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Posted: 9/29/2011 3:05:43 PM EST
I have several sets of dies that I use about once in a decade (.257 Roberts, .270 Win etc..) Years of sitting out in my reload/laundry room cause them to get a very fine surface rust on some of their surfaces. I used a little Naval Jelly and the rust washed right off but now I'd like to put something on them to protect them to prevent this from happening again. I see RCBS has a spray just for this. I also see that Amsoil has a spray call "Amsoil Metal Protector" that gets pretty good reviews. Or there is alway WD-40 and I can't help but wonder if the RCBS and Amsoil products are just very expensive, relabeled WD-40. Any thoughs on this?
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 3:13:02 PM EST
WD-40 works fine except when it dries it leaves a gummy film, which can be cleaned off with........WD-40!
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 3:13:25 PM EST
The MP (Metal protector) is different from WD-40, I don't use it on my dies, but it's a very good product. I don't know about the RCBS product.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 3:20:06 PM EST
http://www.eezox.com/

http://www.6mmbr.com/corrosiontest.html

hands down the best rust preventing oil out there
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 3:31:23 PM EST
[Last Edit: 9/29/2011 3:37:58 PM EST by SteelonSteel]
I've been using RIG grease for years only because a small jar lasts forever.

A spray would be easier but Idealy I try to clean the crud and gunk out before storage. I have Birchwood Casey shield that I use on guns.

A paste wax would work nicely. Johnsons paste wax or even neutral shoe polish. More work to clean off and make ready again though. Probably the best method if you're going to store them for a long time in a hot garage or attic though.

I read those reports on Eezox. Looks like damn good stuff. The 11 week exposure for steel plates was incredible.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 3:39:40 PM EST
I use Boeshield T-9, from the corrosion test I saw it used in, I say it works similar to the Eezox. Seems both are sold a lot of places. I just picked the T-9 because its sold at a Marine store near me.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 6:17:20 PM EST
LPS-3. Sprays on like WD-40, and eventually dries to a hard wax after penetrating all those little cracks and crevices.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 6:45:04 PM EST
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 10:23:19 PM EST
Cosmoline.
Link Posted: 9/29/2011 10:35:12 PM EST
zip lock freezer bag and small descant pack
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:03:14 AM EST
My Pacific dies (Hornady) are hard chromed (or something) and haven't rusted. My Lee and RCBS dies will get rust on them (never on the inside - must be the sizing lube) so every now and then I spray some WD 40 or Rem-Oil on them.

They get a little rust because sometimes I don't spray something on them when I finish up for the day.

I never had a rust issue on my reloading stuff till I moved to the Richmond, VA area (because of the humidity).
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:57:55 AM EST
LPS-3. Used this in the field to protect precision parts from corrosion. Brings out moisture and provides protection.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 3:05:05 AM EST
Lay out a piece of Saran Wrap. Spray the die with some aerosol CLP. Lots of it. Roll the die up in the Saran Wrap like a burrito. That's all you need.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 3:08:38 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 3:10:42 AM EST by nhsport]
WD-40 is way better than nothing but..................

It seems I remember on this site a year or two back somebody doing a compareison of 6 or 8 different gun lubes to answer the question of 'What is the best gun lube"
Part of the test was takeing some steel samples and oiling them up then letting them sit out somewhere.
Some of the products were advertised as long term storage but as I remember it regular Breakfree CLP was right up there with the top 2 or 3 best products as far as corrision resistance.

One of my "To do" projects is to grab a spray can of CLP and hose down all my die sets
I only have non aerosol CLP at this point but this is one of the few uses where the messy spray can would be best


I like the way the guy above me thinks, I think I will do just this with about 2/3 of the dies I own that I hardly ever use
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:08:11 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 6:09:24 AM EST by Bubbatheredneck]
I toss a few of these every year in my die boxes.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=154282

I ask for new ones every Christmas.

Never had a problem with rust on my dies since I started doing this.

