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Posted: 1/25/2014 3:03:31 PM EDT
would you? manager said its the last one and he will take $150 off. I am just thinking about all the retards and kids hanging off of it and slamming the doors.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 3:23:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By 1911xdm:
would you? manager said its the last one and he will take $150 off. I am just thinking about all the retards and kids hanging off of it and slamming the doors.
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I bought my Heritage safe as a floor model back in 2002... I've had NO problems with it at all!    
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 3:29:03 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By skidman:


I bought my Heritage safe as a floor model back in 2002... I've had NO problems with it at all!    
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Originally Posted By skidman:
Originally Posted By 1911xdm:
would you? manager said its the last one and he will take $150 off. I am just thinking about all the retards and kids hanging off of it and slamming the doors.


I bought my Heritage safe as a floor model back in 2002... I've had NO problems with it at all!    

This will be a liberty
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 3:58:59 PM EDT
Just got my new Liberty today. I dont see what could be bad unless the paint or interior is beat up. Mine is Lincoln 35 and handle, etc feel WELL built.
Link Posted: 1/25/2014 5:48:19 PM EDT
I haven't run the number recently, but the last time I did, approximately 20% of the warranty work I did for manufacturers was for floor model safes.  I would look it over well before paying for it, but you're right, they can be subject to a lot of abuse.

Link Posted: 1/26/2014 4:21:18 AM EDT
For me, I would not buy a floor model that was an electronic safe, especially if it was in a high traffic store.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 5:41:53 AM EDT
Its a dial
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 6:07:35 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 1/26/2014 6:07:42 AM EDT by telc]
Look for marks on the safe body where people may have tried to close the door with bolts extended.

 
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 8:00:08 AM EDT
It's just a hunk of steel.  If kids hanging off it could hurt it, it's not much of a safe.

Check to be sure the jamb isn't dinged by bolts not being retracted.  If the jamb isn't messed up, you're good to go.
Link Posted: 1/26/2014 8:54:45 AM EDT
 It's just a hunk of steel. If kids hanging off it could hurt it, it's not much of a safe.  
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Since we're talking about gun safes, they're just light weight sheet metal, and they aren't much of a safe  

Others have brought up chipped paint, indicating that the door was closed with the bolts extended.  This can bend those bolts if the door was slammed (most light weight gun safes lack boltwork substantial enough to prevent this).  Slamming the door can also cause the back of the lock to loosen or begin to break, which can fire the relock.  People like to jerk on the handle while the safe is locked.  I have never understood why they think that tuning the handle harder will open it, but I see it all the time.  This can damage whatever that particular manufacturer uses to prevent excessive handle force.  This can also loosen the entire assembly (keep in mind we're talking light weight sheet steel) so that there is excessive play.

Wiring ripped out of electronic locks is typical.  Mechanical locks are a bit more difficult to damage, but not impossible.  People spinning the dial hard and fast can damage the internal components of a lock.

Let's not forget that safes are designed to keep people out.  They are supposed to break when excessive force is applied.  The safe doesn't know if it's a burglar, or a customer at a safe shop doing the abuse.  Slamming doors, dropping the safe, smacking the dial, forcing handles, etc., are all things that can and will cause the safe to not let you back in.
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