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Link Posted: 11/29/2010 5:02:50 AM EST
[#1]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Looks like none of those have top or bottom bolts.  But damn those side bolts seemed to fold over pretty easily.


Most cheap safes don't actually support those big bolts with anything, they're all for looks. They're bolted to thin metal brackets using 1/4" bolts and without any internal support they just easily bend out of the way.


can i beef mine up some how?
i have a welder and steel
Hydra
Link Posted: 11/29/2010 5:12:57 AM EST
[#2]
Man....I do not think I will sleep well tonight.  
Link Posted: 11/29/2010 5:30:29 AM EST
[#3]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Heres one for ya.

http://i56.tinypic.com/kbq1pe.jpg

It was not bolted down.
Theives turned it on its back and used the homeowners tools to bust the bolts loose.
Everything worth anything, gone.



You know what model of Heritage that is?


Don't see any top bolts. So would say its one of there old fortress models. 12ga body?  I've seen a 10ga body open like that on a old champion. But the top and bottom bolts stop them. When you have 5' to 6' of thin metal, you are going to flex it back.
Link Posted: 11/29/2010 6:21:22 AM EST
[#4]
I still think hiding it if you can is one of the best options.  A false wall or something along those lines.  And not telegraphing to everyone you know that you own guns.

If they don't know it's there, they won't be specifically looking for it.  If they don't find it they can't break into it.
Link Posted: 11/29/2010 1:53:56 PM EST
[#5]


Even though the net result is the same, the Heritage did appear to put up a bit more resistance than a few of these other examples.
Link Posted: 11/29/2010 4:53:54 PM EST
[#6]
I was told by a guy that the only good ones are commercial jewelry safes, he had this massive Swedish one, I'd never seen one like it before.
Link Posted: 11/29/2010 5:12:35 PM EST
[#7]



Quoted:

I just hate seeing people blowing 2k+ on RSC's.... That's a waste of money. Spend money on a high-end combo lock for reliability and look for SIMPLE and TOUGH boltwork. The more bolts you have the more likely something is going to break or hang up, probably at a bad time. Remember it's a sheetmetal box.
Any recommendations?





 
Link Posted: 11/30/2010 6:19:10 AM EST
[#8]
how hard would it be to install a electro magnet to the four corners of the door?
have a battery backup inside the vault, in case they unplug the power leads to the thing...

those electro magnets can be very very VERY strong.
Link Posted: 11/30/2010 6:44:00 AM EST
[#9]
Quoted:
how hard would it be to install a electro magnet to the four corners of the door?
have a battery backup inside the vault, in case they unplug the power leads to the thing...

those electro magnets can be very very VERY strong.


Not a bad idea. I know the type you're talking about, on commercial doors with key-card/RFID fob access etc.

The main problem I see is that they require several square inches of surface area to get the needed pull, which means designing the safe from scratch to use them. I don't think it's something you could retrofit to around the edge of the door on an existing safe.

Honestly, the easiest thing to do are twofold.

1. Bolt the safe down.

2. Position the safe in tight confines so a pry-bar can't be pushed more than a few inches.  If you've got only a corner in an open room to work with, make sure the edge of the door that opens, opposite the hinges is against a wall.

Thieves by definition are lazy, otherwise they wouldn't be thieves.

Then all you're up against is a cutting/saw, chisel, and wedge/sledge/ax type attack, on the one exposed side, and the number of those seems to be way lower than the prybar ones on average.  IMO, exposed hinges, when backed by a full length flange, or pins aren't bad either, because they are more likely to waste time cutting/sledging them off, only to find it makes no difference. Studs, drywall etc. is just meh... I've got no problem with insurance paying to fix that. It's the guns I'm protecting and I'm emotionally invested in.

My ideal setup would be a concealed closet for the real safe, with a cheap Homak/Stack-On cabinet filled with Century Arms U-Fix-em craptastic milsurp Mosin Nagant's, and maybe one or two cheap-ass Charles Daly-type Walmart imports, an air-rifle, and some cheap electronics.. as the DOOR to the hidden closet.
Link Posted: 12/1/2010 7:57:28 PM EST
[#10]
A little cheapo honey-pot safe filled with crap in plain sight is always a good idea.

Don't forget fake costume jewelry in a wooden box too. I've got two boxes of blank checks as well with my name mispelled and bogus routing/account numbers on them. They're cheap to order from anywhere online.

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