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Posted: 11/18/2012 1:05:39 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/18/2012 5:25:06 PM EST by SaltyDog]
My fourteen year old son and i have decided to get into reloading, i have been reading the FAQs but i am looking for what everyone would recommend as the best set up. We plan to start reloading .223 and move onto .308, .45 acp, to name a few.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:15:36 PM EST
IMHO the RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master reloading kit is a great starting unit.

It has the basics which you'll need, then you can add onto your gear as you learn and desire to improve accuracy.

In addition to the kit, you will still need caliber specific dies, a digital caliper (Harbor Freight $12.00~), a tumbler, powder and primers also. You can start to realize savings fairly quickly and can develop your loads to match each gun you own improving accuracy over factory loads.

Here's the kit on sale: http://www.cabelas.com/product/RCBS-Rock-Chucker-Supreme-Master-Reloading-Kit/1324071.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch.cmd%3Fform_state%3DsearchForm%26N%3D0%26fsch%3Dtrue%26Nt­k%3DAllProducts%26Ntt%3Dreloading%2Bkit%26WTz_l%3DHeader%253BSearch-All%2BProducts%26x%3D18%26y%3D6&Ntt=reloading+kit&WTz_l=Header%3BSearch-All+Products



Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:16:41 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/18/2012 1:18:00 PM EST by 1911smith]
Commercial Camdex machine or Dillon 1050.


The best set-up is what you can afford. Money almost always makes the choice. I've reloaded on just about every machine made and own the most popular of them and a few not so popular machines. There isn't a bad machine out there, there's only better, make sense ?

I work with people with nice machines who've mastered them, but come for instruction because they don't know jack about cartridge building. Each machine has unique traits. I would define the cartridge you want to build first, then ask this question.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:30:38 PM EST
Originally Posted By pcsutton:
IMHO the RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master reloading kit is a great starting unit.

It has the basics which you'll need, then you can add onto your gear as you learn and desire to improve accuracy.

In addition to the kit, you will still need caliber specific dies, a digital caliper (Harbor Freight $12.00~), a tumbler, powder and primers also. You can start to realize savings fairly quickly and can develop your loads to match each gun you own improving accuracy over factory loads.

Here's the kit on sale: http://www.cabelas.com/product/RCBS-Rock-Chucker-Supreme-Master-Reloading-Kit/1324071.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2Fsearch.cmd%3Fform_state%3DsearchForm%26N%3D0%26fsch%3Dtrue%26Nt­k%3DAllProducts%26Ntt%3Dreloading%2Bkit%26WTz_l%3DHeader%253BSearch-All%2BProducts%26x%3D18%26y%3D6&Ntt=reloading+kit&WTz_l=Header%3BSearch-All+Products





Agreed! Best place to start and then decide to either stick with it or go progressive.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:50:04 PM EST
I started with a single stage and stuck with it for 20 years before graduating to a progressive machine.

My brother in law is looking to get into reloading and I told him that Rock chucker kit at Cabelas is a good place to start.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 1:55:17 PM EST
Originally Posted By pcsutton:
IMHO the RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master reloading kit is a great starting unit.

It has the basics which you'll need, then you can add onto your gear as you learn and desire to improve accuracy.

In addition to the kit, you will still need caliber specific dies, a digital caliper (Harbor Freight $12.00~), a tumbler, powder and primers also. You can start to realize savings fairly quickly and can develop your loads to match each gun you own improving accuracy over factory loads.

Here's the kit on sale: http://www.cabelas.com/product/RCBS-Rock-Chucker-Supreme-Master-Reloading-Kit/1324071.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2f Search.cmd%3Fform_state%3DsearchForm%26N%3D0%26fsch%3Dtrue%26Nt­k%3DAllProducts%26 Ntt%3Dreloading%2Bkit%26WTz_l%3DHeader%253BSearch-All%2BProducts%26x%3D18%26y%3D6&Ntt=reloading+kit&WTz_l=Header%3BSearch-All+Products





+2
Nice thing is too it will last generations. A simple well made tool. I recently recommended this kit to someone. Later he wrote me back and could not thank me enough.

Link Posted: 11/18/2012 2:38:24 PM EST
What are your thoughts on the Dillon RL 550B ?
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 2:43:13 PM EST
I think the OP's question is a little bit like asking what's the best gun or pickup truck. There are many that suit many different needs and desires.

Thank being said, I was advised by a more veteran reloader friend to start with the Dillon RL550B. I took his advice, and I have not regreted it. It was/is a great first press for me, and eventually plan to upgrade to the 650 or 1050. Dillon's warranties and customer support cannot be beat, IMHO.

They're really a class act company. Oh yeah, and I love receiving their catalogs and calendars!
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 2:52:35 PM EST
I started out with an RCBS single stage press, loaded on that for maybe 12 years or so,
then bought a Dillon RL550. Still using that blue machine after maybe 20 years or so. I think
I got it in the early 90s. I like it cause it takes out the drudgery and lets you focus on QC.

If you`re patient and somewhat mechanical minded, starting out with a progressive is not bad,
and Dillon product support is a phone call away.

