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Posted: 9/8/2013 6:15:50 AM EDT
Was loading 9mm, berrys plated bfp.

Seated primers got dented in non-uniform ways.  Anyone have any ideas on why?

Powder seemed to jump from 4.2 to 4.5 before actually loading i threw charges for a while before loading to run some through the hopper and "settle out" the powder and get it consistent). Green dot powder.

Also, about midway through the batch at round 50 or so, one of the loaded rounds did not have a primer.  All others before and after did.


Is that something that happens? Why?
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 6:58:58 AM EDT
Quoted:
Was loading 9mm, berrys plated bfp.

Seated primers got dented in non-uniform ways.  Anyone have any ideas on why? There a few reasons this could happen. Are you loading Mil crimped brass ? Another thing to check is if the shell plate is tightened down enough to hold the brass centered and straight ?
Powder seemed to jump from 4.2 to 4.5 before actually loading i threw charges for a while before loading to run some through the hopper and "settle out" the powder and get it consistent). Green dot powder. Is the slide bar on the hopper making a full stroke when you work the lever ? Once you get to where your not fighting the press with primers and such good even cycles of the press will settle the powder more evenly.
Also, about midway through the batch at round 50 or so, one of the loaded rounds did not have a primer.  All others before and after did. This happens to the best of us . I always look when the primer slide comes out from the primer tube to see if a primer in there and look to see if its gone when I turn the shell plate after priming.
Is that something that happens? Why?
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Link Posted: 9/8/2013 7:02:58 AM EDT
Spill any powder?   Sometimes that'll walk all the way around and deposit in the primer cup and dent your primers.  With no case on the station, simply push the handle as seating a primer and look at/wipe off the primer seater.  Spilled powder can also land on the primer shuttle and interfere with it's movement.  Make sure your primer cup doesn't rub on any of the shellplate holes.  A slight rub on the shellplate can flip a primer when it momentarily catches and releases.  BTDT.  Check all the holes in the plate as they'll occasionally make one with a hole out of alignment.  BTDT too.


The powder settling down is normal for most, especially flakes.  A lot of times I'll throw a half dozen just dumping them back in the measure doing nothing with them.  Then I'll measure one to check to see if it's on where I want to be.  Then I'll throw ten and dump them all in the same pan and see if the charge is the same with the decimal moved one place obviously.  Then I'll check a few more singles and make sure I'm not getting a randomness.  Then i load a few checking charges on each, be very careful to put the charge back in the empty case and not double charge anything.  I be super duper deliberate carefull when you're interrupting the work flow.  Know what the correct charge looks like and know what a double looks like.  I look in every case after it's filled by hovering over that station.  

my technique once stations are all full is to set the bullet on station 3, put a case in station one, cycle handle sizing, watching the primer shuttle and seeing a primer in the cup, watching the powder bar activate, lower handle, while peeking in on the powder fill at station 2 and seating the primer.  cycle the shellplate.  The most important thing is watch the powder bar and check the dropped charge by eye.  if there is ever any stoppage for any reason that affects the powder bar movement, i'd weigh it to be sure.  For the dillon I like to load with powder that can't be double charged without overfilling or at least be right up near the top.  Make it obvious.  I'd rather clean the press than get eye surgery.
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 7:50:40 AM EDT
Link Posted: 9/8/2013 10:17:30 AM EDT
Compressed air is you new best friend!  Keep source handy for keeping your machine clean.  Every 1000 rds or so clean under the primer slide.
Link Posted: 9/9/2013 2:08:48 AM EDT
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Quoted:
Also, about midway through the batch at round 50 or so, one of the loaded rounds did not have a primer. You forgot to press handle forward to prime. Simple new operator error. After loading awhile on a Dillon, it will be second nature. You just need to build the muscle memory.
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Yes, very true!!!
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