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Posted: 11/2/2009 9:27:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/2/2009 9:29:35 AM EST by FailureDrill-P099]
I have been looking to buy a Garand. I remembered my uncle had a Garand he showed me some time in the early 90's. It was his brothers who served in WW2. When he died his father gave it to my uncle some time in the 70's. So I called to see if he was interested in selling it to me before I buy one and what the condition of the rifle is.

I am very knowledgeable with modern firearms from my LE carrier but know nothing about the M1 Garand. What marks and #'s on the rifle should I be looking for or ask my uncle to tell me about. I live in another state so face to face with the rifle is not happening at this time. I have been looking at the CMP rifles and the ones on AIM at this time but I figure a family rifle would and should not be passed up.

Thanks guys.
Link Posted: 11/2/2009 9:37:45 AM EST
[Last Edit: 11/2/2009 9:40:43 AM EST by ma96782]
Start your education here.............

http://www.northcapepubs.com/m1gar.htm

There are other books but, this is a free education.

Next, know that..............

Over the past 65 years, most M1 rifles have been arsenal rebuilt, refinished, rebarreled or repaired at least once and often several times. Most will show signs of service (often considerable) and replacement of various parts. They are seldom encountered with all original parts and original finish as delivered from the manufacturer. Such "original" rifles, even in well-used condition, are highly prized by collectors.


The quote was taken from CMPs web site.

So..........dream. But, don't expect too much.

Aloha, Mark


Link Posted: 11/2/2009 11:00:21 AM EST
I know they got the rifle some time in the mid 50's and has been in the family since then. It was not his service rifle. Im not expecting much. Im sure its well used and beat up just wanted to know about markings and what is more desirable with these rifles. If it is way beat up I would like to buy a new stock for it and get it reparked if needed.
Link Posted: 11/2/2009 11:16:48 AM EST
there are many good books available on the Garand. Duff, Hatcher. Canfield. Senich are a few of the authors. Between those guys and the Garand websites you will get more info than you will ever need.
Link Posted: 11/2/2009 10:20:49 PM EST
Look for a circle P on the stock at the comb in the grip on the bottom. Left side near the rear sight see if you find a Few letters in a box which indicates a rebuild. Pull the operating rod back and check the barrel on the left side for the year . Should say SA HRA and many other markings with many numbers. Usually the year will be the last two digits . Mine is 44. Use the serial to determine what year it was made by using google. Do not put M1 in your search parameter but Garand Serial or Garand Barrel dates and you will find a wealth of knowledge. DO NOT refinish till you do your research as it can devalue an M1 by a few hundred dollars.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 8:26:59 AM EST
As noted above amny garands were rebuilt, particularly in the late 50's and through the 60's. If you have a WWII era barrel the odds improve that it may not have had a major arsenal rebuild. The lack of a cartouche indicating a rebuild is also an indication, but stocks are easy to replace so it really tells you very little.

Once you confirm the receiver serial matches the date on the barrel, you need to check various parts to ensure they are "correct" for the era of the receiver and barrel. These will include minor changes in parts like the sights, gas cylinder nut, etc.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 9:59:37 AM EST
I like Scott Duff's books. I have his Garand Series.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 1:47:09 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/3/2009 1:47:56 PM EST by 30Caliber]
Garands and garand parts weren't very available back in those days. A lot of the rifles from back then were salvaged (welded) from scrapped receivers. That's when the two-groove barrels started popping up (a 1903A3 barrel turned down and sleeved into the stub of an otherwise unservicible M1 barrel).

Post some photos, man. We like to see them.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 2:21:54 PM EST
When I get it I will post some pics. My mother is going to bring the rifle with her when she comes for Thanksgiving week so Its still a few weeks away but I'm excited.
Link Posted: 11/3/2009 5:00:26 PM EST
Originally Posted By DakotaFAL:
As noted above amny garands were rebuilt, particularly in the late 50's and through the 60's. If you have a WWII era barrel the odds improve that it may not have had a major arsenal rebuild. The lack of a cartouche indicating a rebuild is also an indication, but stocks are easy to replace so it really tells you very little.

Once you confirm the receiver serial matches the date on the barrel, you need to check various parts to ensure they are "correct" for the era of the receiver and barrel. These will include minor changes in parts like the sights, gas cylinder nut, etc.


Why? This has nothing to do with the performance of that weapon.
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