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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 11/13/2001 7:01:45 PM EDT
I'm new to the AR and recently heard that keeping my rifle on safe with one in the pipe all the time could damage the trigger due to the spring being compressed all the time. I guess it's the same theory as keeping a magazine fully loaded all the time. Anyone know if this is really something to worry about or not? How do you (short term) store your AR? Thanx in advance.

---Chris
Link Posted: 11/13/2001 7:22:26 PM EDT
Link Posted: 11/13/2001 7:25:17 PM EDT
Do you kow where I can find the info on how to do that? Like I said, I'm a newbie. :) Thanx for the reply.

---Chris
Link Posted: 11/13/2001 7:30:20 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 11/13/2001 7:23:24 PM EDT by Troy]
Link Posted: 11/14/2001 5:29:48 PM EDT

Originally Posted By aGlockworkOrange:
I'm new to the AR and recently heard that keeping my rifle on safe with one in the pipe all the time could damage the trigger due to the spring being compressed all the time. I guess it's the same theory as keeping a magazine fully loaded all the time. Anyone know if this is really something to worry about or not? How do you (short term) store your AR? Thanx in advance.

---Chris



The AR15 has a free floating fire pin. It's not recommended that you keep it "cocked and locked" as dropping the rifle, or any other type of impact could caues a discharge, even if it is on safe.

Hammer down, magazine inserted is the safest way to go. Just pull and let go the charging handle and you're ready to go.
Link Posted: 11/14/2001 5:54:08 PM EDT

Originally Posted By back40:

Originally Posted By aGlockworkOrange:
I'm new to the AR and recently heard that keeping my rifle on safe with one in the pipe all the time could damage the trigger due to the spring being compressed all the time. I guess it's the same theory as keeping a magazine fully loaded all the time. Anyone know if this is really something to worry about or not? How do you (short term) store your AR? Thanx in advance.

---Chris



The AR15 has a free floating fire pin. It's not recommended that you keep it "cocked and locked" as dropping the rifle, or any other type of impact could caues a discharge, even if it is on safe.

Hammer down, magazine inserted is the safest way to go. Just pull and let go the charging handle and you're ready to go.



Could not agree with you more! Try this experiment:

Lock the bolt back and return the charging handle. Then, hold the rifle by the barrel or front sight post and gently tap the butt on a hard ground surface. Try doing it a little harder each time until the bolt flys forward. (it does NOT take much) This should give you a "feel" for the phenomena back40 is talking about.

Just leave a loaded mag in the well, it takes a fraction of a second to charge the bolt and fire.
Link Posted: 11/15/2001 2:06:32 PM EDT

Originally Posted By FMJunkie:
Lock the bolt back and return the charging handle. Then, hold the rifle by the barrel or front sight post and gently tap the butt on a hard ground surface. Try doing it a little harder each time until the bolt flys forward. (it does NOT take much) This should give you a "feel" for the phenomena back40 is talking about.



Except that there's a *HUGE* difference between getting the bolt carrier to fall and getting the firing pin to fall.
Link Posted: 11/15/2001 3:13:46 PM EDT
This rifle, like all other quality firearms was designed to be carried chamber loaded, cocked, and locked. Just as the magazine spring can remain compressed for years without harm, there's no harm in keeping the hammer cocked as well. Since the part is a whopping 95 cents you can change 'em monthly if you want for less than 12 bucks .

A firearm intended for instant use should be kept in firing condition, not something less.

-- Chuck
Link Posted: 11/15/2001 4:20:28 PM EDT
Have to go with Chuck on this one. Springs wear by the number of cycles on them, not the length of time left compressed.

Back to the original question, the trigger spring hardly moves when the hammer is cocked. The hammer spring is the one that's loaded. Those two loops around the hammer pin reduce the stress on the spring so much it can be left cocked forever. Hard to imagine one actually wearing out, but I haven't got bazillions of rounds on one AR.

I did wear out a similar spring on something else, but it was from rubbing on the pivot, not from bending stresses. The bugger wore right through after only ten years. Imagine! Cost me a whole $1.
Link Posted: 11/15/2001 6:24:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Hoplophile:

Originally Posted By FMJunkie:
Lock the bolt back and return the charging handle. Then, hold the rifle by the barrel or front sight post and gently tap the butt on a hard ground surface. Try doing it a little harder each time until the bolt flys forward. (it does NOT take much) This should give you a "feel" for the phenomena back40 is talking about.



Except that there's a *HUGE* difference between getting the bolt carrier to fall and getting the firing pin to fall.



I think he was trying to give him just an idea how shit can happen.
GG
Link Posted: 11/16/2001 11:53:33 AM EDT
I accidently left my preban Bushmaster shorty cocked for about eight months. Called Bushmaster and asked them if I should think about replacing any springs because of this and they said forget about it, the springs would have gotten more wear if I had been shooting the gun every week.
Link Posted: 11/17/2001 3:07:00 PM EDT
I leave mine with a fully loaded 30rd mag in the well, the bolt back, and the safety on. That way all I have to do is pick it up, hit the bolt release, flip the safety, and pull the tigger(after aiming obviously). Having to pull the bolt back and releasing it would waste time, since they you would have to change where you are holding the rifle.
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