Nothing to clean off of the die before using them either.



Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:13:41 AM EST
I use BF CLP. No particular reason other than it sits out on my bench, and is handy. If its good enough for my firearms, should be good enough for my dies/press.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:33:58 AM EST
Break Free CLP for storage. Guns or Dies.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 9:05:22 AM EST
+1 on rem-oil.

great for cleaning dies and rust prevention. it's my go-to for most lube applications.

works great on reloading press rams, too.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 10:48:43 AM EST
[Last Edit: 9/30/2011 10:51:03 AM EST by 1911smith]
As seen on TV.... PB Blaster.

I think an aweful lot of my reloading dies but think even more of my Snap On tools. After use each tool is wiped down with PB Blaster using red shop towel. Some tools see regular use, others are highly specialized tools that are used at overhaul intervals up to 5 years. Tools are kept in truck shop that's subject to humidity. Never a rust issue. Some stuff is hardened bare tool steel without chrome coating. That steel rusts quickly. Thin film of PB and no worries.

Dies kept in airtite tupperware, coated with PB should stay rust free forever. WD40 is a far second from PB.

Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 11:57:27 AM EST
Vapor-phase Corrosion Inhibitors will prevent rust in a closed container.

Order some pieces and put it in the die boxes.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 12:11:49 PM EST
I line the die box with two layers of VCI paper and line the top of the box with one. Seems to work so far and no issues with having to clean the dies.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 12:19:08 PM EST
Originally Posted By bullofspadez:
I use Boeshield T-9, from the corrosion test I saw it used in, I say it works similar to the Eezox. Seems both are sold a lot of places. I just picked the T-9 because its sold at a Marine store near me.

I use T-9 all the time, my only complaint is I wish it had a faster evaporating solvent. It's available at Sears places that have tools among other options, and is not terribly expensive. Mild odor and I haven't had any problem with skin contact irritation.

The VCI paper would be the most convenient option for storing something in a sealed container. Wouldn't have anything to clean up the next time you went to use it.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:10:16 PM EST
Originally Posted By Wingman26:
Eezox is the very best, but quite frankly WD-40 works darn good for rust prevention.



Some people think WD-40 isn't too good on rust prevention, so let me share my little

experiment, in 1992 I was selling industrial chemicals, a new company came to me trying

to sell their WD-40 clone, claimed it was a better lubricant and better rust

preventative, so I conducted my own tests, I found that it was about equal in lube

quality (not too great), for a rust prevention test I took 3 regular paper clips, one I

left untreated, 1 was treated to WD-40, and one treated with the "wanna be", I sprayed

them down, let them sit a few minutes then blotted off the excess, I put each one in a

one oz clear glass bottle filled with tap water, I labeled and dated those containers,

the date was 8/6/1992. When I looked at them the next morning I was surprised, the

untreated one already showed significant rust, the other two were like new, after about

30 days the "wanna be" started showing definite signs of rust, the WD-40 was still clean.

I just pulled those bottles out of my desk, its been 19 years since I made up those test

bottles, the plain water control is heavily rusted, the "wanna be" is heavily rusted, the

WD-40? Not a trace of rust, even after 19 years.


That's a damn good endorsement, right there.

Link Posted: 9/30/2011 1:48:20 PM EST
Originally Posted By sleepercaprice1:
Originally Posted By Wingman26:
Eezox is the very best, but quite frankly WD-40 works darn good for rust prevention.



Some people think WD-40 isn't too good on rust prevention, so let me share my little

experiment, in 1992 I was selling industrial chemicals, a new company came to me trying

to sell their WD-40 clone, claimed it was a better lubricant and better rust

preventative, so I conducted my own tests, I found that it was about equal in lube

quality (not too great), for a rust prevention test I took 3 regular paper clips, one I

left untreated, 1 was treated to WD-40, and one treated with the "wanna be", I sprayed

them down, let them sit a few minutes then blotted off the excess, I put each one in a

one oz clear glass bottle filled with tap water, I labeled and dated those containers,

the date was 8/6/1992. When I looked at them the next morning I was surprised, the

untreated one already showed significant rust, the other two were like new, after about

30 days the "wanna be" started showing definite signs of rust, the WD-40 was still clean.

