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Posted: 5/28/2012 3:02:42 PM EDT
Just wondering what the general consensus is for the best hand priming style tool. I have a Lee reloader and seating dies if that makes a difference. Thanks!
Link Posted: 5/28/2012 3:34:17 PM EDT
lee. by far is the best...and i pond out alot of shells.
Link Posted: 5/28/2012 3:56:31 PM EDT
+1 for Lee.  Used the older style for about 30 years.  Parts would wear so I would just buy another one as the were not that expensive.  Just a couple of months ago bought the new Lee tool. Has taken a little while to get used to it. First the lever is used with your fingers (I used the my thumb on the old style) and the primers go along the side of the tray so I have to tip it a  differnt manner than the old style.  Big plus on the new one is now I can put an entire sleev of primers in the tray with no problems.  That old round style was a pain. Over all it is very easy to use.
Link Posted: 5/28/2012 4:22:26 PM EDT
I just purchased the Lee Ergo and I love it. Really easy to use and Ergo and as you're going to get.
Link Posted: 5/28/2012 4:26:24 PM EDT
Define "best".  Best in what way(s)?
Link Posted: 5/28/2012 4:37:16 PM EDT
I had an old Lee that broke and I went and got the new version.
I don't feel it being easier or more ergonomic, but I like the Lee's simple
design and ease of use.
Link Posted: 5/28/2012 4:37:45 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/28/2012 5:52:17 PM EDT by MonkTx]
I have used my Hornady hand primer more than any other priming tool I have.  It has excellent "feel" for seating to the bottom of the primer pocket and has not had any problems at all.

Link Posted: 5/28/2012 8:54:12 PM EDT
if you have some room to spare on the bench i would recommend the rcbs bench mounted set up.
Link Posted: 5/28/2012 9:14:29 PM EDT
Another Lee fanboy here. I havent used anything but the Lee and it works so well i dont intend to.
Link Posted: 5/28/2012 9:52:25 PM EDT
I had allot of issues with mine. primers kept going in the " no primer....... area". spilling primer got frustrating. lid comes off easy. having to get "special shell holders " no return sting just manul. kinda cheap design. after all, lee is known for poor primer system. I use a rcbs the new model with unversa shell holder spring.
                  if your interestead in a quality DON'T BUY A LEE! IMO
Link Posted: 5/29/2012 2:50:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By usmcscout:
I had allot of issues with mine. primers kept going in the " no primer....... area". spilling primer got frustrating. lid comes off easy. having to get "special shell holders " no return sting just manul. kinda cheap design. after all, lee is known for poor primer system. I use a rcbs the new model with unversa shell holder spring.
                  if your interestead in a quality DON'T BUY A LEE! IMO


Sir, since we agree that Lee isn't the "best", and contrary to the majority that has posted thus far perhaps a alternative is needed.  IMHO, Sinclair Int. sells the best hand primer on the market but since most here tend toward the cheaper route probably not worth considering due to the expense.  Just my humble opinion.  HTH, 7zero1.

Link Posted: 5/29/2012 4:07:29 AM EDT
I prefer the RCBS one.  It uses standard case holders and is easy to operate.

I loved my friends old lee one, so much that I bought a new lee.  That was a disappointment.  

The new lee is nowhere as easy to use as the old lee and I keep having primers flip out of the little step.

Not to mention having to buy the special case inserts for the lee primer just so I can use it.
Link Posted: 5/29/2012 5:06:01 AM EDT


I'm probably no help, since it's an expensive setup...but I'm using the RCBS APS Hand Primer.




I can load up the APS strips in about 120 seconds.

The APS Hand Primer uses a universal chuck, so I don't need any shellplates.

It's got a good feel so you can tell when you hit bottom, or when you need to re-address a crimp that wasn't fully removed.






Link Posted: 5/29/2012 10:01:13 PM EDT
Lee.

Plus they are cheap enough (at least the old ones were) that I just bought two and left one permanently set up for large primers and the other for small.
Link Posted: 5/29/2012 10:42:57 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/29/2012 10:50:18 PM EDT by GWhis]
Originally Posted By 7zero1:
Originally Posted By usmcscout:
I had allot of issues with mine. primers kept going in the " no primer....... area". spilling primer got frustrating. lid comes off easy. having to get "special shell holders " no return sting just manul. kinda cheap design. after all, lee is known for poor primer system. I use a rcbs the new model with unversa shell holder spring.
                  if your interestead in a quality DON'T BUY A LEE! IMO


Sir, since we agree that Lee isn't the "best", and contrary to the majority that has posted thus far perhaps a alternative is needed.  IMHO, Sinclair Int. sells the best hand primer on the market but since most here tend toward the cheaper route probably not worth considering due to the expense.  Just my humble opinion.  HTH, 7zero1.