Either way is worth the effort and expense.
My $.02
scruff
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 3:22:05 PM EST
I started with a Xl650 and I load for 9mm, 45ACP, 223 and 308.

I dont have any regrets on using this product,
except that i can run through a lot of componants quick.


I have always had good results using that press, even doing small test runs, and switching calibers
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 4:58:43 PM EST

Originally Posted By SaltyDog:
What are your thoughts on the Dillon RL 550B ?

Excellent choice if you want to get a single press for life but still be able to learn on it. It used standard 7/8" dies and Dillon makes caliber conversion kits for it in almost every caliber. I started with a 550B and used it to reload pistol calibers as well as .223 too. After 70K+ rds, I got tired of handling every case so I sold it (for more than I paid for it 4½ years earlier) and stepped up to an XL650 with casefeeder. Check out my post, Cheap Tips and Tricks For Dillon 550B and XL650s - Updated 1/25/2012 for some tips and tricks on the 550B before you order one as you can save some money on options.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 5:10:56 PM EST
Originally Posted By pcsutton:
IMHO the RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master reloading kit is a great starting unit.

It has the basics which you'll need, then you can add onto your gear as you learn and desire to improve accuracy.



Seconded.
Link Posted: 11/18/2012 6:21:22 PM EST
Originally Posted By Motor1:
Originally Posted By pcsutton:
IMHO the RCBS Rock Chucker Supreme Master reloading kit is a great starting unit.

It has the basics which you'll need, then you can add onto your gear as you learn and desire to improve accuracy.

In addition to the kit, you will still need caliber specific dies, a digital caliper (Harbor Freight $12.00~), a tumbler, powder and primers also. You can start to realize savings fairly quickly and can develop your loads to match each gun you own improving accuracy over factory loads.

Here's the kit on sale: http://www.cabelas.com/product/RCBS-Rock-Chucker-Supreme-Master-Reloading-Kit/1324071.uts?Ntk=AllProducts&searchPath=%2Fcatalog%2f Search.cmd%3Fform_state%3DsearchForm%26N%3D0%26fsch%3Dtrue%26Nt­k%3DAllProducts%26 Ntt%3Dreloading%2Bkit%26WTz_l%3DHeader%253BSearch-All%2BProducts%26x%3D18%26y%3D6&Ntt=reloading+kit&WTz_l=Header%3BSearch-All+Products





+2
Nice thing is too it will last generations. A simple well made tool. I recently recommended this kit to someone. Later he wrote me back and could not thank me enough.



+3. I'm running a Rock Chucker from the 80's. Runs like a brand new press. that also seems to be a pretty good deal.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 7:50:12 AM EST
My problem with a single stage is that it's limited to . . . . a single stage. The Dillon 550B can be operated as a single stage (or to be more accurate, like a combo single stage/turret press) if you want to learn each stage or concentrate on precision on each stage and then it can run as a full up progressive to make some serious ammo. Five hundred rds of 9mm, 40, or 45acp per hour isn't difficult to achieve after you become proficient with it.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 7:58:46 AM EST
Look at the Reloading Bench thread and you can see what everyone is running. Youll see alot of Dillons and Hornady's.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 8:31:50 AM EST
Dillon.

Link Posted: 11/19/2012 8:32:44 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/19/2012 8:33:31 AM EST by 1911smith]
Originally Posted By dnmccoy:
Look at the Reloading Bench thread and you can see what everyone is running. Youll see alot of Dillons and Hornady's.


A ton of Lee's and quite a few RCBS machines. Funny how we see the same things and percieve differently, isn't it ? I see a lot of RCBS and Lee equipment sitting beside Hornady and Dillon machines. Combinations of equipment are what most pictures reflect.

Link Posted: 11/19/2012 8:48:36 AM EST
i use a lyman turret press.

i bought the kit with the digital scale.

it works extremely well

set up your settings once and to change calibers just change out the heads
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 12:09:57 PM EST
I came here to ask the same question.

Thx for the info...
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 12:14:00 PM EST
Add my vote to the 550b.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 12:20:24 PM EST
Any thoughts on this as compared to the RCBS setup in the Cabela's link?


Kempf's Lee Kit
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 12:30:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/19/2012 12:32:35 PM EST by pcsutton]

Originally Posted By SaltyDog:
What are your thoughts on the Dillon RL 550B ?

They're great for bulk loading. I've never used one, however, I hear they are fairly difficult to set up and to change loads or calibers. The couple guy I know who have them set them up for one load, like 45 acp...and leave them set up for that round. They have duplicate machines for other calibers.

With the Rock Chucker set up, changing calibers is very easy and straight forward. IMHO the advantage is it allows you easily do load development.

I can load 100 .308 M-118LR clones in an hour and those are with weighed charges. Then I can load up bulk .223 blasting ammo without changing the entire machine...I just change the seating die and shell holder. I can do twice as man in an hour using the powder drop without checking each charge on the scale.

