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Posted: 10/2/2014 8:02:41 AM EST
... is there any merit in, or negative consequences of, conditioning a new suppressor (internals) with Break-free prior to initial use?
Is there another or better hi-temp liquid solution? Or is this a waste of time and resources?

Link Posted: 10/2/2014 8:18:48 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 8:19:10 AM EST by sanman28]
Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf:
... is there any merit in, or negative consequences of, conditioning a new suppressor (internals) with Break-free prior to initial use?
Is there another or better hi-temp liquid solution? Or is this a waste of time and resources?





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There is nothing to condition. You just shoot boolits through it.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 8:25:20 AM EST
I guess I'm confused as to what you're trying to "condition".

I've never heard of this.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 8:35:14 AM EST
I put a couple of drops of BF into my .22 cans before shooting.


When I'm done I turn the can on it's end and let it sit for a day or two. Turn it upside down and tap it on a rubber pad, and a good amount of unburned powder will fall out into a nice, neat pile.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 8:52:30 AM EST
Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf:
... is there any merit in, or negative consequences of, conditioning a new suppressor (internals) with Break-free prior to initial use?
Is there another or better hi-temp liquid solution? Or is this a waste of time and resources?
View Quote

They are meant to run dry. If you put break free in, it will vaporize and go OUT. Will make the can a bit quieter initially on pistol and rimfire cans and then it will smoke to high heaven .

On a RIFLE can, you could blow the thing up. If there is an excess of left over break free in the can, it acts as a coolant. Basically, you're shooting the can 'wet' and rifle cans aren't designed for that.

JUST SHOOT IT!
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 8:55:16 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 8:56:17 AM EST by Winston_Wolf]
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Originally Posted By fook:
I put a couple of drops of BF into my .22 cans before shooting.

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... similar to my thinking as well.
First, submerse entire suppressor in Pyrex tube filled with Break-Free overnight, thoroughly drain.
Then just add a couple drops prior to shooting

Hypothesis being, may be easier to clean and maintain in the future


Link Posted: 10/2/2014 8:58:40 AM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 8:59:24 AM EST by RDTCU]
Is this a .22 can, a pistol can or a rifle can?

Only advantage might be to keep a rimfire can from leading up as quickly.
Make sure it won't eat your coating off.

Rifle cans are basically self-cleaning with full power ammo.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 8:58:51 AM EST
In general, nothing needs to be done. You can put some grease/oil/water in some types of suppressors as an artificial environment to help quiet things down but there is no "conditioning" necessary.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 9:03:40 AM EST
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Originally Posted By BadgerArms:

They are meant to run dry. If you put break free in, it will vaporize and go OUT. Will make the can a bit quieter initially on pistol and rimfire cans and then it will smoke to high heaven .

On a RIFLE can, you could blow the thing up. If there is an excess of left over break free in the can, it acts as a coolant. Basically, you're shooting the can 'wet' and rifle cans aren't designed for that.

JUST SHOOT IT!
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Originally Posted By BadgerArms:
Originally Posted By Winston_Wolf:
... is there any merit in, or negative consequences of, conditioning a new suppressor (internals) with Break-free prior to initial use?
Is there another or better hi-temp liquid solution? Or is this a waste of time and resources?

They are meant to run dry. If you put break free in, it will vaporize and go OUT. Will make the can a bit quieter initially on pistol and rimfire cans and then it will smoke to high heaven .

On a RIFLE can, you could blow the thing up. If there is an excess of left over break free in the can, it acts as a coolant. Basically, you're shooting the can 'wet' and rifle cans aren't designed for that.

JUST SHOOT IT!

I'm not saying you're wrong but the instructions to my Surefire Mini states you can shoot it wet. The warranty would cover it if something bad happened.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 9:19:09 AM EST
Que? Conditioning?
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 10:35:05 AM EST
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Originally Posted By AKSU:
I'm not saying you're wrong but the instructions to my Surefire Mini states you can shoot it wet. The warranty would cover it if something bad happened.
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I'm not saying YOU are wrong, but can you provide a link? Does this apply to the full-sized cans as well? And are you saying that they recommend using conventional coolants to improve performance or just that if you get the can wet, you don't have to dry it before you shoot it?
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 12:03:01 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BadgerArms:

I'm not saying YOU are wrong, but can you provide a link? Does this apply to the full-sized cans as well? And are you saying that they recommend using conventional coolants to improve performance or just that if you get the can wet, you don't have to dry it before you shoot it?
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Originally Posted By BadgerArms:
Originally Posted By AKSU:
I'm not saying you're wrong but the instructions to my Surefire Mini states you can shoot it wet. The warranty would cover it if something bad happened.

I'm not saying YOU are wrong, but can you provide a link? Does this apply to the full-sized cans as well? And are you saying that they recommend using conventional coolants to improve performance or just that if you get the can wet, you don't have to dry it before you shoot it?


just a couple cc's, and shake out the eccess, my spr m4 and socom both say you can add water, and surefire says you can also use saliva, which i dont feel is necesary, but i could.

the only thing i could see going wrong is adding too much water and it running back, filling the barrel. its not goimg to blow up the can
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 2:37:32 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/2/2014 2:41:50 PM EST by AKSU]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By BadgerArms:

I'm not saying YOU are wrong, but can you provide a link? Does this apply to the full-sized cans as well? And are you saying that they recommend using conventional coolants to improve performance or just that if you get the can wet, you don't have to dry it before you shoot it?
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Originally Posted By BadgerArms:
Originally Posted By AKSU:
I'm not saying you're wrong but the instructions to my Surefire Mini states you can shoot it wet. The warranty would cover it if something bad happened.