Have to agree with you if you are loading a dozen or so at the range for benchrest.  But IMO it is not practical for people who are trying to remove reloading bottlenecks.  Handling a primer one at a time doesn't cut it for most of us.  I've never used one, but did replace my dangerous press-mounted tube loader with a similar one at a time hand Lee hand tool eons ago....which I gladly replace with Lee's first tray-fed unit....vowing to never do them one at a time ever again.

More recently I just as gladly replaced the Lee unit with RCBS's universal shell holder equipped, APS hand primer tool (also offered as a tray-fed tool).  It is so good, that Lee responded with their tray-fed Ergo unit that copied RCBS's super comfortable body, and finally did away with their thumb ruining design.

The guys at AccurateShooter.Com agree with me....They review the RCBS tool At 6mmbr.com(price is a bit higher these days....along with everything else.)
Link Posted: 5/30/2012 2:39:50 AM EDT
Originally Posted By GWhis:
Originally Posted By 7zero1:
Originally Posted By usmcscout:
I had allot of issues with mine. primers kept going in the " no primer....... area". spilling primer got frustrating. lid comes off easy. having to get "special shell holders " no return sting just manul. kinda cheap design. after all, lee is known for poor primer system. I use a rcbs the new model with unversa shell holder spring.
                  if your interestead in a quality DON'T BUY A LEE! IMO


Sir, since we agree that Lee isn't the "best", and contrary to the majority that has posted thus far perhaps a alternative is needed.  IMHO, Sinclair Int. sells the best hand primer on the market but since most here tend toward the cheaper route probably not worth considering due to the expense.  Just my humble opinion.  HTH, 7zero1.



Have to agree with you if you are loading a dozen or so at the range for benchrest.  But IMO it is not practical for people who are trying to remove reloading bottlenecks.  Handling a primer one at a time doesn't cut it for most of us.  I've never used one, but did replace my dangerous press-mounted tube loader with a similar one at a time hand Lee hand tool eons ago....which I gladly replace with Lee's first tray-fed unit....vowing to never do them one at a time ever again.

More recently I just as gladly replaced the Lee unit with RCBS's universal shell holder equipped, APS hand primer tool (also offered as a tray-fed tool).  It is so good, that Lee responded with their tray-fed Ergo unit that copied RCBS's super comfortable body, and finally did away with their thumb ruining design.

The guys at AccurateShooter.Com agree with me....They review the RCBS tool At 6mmbr.com(price is a bit higher these days....along with everything else.)


Sir, since I'm not into bench rest shooting and don't load only a few cartridges at the range I wouldn't know from that perspective.  However as an active highpower rifle competitor I do normally reload about 1000 rounds at a time.  I've learned that consistancy with each and every cartridge in every step of the reloading process provides the results I'm looking for.  Primer seating is one of those steps and I usually do it with reloading trays of 100 cases each while otherwise doing nothing in particular, ie:  watching TV.  

I've used other primer seating methods including the progressive stages of my Dillon 550 and 650 in addition to the original tube fed mechanism on my RCBS Rockchucker.  I've also tried a few of the hand primers, Lee included and I've broken a few.  Nothing compares to the tactile sensation achieved with the Sinclair tool, I can tell from the sensation when the primer is properly seated and that's the important part to ensure as consistant ignition as I possibly can given the manufacturing variables from the factory.  JMHO, 7zero1.

Link Posted: 5/30/2012 5:10:47 AM EDT
I've been using a Lee for many years, and it does the job very well, even with once-fired military cases on which I really should have removed the primer pocket crimp but didn't.
Link Posted: 5/30/2012 8:25:05 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/1/2012 3:35:35 PM EDT by GWhis]
Originally Posted By 7zero1:

Sir, since I'm not into bench rest shooting and don't load only a few cartridges at the range I wouldn't know from that perspective.  However as an active highpower rifle competitor I do normally reload about 1000 rounds at a time.  I've learned that consistancy with each and every cartridge in every step of the reloading process provides the results I'm looking for.  Primer seating is one of those steps and I usually do it with reloading trays of 100 cases each while otherwise doing nothing in particular, ie:  watching TV.  

I've used other primer seating methods including the progressive stages of my Dillon 550 and 650 in addition to the original tube fed mechanism on my RCBS Rockchucker.  I've also tried a few of the hand primers, Lee included and I've broken a few.  Nothing compares to the tactile sensation achieved with the Sinclair tool, I can tell from the sensation when the primer is properly seated and that's the important part to ensure as consistant ignition as I possibly can given the manufacturing variables from the factory.  JMHO, 7zero1.