I guess it really depends on if you want to load blasting ammo in bulk or precision ammo.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 12:39:17 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/19/2012 1:30:08 PM EST by angus6]
What are your thoughts on the Dillon RL 550B ?


They're great for bulk loading. I've never used one, however, I hear they are fairly difficult to set up and to change loads or calibers. The couple guy I know who have them set them up for one load, like 45 acp...and leave them set up for that round. They have duplicate machines for other calibers.


While I didn't keep the RL550 long as I didn't care for it and moved everything over to the 1050, There is nothing difficult at all in using a RL550
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 1:35:07 PM EST
I too love my 550. Caliber changes take less than 10 minutes if I dont have it already setup on a quick change.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 5:32:50 PM EST
I glanced over... Maybe im the first here... But i am super happy with my Lee single stage and dies. While everything mentioned is great gear, one thing i havent seen is, reloading is real work and some people buy the gear and then just dont do it. So why spend all that money if you're not sure? Thats what drove my decision to stay cheap and go with a Lee setup, and here I am thousands of rounds later still enjoying it. I do have some other brand things, an rcbs trimmer for one... But the fact is i didnt want to spend alot and i didnt and i still got a great setup i am happy with.
Link Posted: 11/19/2012 9:04:57 PM EST
Dillon 550...

Team Blue
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 2:37:13 AM EST
Caliber changes on the Dillon 550b are a matter of seconds if staying with the same primer size. Switching primer sizes take me about 3 minutes.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 4:00:18 AM EST
I use two Dillon 550's for blasting ammo.
A Lee cast iron press for precision .223 for highpower.

The real decision is single stage vs progressive.

If you are a mechanical minded person who can understand the mechanics of several things going on at once as well as the effects each stage can have on the others all at the same time, a progressive is fine.

Otherwise a single stage is recommended. Single stage presses are mostly the same. It really doesn't matter, I started 30 years ago reloading on a Lee aluminum press. It served me well for many years and produced some fine ammo. I upgraded to a progressive when I had the need

When the Lee linkage died, I replaced it with a Lee cast iron single stage. I do all my depriming on the Lee as well.

Regardless, there is always a need for a good quality single stage press.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 12:12:44 PM EST

Originally Posted By Bhart89:
Caliber changes on the Dillon 550b are a matter of seconds if staying with the same primer size. Switching primer sizes take me about 3 minutes.

Unless you pony up a few bucks and get a second primer assy. Then the swap takes under 30 seconds.


Link Posted: 11/20/2012 12:21:54 PM EST

Originally Posted By pcsutton:

Originally Posted By SaltyDog:
What are your thoughts on the Dillon RL 550B ?

They're great for bulk loading. (Actually, they are good for all reloading.) I've never used one, however, I hear they are fairly difficult to set up and to change loads or calibers. (And that would be flat wrong. They are easy to do both.) The couple guy I know who have them set them up for one load, like 45 acp...and leave them set up for that round. They have duplicate machines for other calibers. (Which is not in many people's budget or ambition. Besides, some of us handload 10+ calibers and having 10 presses isn't practical or economical.)

I think the intent of the OP's question was to ask what single press setup we found 'best'. There are a goodly number of candidates and 'best' is really a case of getting a setup that accomplishes what you expect it to at an affordable and quality level. Some handload low volume and want a simple single stage, low cost press setup while others load high volume, multi calibers and want a quality progressive press that allows for affordable, easily changeable caliber conversions. The definition of the 'best' is wholly dependent upon one's expectations.
Link Posted: 11/20/2012 1:18:08 PM EST
[span style='font-weight: bold;']Originally Posted By CoSteve;
I think the intent of the OP's question was to ask what single press setup we found 'best'. There are a goodly number of candidates and 'best' is really a case of getting a setup that accomplishes what you expect it to at an affordable and quality level. Some handload low volume and want a simple single stage, low cost press setup while others load high volume, multi calibers and want a quality progressive press that allows for affordable, easily changeable caliber conversions. The definition of the 'best' is wholly dependent upon one's expectations.



Very well said. QFT.



Link Posted: 11/20/2012 1:27:13 PM EST
Originally Posted By COSteve:

Originally Posted By pcsutton:

Originally Posted By SaltyDog:
What are your thoughts on the Dillon RL 550B ?

They're great for bulk loading. (Actually, they are good for all reloading.) I've never used one, however, I hear they are fairly difficult to set up and to change loads or calibers. (And that would be flat wrong. They are easy to do both.) The couple guy I know who have them set them up for one load, like 45 acp...and leave them set up for that round. They have duplicate machines for other calibers. (Which is not in many people's budget or ambition. Besides, some of us handload 10+ calibers and having 10 presses isn't practical or economical.)

I think the intent of the OP's question was to ask what single press setup we found 'best'. There are a goodly number of candidates and 'best' is really a case of getting a setup that accomplishes what you expect it to at an affordable and quality level. Some handload low volume and want a simple single stage, low cost press setup while others load high volume, multi calibers and want a quality progressive press that allows for affordable, easily changeable caliber conversions. The definition of the 'best' is wholly dependent upon one's expectations.

And pocket book!

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