted rushing in to something? While I admit last year I did panic buy my rcbs starter kit. I knew I wanted to learn to reload, my friend bought the kit, said it was a good starting point. Fast forward a year later I get it set up (2 moves, job promotion, job change all set me back) I'm a hands on learner (with reading of course). I've only deprimed and sized some brass today and this kit leaves so much to be desired not to mention I just ordered another 200 in other stuff now. I wish id bought a better kit. Any who just venting. I reckon I'll use this a year or 2 and upgrade. BTW where are you guys buying bullets and primers in bulk online? I've only picked up a few small things locally that I knew I could use when I got going.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 7:50:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 7:50:46 PM EDT by dryflash3]
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 7:51:03 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 12/12/2013 7:55:26 PM EDT by Danger6]
What is the problem?  If you got a Rock Chucker, you got a really good press.  If you got a balance beam scale, you really should have a digital (my opinion) to be efficient.  If you enjoy relloading you can recover.

The starter kits are like sequel movies, often a compromise or mediocre, yes also the price point / sales target thing.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 7:53:23 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 7:57:01 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By dryflash3:
The RCBS kit is like all the other "kits" in that they do not contain everything you need. Kits are put together to meet a price point, and to get you started.  

Do some reading at the top of the page, and read the front part of the reloading manual that came in your kit. You will learn a lot by reading your manual.
 
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Originally Posted By dryflash3:
Originally Posted By hondariderar:
Regretted rushing in to something? While I admit last year I did panic buy my rcbs starter kit. I knew I wanted to learn to reload, my friend bought the kit, said it was a good starting point. Fast forward a year later I get it set up (2 moves, job promotion, job change all set me back) I'm a hands on learner (with reading of course). I've only deprimed and sized some brass today and this kit leaves so much to be desired not to mention I just ordered another 200 in other stuff now. I wish id bought a better kit. Any who just venting. I reckon I'll use this a year or 2 and upgrade.
BTW where are you guys buying bullets and primers in bulk online? I've only picked up a few small things locally that I knew I could use when I got going. Look for venders in Links, and check the "Where to find" tacked thread every day. Asking where to find components in a thread will get your thread locked.
The RCBS kit is like all the other "kits" in that they do not contain everything you need. Kits are put together to meet a price point, and to get you started.  

Do some reading at the top of the page, and read the front part of the reloading manual that came in your kit. You will learn a lot by reading your manual.
 


10-4 sorry didn't think about that, spent most my afternoon at the top here reading through FAQs and tutorials and such. I see it now though
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 8:04:51 PM EDT
i have like 10k in reloading equipment. the Rock chucker is still the best press for full length resize and deprime, and it's what i use, especially with a SB die on machine-gun brass.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 8:21:38 PM EDT
Don't sweat it. I load in waves.

Brass prep is the least fun. Try just doing 50 or 100 and load em up before tackling all of your brass at once.

I use a Rock Chucker exclusively. Loaded 1200 .223 once over the course of an afternoon and the following morning. (Ball powder)
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 8:58:59 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 9:03:17 PM EDT
So is it pretty common for avid reloaders to have more then one press? You'll have to excuse some of the newness...while I've been around guns all my life, I've had to venture out on my own past the 870 and 3006 and grabbing a box of shells from Walmart for the hunt the next day.
Link Posted: 12/12/2013 11:30:04 PM EDT
Yes, most in this thread probably have a Rockchucker and a progressive on the bench, me a Dillon 550 and a Forster Coax, 3 of the best presses available.  You got a good basic kit, Rockchucker is excellent for beginning and advanced work.  The RCBS Range Master digital scale is excellent for the money, or can go cheaper too and do ok.

Reloading takes a time commitment, and learning the procedures and safety.  Use the information thread at the top to learn more about what you might want.  Rome not built in a day, you can reload decent ammo and upgrade things gradually.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 12:50:25 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By hondariderar:
So is it pretty common for avid reloaders to have more then one press? You'll have to excuse some of the newness...while I've been around guns all my life, I've had to venture out on my own past the 870 and 3006 and grabbing a box of shells from Walmart for the hunt the next day.
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Yes, many have more then one press and probably the most common is a single stage. You'll find yourself going back to it time and time again. It's great for decapping prior to your first cleaning and one off operations in the middle of a progressive run and so on. I prefer using a single stage for bottle neck rifles. I've never had the need or desire to go beyond a single stage and turret press combination for rifles and pistols. I've a couple singles and lees handheld along with turrets.

As for your original posting, all kits have pluses and minuses and they all need to be expanded on or certain items switched out. They all do give you things you will use at some point. The thing is, some manufactures products work better than others. We all adjust our equipment to better suit our individual styles as time changes it with experience or something new comes along. As you progress further into it, you'll see what I mean but a single stage is great to always have setup.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 12:51:26 AM EDT
I have a single stage Pacific press from the eighties, and a Hornady Lock n Load progressive from 1999. I'm so Speedy Gonzales but having 2 presses makes setup and caliber changes a lot easier.