The Sinclair (first picture) is a well built tool to be sure, with great feel as you say, but since you have to feed it one at a time, it's slow and tedious (best done with a distraction like TV as you said), with its square handle, it's not comfortable to use for long periods, it doesn't come with shellholder, and at $120 plus another $16 for a Lee Autoprime shell holder set ($136), it's hands down the most expensive hand tool.  No other hand tool can touch it for a classy status symbol, though.

The Lee Autoprime (last picture) is designed as a thumb operated tool, which isn't nice to my old thumb during a long session, but it's the cheapest my far at $18.50 + $16 (shell holder kit)..that's $34.50.  It won't last as long as the Sinclair, but you can prime tons faster, with excellent feel, and buy several years worth of replacement parts and still never approach the cost of the Sinclair.

Lee's Ergo Tool (the picture of the bright red tool) is way better designed for long sessions, with similar feel except you can rest your thumb since it's a finger pull tool.  You can get it for $26 + $16 ($42)

The second and third pictures are the RCBS Universals, tray-fed, and APS strip fed.  They are the original "Ergo" design, well built, no shell holders to buy or fiddle with.  Comfortable with great feel seating primers.  Tray fed is $52 with no shell holders to buy or fiddle with.  

The APS version is pricier at $62 for the tool and a few strips, but then unless you already have one, add $36 for a strip loader .  Total $96. Packages of extra strips can be purchased also if you need more.  The APS is best for people like me who bought the RCBS Pro 2000. (strips, strip loader comes with that...and you are already buying primers already loaded in strips ($6 more per 1000).  Worth it for me, for the convenience and speed.  But even when loading special stuff on my single station press, I still like the APS tool best....I gave away my perfectly servicable Lee Autoprime.
Link Posted: 5/30/2012 10:03:54 AM EDT
I like my cheap but solid Lee
Link Posted: 5/30/2012 10:59:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 5/30/2012 11:02:39 AM EDT by glorifiedG]
I use the Sinclair tool, I like it, it's actually pretty quick once you get the hang of it. I can see how some of those others are appealing though
Link Posted: 5/30/2012 2:26:21 PM EDT
I have and use two of the RCBS regular hand primers (requires a shell holder)

I keep one for L and one for S the large for 308, 7MM and 8MM and the small for 223.
I have had a couple Lee hand tools but actually they are more expensive than the RCBS

You may disagree but when one considers after buying the RCBS he is done paying for it. It has a life time guarantee and if you wear it out completely they will replace it free.
Lee has a two year warranty and I have broke the handle on both I owned being they are cheap pot metal and designed in a manner that has to fail.
If you send it back to them they will replace it and charge you 50% of the current list price which is almost what buying one at Midway cost.
therefore, if you load a lot the RCBS is much cheaper and certainly better (IMO).
The Lee was not a bad one (the older version) just made to fail and the company does not stand behind them like RCBS

I use a D-SQDB for my only pistol caliber 45ACP

While I load match 308 and 223 as well as other rifle calibers single stage all my 55/62gr 223 loads are on a D-550B but I size on a Forster Bonanza and prime by hand (lacquer thinner wash after sizing to remove lube) and I also do not care for the Dillon to prime with so use the RCBS.

Not against the Lee just feel in the long run I would prefer to have a better priming tool for what amounts to less money


Wulfmann
Link Posted: 5/30/2012 4:07:01 PM EDT
I have two older RCBS hand held (one for small base shells and the other for larger base).  The fxxking things refuse to break - have had them for years and have in various settings primed so many shells that my hand hurt (blisters and all that).  Probably better ones out there but for the money (at the time), both were excellent purchases.
Link Posted: 5/30/2012 5:29:41 PM EDT
I asked the OP to define what he means by "best".  It was his only criteria in his question, yet he failed to define it for us.  To date, he has not replied.
Link Posted: 5/30/2012 6:43:03 PM EDT
I have an old LEE handheld version and I absolutley love it. I have a RCBS handheld version and I don't like it so much.
the lee is so cheap you can risk not liking it and beside you can easily sell it if you don't like it.
Link Posted: 5/31/2012 11:36:28 PM EDT
Originally Posted By GWhis:
 It is so good, that Lee responded with their tray-fed Ergo unit that copied RCBS's super comfortable body, and finally did away with their thumb ruining design.


It never occurred to me to use my thumb on the Lee lever.  I use the meaty part of my palm below the thumb.
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