I'm not saying YOU are wrong, but can you provide a link? Does this apply to the full-sized cans as well? And are you saying that they recommend using conventional coolants to improve performance or just that if you get the can wet, you don't have to dry it before you shoot it?

I don't have a link to my user manual but here is exactly what it states-

"To eliminate first round flash, detach suppressor and add a small amount of water into the rear of the suppressor or submerge suppressor under water. Hold vertically 6-8 seconds to drain any excess water before re-attaching . Saliva or other non-flammable liquid can be used if water is not available."

Here is a video showing a Mini filled completely with water by Larry Vickers and then being shot.

http:/ /youtu.be/wviX3yemjMI
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 2:45:50 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AKSU:

I don't have a link to my user manual but here is exactly what it states-

"To eliminate first round flash, detach suppressor and add a small amount of water into the rear of the suppressor or submerge suppressor under water. Hold vertically 6-8 seconds to drain any excess water before re-attaching . Saliva or other non-flammable liquid can be used if water is not available."

Here is a video showing a Mini filled completely with water by Larry Vickers and then being shot.

http:/ /youtu.be/wviX3yemjMI
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Originally Posted By AKSU:
Originally Posted By BadgerArms:
Originally Posted By AKSU:
I'm not saying you're wrong but the instructions to my Surefire Mini states you can shoot it wet. The warranty would cover it if something bad happened.

I'm not saying YOU are wrong, but can you provide a link? Does this apply to the full-sized cans as well? And are you saying that they recommend using conventional coolants to improve performance or just that if you get the can wet, you don't have to dry it before you shoot it?

I don't have a link to my user manual but here is exactly what it states-

"To eliminate first round flash, detach suppressor and add a small amount of water into the rear of the suppressor or submerge suppressor under water. Hold vertically 6-8 seconds to drain any excess water before re-attaching . Saliva or other non-flammable liquid can be used if water is not available."

Here is a video showing a Mini filled completely with water by Larry Vickers and then being shot.

http:/ /youtu.be/wviX3yemjMI


My Socom556-Rc said the same thing. I shot it wet with water and it sounded like it made a tiny difference.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 3:03:31 PM EST
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Originally Posted By Stantonizm:


My Socom556-Rc said the same thing. I shot it wet with water and it sounded like it made a tiny difference.
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Originally Posted By Stantonizm:
Originally Posted By AKSU:
Originally Posted By BadgerArms:
Originally Posted By AKSU:
I'm not saying you're wrong but the instructions to my Surefire Mini states you can shoot it wet. The warranty would cover it if something bad happened.

I'm not saying YOU are wrong, but can you provide a link? Does this apply to the full-sized cans as well? And are you saying that they recommend using conventional coolants to improve performance or just that if you get the can wet, you don't have to dry it before you shoot it?

I don't have a link to my user manual but here is exactly what it states-

"To eliminate first round flash, detach suppressor and add a small amount of water into the rear of the suppressor or submerge suppressor under water. Hold vertically 6-8 seconds to drain any excess water before re-attaching . Saliva or other non-flammable liquid can be used if water is not available."

Here is a video showing a Mini filled completely with water by Larry Vickers and then being shot.

http:/ /youtu.be/wviX3yemjMI


My Socom556-Rc said the same thing. I shot it wet with water and it sounded like it made a tiny difference.

Running it wet won't lower the decibels noticeably like a pistol can will.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 4:17:16 PM EST
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Originally Posted By AKSU:
Here is a video showing a Mini filled completely with water by Larry Vickers and then being shot.

http://youtu.be/wviX3yemjMI
View Quote

Thanks for the info and the link. I did a little more poking around. I think the best reason for running a RIFLE can wet would be flash suppression. I still don't think it would be something I would ever do.

Watching the Vickers video, I have a different take on what I saw. He didn't 'fill' the suppressor completely with water. You see him pouring water in, but on the first shot, there is no water pouring out of any orifice. It's likely he did what I do with pistol and rimfire cans. That is, pour a few ounces in then shake it out a few times.

But, I was under the [mistaken] impression that rifle cans should not be run wet. The advantages seem small, though, so it is more academic to me tat this point.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 7:45:59 PM EST
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Originally Posted By fook:
I put a couple of drops of BF into my .22 cans before shooting.


When I'm done I turn the can on it's end and let it sit for a day or two. Turn it upside down and tap it on a rubber pad, and a good amount of unburned powder will fall out into a nice, neat pile.
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That will happen with most .22 cans, without breakfree.

OP, there is no break-in period for a silencer. Take it out of the box and shoot it.
Link Posted: 10/2/2014 11:14:56 PM EST
Be careful when adding media to a rifle can. The media can displace volume in the can, which results in increased pressure which your can may or may not handle well.

There's another thread I read about someone "conditioning" his pistol can baffles and tube which various lubricants to see if it would make them any easier to clean/more resistant to fouling. It did in some cases, but not by much.
Link Posted: 10/4/2014 6:11:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/4/2014 6:12:05 PM EST by Winston_Wolf]
... Range report

No additives. Ran it dry strait from box, the factory residue sure put on quite a smoky show for the first dozen rounds or so!
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