The single stage is great for a 100 rounds of 308 or just a few from a short day at the range.

The progressive handles 300 or 400 from a day blasting my Glocks or M16 with some friends.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 5:12:09 AM EDT
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 9:20:16 AM EDT
I have the RC kit. I have bought a micrometer, hand priming tool, and case tumbler to add to that. That is all I have. I load 223,30-06,30-30, 45 ACP, 380, and 38/357 with no problems.

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Link Posted: 12/13/2013 9:59:22 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By mevertsen:
I have the RC kit. I have bought a micrometer, hand priming tool, and case tumbler to add to that. That is all I have. I load 223,30-06,30-30, 45 ACP, 380, and 38/357 with no problems.

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It has been a while, but I am pretty sure my Rockchucker kit came with the RCBS hand priming tool.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 10:01:17 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By AeroE:


It's common, but I think you missed the point.  None of the kits contain everything needed to reload, they are just a start, and really they should probably be modified.  Instead of including a lube pad and a bottle of lube (low cost items to fill the box), a good caliper would be a better choice.  I don't care for the RCBS trickler and I sell or give away every one I get in a trade.  They work okay, but they need some weight added.  A "deluxe" kit probably should include a drop in case gage.  LEE sells kits that include dies, and that is a good idea.

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Originally Posted By AeroE:
Originally Posted By hondariderar:
So is it pretty common for avid reloaders to have more then one press? You'll have to excuse some of the newness...while I've been around guns all my life, I've had to venture out on my own past the 870 and 3006 and grabbing a box of shells from Walmart for the hunt the next day.


It's common, but I think you missed the point.  None of the kits contain everything needed to reload, they are just a start, and really they should probably be modified.  Instead of including a lube pad and a bottle of lube (low cost items to fill the box), a good caliper would be a better choice.  I don't care for the RCBS trickler and I sell or give away every one I get in a trade.  They work okay, but they need some weight added.  A "deluxe" kit probably should include a drop in case gage.  LEE sells kits that include dies, and that is a good idea.


  I still use the lube pad and lube.  
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 5:26:40 PM EDT
I see now. I think I'm kind of just bummed. Which its definitely a learning experience. Just wish I had someone that loads already to see what's there and just ordered it all separately. Didn't realize what I want to change and better stuff til I got all mine laid out. Spent another 200 last night ordering most of my finishing touches to get me running.

I do have another question..does it hurt to prime brass and let it sit without loading it?
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 6:58:52 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By hondariderar:
I see now. I think I'm kind of just bummed. Which its definitely a learning experience. Just wish I had someone that loads already to see what's there and just ordered it all separately. Didn't realize what I want to change and better stuff til I got all mine laid out. Spent another 200 last night ordering most of my finishing touches to get me running.

I do have another question..does it hurt to prime brass and let it sit without loading it?
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I prime brass in batches, it may sit for weeks before it gets loaded. I just keep the primed brass in ziplock bags until I am ready to load it. A sealed plastic container will work just as well. You primers are in plastic trays in cardboard sleeves until you load them. Just make sure they are not stored in a damp environment and you will be fine.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 7:09:40 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 7:21:30 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By hondariderar:
So is it pretty common for avid reloaders to have more then one press? You'll have to excuse some of the newness...while I've been around guns all my life, I've had to venture out on my own past the 870 and 3006 and grabbing a box of shells from Walmart for the hunt the next day.
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I've got five

Two turrets, a rock chucker for precision work, a an old C-tyoe I use for pistol stuff, and another RCBS I keep at work for sizing cases during down time.

A Dillon is on my wish list....
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 2:44:21 PM EDT
Link Posted: 12/15/2013 12:54:07 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By hondariderar:
I see now. I think I'm kind of just bummed. Which its definitely a learning experience. Just wish I had someone that loads already to see what's there and just ordered it all separately. Didn't realize what I want to change and better stuff til I got all mine laid out. Spent another 200 last night ordering most of my finishing touches to get me running.

I do have another question..does it hurt to prime brass and let it sit without loading it?
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Nothing to be bummed out about. We've all been there on the learning curve and it's defiantly an investment. More so today then when I and many others have started out. And I wont say it's entirely on the state of the economy but also on the diversity of choices you have on the equipment that's available. I started out in the 70's using an old lee handloader, hammer, scoop and beat up bore brush to reload 44's. That's alls you really needed. Heres a little insight that may help you a bit. I wrote these to help newer reloaders and those with limited space. Read the first link, then this one.

http://www.ar15.com/forums/t_6_42/408347_A_second_run_at_my_style__this_time_bottle_necks__written_mainly_for_newer_reloaders_.html

I do use other methods on occasion like wet tumbling, a balance beam as opposed to digital, long drop tubes and so on but as far as it goes, these are about 95% of the time and hopefully will give you some direction.


As for your question, it wont hurt the primers but as others stated, store them in a way thats air tight. I don't bother pre-priming as I can do it as I reload as part of the operation or just prior to as it only takes a few minutes to do many with a hand held.
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