I just pulled those bottles out of my desk, its been 19 years since I made up those test

bottles, the plain water control is heavily rusted, the "wanna be" is heavily rusted, the

WD-40? Not a trace of rust, even after 19 years.


That's a damn good endorsement, right there.



The only reason I don't like Eezox is the Trichloroethylene. Just makes it a bit nastier than the T-9 in my eyes...
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 2:39:28 PM EST
Originally Posted By Wingman26:
Eezox is the very best, but quite frankly WD-40 works darn good for rust prevention.



Some people think WD-40 isn't too good on rust prevention, so let me share my little

experiment, in 1992 I was selling industrial chemicals, a new company came to me trying

to sell their WD-40 clone, claimed it was a better lubricant and better rust

preventative, so I conducted my own tests, I found that it was about equal in lube

quality (not too great), for a rust prevention test I took 3 regular paper clips, one I

left untreated, 1 was treated to WD-40, and one treated with the "wanna be", I sprayed

them down, let them sit a few minutes then blotted off the excess, I put each one in a

one oz clear glass bottle filled with tap water, I labeled and dated those containers,

the date was 8/6/1992. When I looked at them the next morning I was surprised, the

untreated one already showed significant rust, the other two were like new, after about

30 days the "wanna be" started showing definite signs of rust, the WD-40 was still clean.

I just pulled those bottles out of my desk, its been 19 years since I made up those test

bottles, the plain water control is heavily rusted, the "wanna be" is heavily rusted, the

WD-40? Not a trace of rust, even after 19 years.


I bet the WD-40 people would love to hear this story.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 5:48:22 PM EST
Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:
I toss a few of these every year in my die boxes.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=154282

I ask for new ones every Christmas.

Never had a problem with rust on my dies since I started doing this.

Nothing to clean off of the die before using them either.





There's some higher end dessicant bags that turn pink when they're 'used up' then you just microwave them as per mfg instructions which dries them out and you can keep reusing them for a long time. I don't know who sells them or how much they cost, I got mine for free, but it might be worth looking into if you buy new ones each year.

I believe the original use was for absorbing water vapor in compressed air hoses via some sort of air pig type chamber, we had a huge box of them laying around and the boss said we could toss em in the trash or take them home.
Link Posted: 9/30/2011 6:33:16 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 11:45:19 AM EST
Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:
I toss a few of these every year in my die boxes.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=154282

I ask for new ones every Christmas.

Never had a problem with rust on my dies since I started doing this.

Nothing to clean off of the die before using them either.





I believe this is what the various die manufacturers use, I'd suggest putting the whole box/case into a "Ziplock " bag after using them inside the box. VCI tech. is one of my favorite "new" things out there, heck 44Mag.com even sells VCI ziplock bags.
Link Posted: 10/1/2011 6:40:07 PM EST
[Last Edit: 10/1/2011 6:41:13 PM EST by waawaaweenie]
Originally Posted By wilNva:
Originally Posted By Bubbatheredneck:
I toss a few of these every year in my die boxes.

http://www.midwayusa.com/viewProduct/?productNumber=154282

I ask for new ones every Christmas.

Never had a problem with rust on my dies since I started doing this.

Nothing to clean off of the die before using them either.





There's some higher end dessicant bags that turn pink when they're 'used up' then you just microwave them as per mfg instructions which dries them out and you can keep reusing them for a long time. I don't know who sells them or how much they cost, I got mine for free, but it might be worth looking into if you buy new ones each year.

I believe the original use was for absorbing water vapor in compressed air hoses via some sort of air pig type chamber, we had a huge box of them laying around and the boss said we could toss em in the trash or take them home.


here is a link
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