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Posted: 12/12/2010 6:07:07 PM EDT
Always have to give an extra attention to detail when working up multiple loads in one session. 2 different types of powders and 4 different charge weights across the box. After a while it gets real easy for the brain to miss a beat and be thinking 27 grains when you should be at 25....or 23 when you should be at 27 etc....

Row 1: 27g RL15, 53g SMK, LC brass
Row 2: 27g RL15, 53g SMK, LC brass
Row 3: 27g RL15, 53g SMK, Win brass, COAL moved out a touch
Row 4: Fouler
Row 5: 24.5g RL15, 69g SMK, LC brass
Row 6: 24.5g RL15, 69g SMK, LC brass
Row 7: Fouler
Row 8: 23g Tac, 69 SMK, LC brass - Testing as a benchrest replacement for the RL15/Varget I usually use.
Row 9:Fouler (Need one grab one)
Row 10: 25g Tac, 55g Win FMJ, Win brass - Testing as a plinking load

Should be a good range trip as soon as I get my benchrest back. Loaned it to my boss so he could sight in his kids air rifle.  


Link Posted: 12/12/2010 6:10:42 PM EDT
[#1]
Personally, if I was doing something like that I would go start to finish on group A, then start to finish on group B, etc just so I don't brain fart and blow my face off.  I figure a 55,000 PSI explosion 3 inches from my face isn't something I want to screw up.  YMMV.
Link Posted: 12/12/2010 6:13:28 PM EDT
[#2]
Quoted:
Personally, if I was doing something like that I would go start to finish on group A, then start to finish on group B, etc just so I don't brain fart and blow my face off.  I figure a 55,000 PSI explosion 3 inches from my face isn't something I want to screw up.  YMMV.


Yep, thats what I did. First rows are all RL15 then moved on to Tac. Still, I stepped away more than once to give my brain a mental gap in procedure. I agree 100%, you dont want to mess up when dealing with stuff like this!
Link Posted: 12/12/2010 6:18:11 PM EDT
[#3]
The only gotcha missing in your description is a rattlesnake. You play with two powder cans open like that and in use. I promise sooner or later odds will catch up. You'll loose concentration and get bit. One of our cardinal rules is to only have one type of primer and powder on bench at one time.
Link Posted: 12/12/2010 6:25:51 PM EDT
[#4]
When I do different loads I do each one start to finish and put them in ziplock bags with the load data on a post-it note stuck to the inside of the bag. Usually when I'm looking for the OCW. 10 rounds a bag is good for me.
Link Posted: 12/12/2010 6:26:35 PM EDT
[#5]
Quoted:
The only gotcha missing in your description is a rattlesnake. You play with two powder cans open like that and in use. I promise sooner or later odds will catch up. You'll loose concentration and get bit. One of our cardinal rules is to only have one type of primer and powder on bench at one time.


I didnt really specify that. Actually only the components needed for each row were out. In other words there were 5 pieces of brass, 5 bullets and 1 can of powder. Load a row. Set out 5 bullets, 5 pieces of brass and load a row. Powder change time I cleaned the trickler, capped in and put it in the shelf. Get out the next powder, load trickler, grab 5 pieces of brass and 5 bullets.

Yeah, I'll agree having 2 cans of powder out at the same time is a recipe for a real big problem.
Link Posted: 12/12/2010 8:26:11 PM EDT
[#6]
When i do small test loads like that i put them in 20 round XM193 box's i save.
I tape my data on the side and tape the lid shut so they don't spill out.
Also do them start to finish except for the ready to load primed brass in the blocks.
My memory ain't so good and if i don't do it that way a week later i would get mixed up most likely.
When i find some loads i like i put them in my plastic box's and tape the data sheet inside the top lid.
Link Posted: 12/13/2010 4:52:51 AM EDT
[#7]
Why do you have nail clippers on the reloading bench?
In fact why do you have any of that crap on the bench? No wonder you're worried about a brain fart...
J/K..  Likes others have said, I load out a batch before walking away or taking a break.
I always try to start fresh when I get to the bench.

I screw around with alot of different bullets so setting the dies to get the COAL correct is always a bitch. I
usually load the first one too short then have to take that silly hammer bullet puller and whack it on the
vise 5 or 10 times to get the bullet out to length.
Link Posted: 12/13/2010 5:29:47 AM EDT
[#8]
I like the idea of using old ammo boxes and taping the data on the side. The bag idea isnt too bad either.

The reason my desk is so clutterd is because thats my computer desk. My kids seem to think everything in the house belongs on my desk.
Link Posted: 12/13/2010 8:18:24 AM EDT
[#9]
Quoted:
I like the idea of using old ammo boxes and taping the data on the side. The bag idea isnt too bad either.

The reason my desk is so clutterd is because thats my computer desk. My kids seem to think everything in the house belongs on my desk.


I hope your reloading bench in tidier than your computer room desk?

I'll do differing loads at a single time, but usually this will only entail powder charge weights, or bullet choice.  I'll not open two different powders and I generally only fiddle with one primer and brass type, at a time.

This being said, I always mark my brass with a Sharpie for every deviation I do, whether it's two, or five, the cases will all be marked with an A, B, C or D (see, I don't use the Oxford comma!) on the side.  At this point, I'll load up the batches and note them in my reloading journal.  This keeps things straight should I need to stop, or get distracted.

But for 338LM, my OCD only allows me to work in batches of fifty, so if it's twenty-five/twenty-five, ten/ten/ten/ten/ten, or whatever combo of fifty, for my workups and experiments.  That's how I roll.

I used to do the odd number in the beginning, with my 7 RM Sendero, four here and nine there, but it got a little too ghey for my tastes.

Chris

Link Posted: 12/13/2010 8:27:30 AM EDT
[#10]
Quoted:
I like the idea of using old ammo boxes and taping the data on the side. The bag idea isnt too bad either.

The reason my desk is so clutterd is because thats my computer desk. My kids seem to think everything in the house belongs on my desk.


I use old ammo boxes a lot.  they have th eplastic inserts in there, so if I have a bunch of different ammo in there I can use masking tape and stick to the plastic insert to mark which rounds are which.  Or, if they are all the same I use masking tape on the outside of the box.  Works well.
Link Posted: 12/13/2010 9:15:29 AM EDT
[#11]
Quoted:
When I do different loads I do each one start to finish and put them in ziplock bags with the load data on a post-it note stuck to the inside of the bag. Usually when I'm looking for the OCW. 10 rounds a bag is good for me.


Same here
Link Posted: 12/13/2010 3:37:12 PM EDT
[#12]
double tap
Link Posted: 12/13/2010 3:39:15 PM EDT
[#13]
I use old ammo liners and a 3x5 index card - works for me. That way I don't drop the hottest round in first


These were Coyote loads I was working up (never got to use them yet...)


Link Posted: 12/13/2010 4:44:23 PM EDT
[#14]
I taped a card to the inside of the lid:


Link Posted: 12/13/2010 4:52:14 PM EDT
[#15]
I cut out index cards so they fit snug to inside of the ammo box lid.  You can then draw lines and indicate which rows are which.  Plus, when working up, I always work left to right out of the box.
Link Posted: 12/14/2010 9:51:58 AM EDT
[#16]
In addition to dividing and marking a box, I learned to take a permanent marker and mark the cartridges themselves, too.  

One black mark = load A
Two black marks = load B
One red mark = load C
Etc

It only took one mis-placed step in the driveway  to transform several different carefully divided loads into an expensive pile of 10mm plinking fun.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 12/14/2010 1:14:16 PM EDT
[#17]
I write the load data on the case itself with a black sharpie and put in a 50rd Midway ammo box.

I also only have one powder in my reloading room at a time.

Furthermore, I will write the charge weight on an index card and prop it up behind the scale if working up different powder weights.

Link Posted: 12/14/2010 3:22:58 PM EDT
[#18]
I used to put a card or post-it taped to the inside of the ammo box with the ladder test powder weights, and the numbers lined up with the lines of ammo.  Until I was a couple of shots into a ladder test and knocked the box over, spilling rounds all over.  Completely ruined the test.  I ended up pulling all the bullets and salvaging the powder and cases, but it wasted a LOT of time.



Now I take the time to mark the sides of the brass with a fine pointed sharpie the powder weight of each.  Takes a little more time, but worth it for me.
Link Posted: 12/15/2010 6:31:06 AM EDT
[#19]
In addition to dividing and marking a box, I learned to take a permanent marker and mark the cartridges themselves, too.


This is what I do but I also wright the load on the case. The marks will come off when you tumble the brass.

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