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Posted: 3/10/2009 6:01:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/10/2009 6:02:03 PM EDT by Mach2Nick]
Hopefully I'll be approved mid Summer and I'm wondering if anyone's tried ultrasonically cleaning their supps?
I think a cheap one is a few hundred$$ but can be used for more than just supps.
Looks like all you do is make a solution and let er run for awhile.  
Has it been tried?


Nick
Link Posted: 3/11/2009 7:50:56 PM EDT
What suppressor are you trying to clean?

My understanding is you can't use ultrasonic with aluminum cans. If your trying to clean a SS 22lr can, the best way is 50/50 hydrogen peroxide/vinegar, that shit is amazing! just don't get it on you and make sure you dispose of it properly, also NEVER use it on aluminum....
Link Posted: 3/12/2009 10:48:06 AM EDT
haven't used my enough to clean it. But after the 1st outing (700rds) with it I threw it in the tank.  Quite a bit of unburnt gun powder was at the bottom of the tank & the baffles didn't have any build-up, though they are stained black.

It's aluminum.  Time will tell if it falls apart (I'm guessing it won't or when it does it will be worn out by then)
Link Posted: 3/12/2009 9:20:39 PM EDT
I have a Crest 1/2 gallon heated ultrasonic cleaner.  I haven't used it on a suppressor, but it cleans everything else real well, including aluminum.
Link Posted: 3/14/2009 6:34:14 AM EDT
Have you ever tried putting a piece of aluminum foil (see kitchen drawer) and let it run for a while.  I heard this tests if it will damage aluminum, if small holes appear no good, no holes = good to go.
Link Posted: 3/14/2009 7:22:59 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2009 7:25:30 AM EDT by Glock35]
actual the manual states this is to test if the unit is functioning properly.

auto shops uses ultrasonics to clean parts too.  A lot of alum.
Link Posted: 3/14/2009 7:52:30 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/14/2009 7:53:41 AM EDT by JohnStoner]
Leading to the next question, if it puts tiny holes does that mean it is functioning correctly, or if it creates no damage its functioning correctly?

Edit:  I'm interested because I would rather not pay $150 to clean out a sealed aluminum .22LR suppressor.  I don't have a USC yet, but am looking around.  I'm highly interested in finding out if its safe via experience from those who have done it.
Link Posted: 3/14/2009 2:42:51 PM EDT
An ultrasonic cleaner that eats holes in aluminum foil *IS* operating correctly.    

It will erode a bit from the surface, there's a lot of stuff happening in that tank.  

If you can is made of aluminum foil, I wouldn't try it.... But yeah thicker cans can run ultrasonic but it WILL chew a little off the surface.
Link Posted: 3/14/2009 3:53:47 PM EDT
If it's a sealed can then forget ultrasonic cleaning, especially a .22 can.
Been there and done that.
I bought two commercial units and used one for my guns and they will not remove the lead/carbon deposit that builds up in the can.
If you are going to put any significant volume of .22 through it then get a can you can take apart.
Everything else doesn't need cleaning as long as it is copper jacketed and not exposed lead.
Link Posted: 3/15/2009 10:44:24 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/15/2009 10:44:36 AM EDT by JohnStoner]
That's what I figured from research, just hoping for a different answer than reality I guess.  Guess I'll pay the $150 to have it cleaned and soak it after every couple hundred rounds or so.
Link Posted: 3/15/2009 5:37:15 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/15/2009 5:39:50 PM EDT by Mach2Nick]
Originally Posted By Jerad:
What suppressor are you trying to clean?

My understanding is you can't use ultrasonic with aluminum cans. If your trying to clean a SS 22lr can, the best way is 50/50 hydrogen peroxide/vinegar, that shit is amazing! just don't get it on you and make sure you dispose of it properly, also NEVER use it on aluminum....


Don't have anything in my possesion yet.  I was told the only one that would need cleaning on a regular basis would be the .22 .
This was a topic of discussion locally.  We had a US cleaner for doing fuel injectors when I worked in parts which seemed to get the caked on crap off pretty well but they were only dipped in the end which is stainless I think.
I guess nothing comes easy.  I'll have to pull it apart and scrub.
I am getting an aluminum Mite.

Nick


Link Posted: 3/17/2009 5:48:53 PM EDT
I used Simple Green years ago in an ultrasonic cleaner... It took the finish off my suppressor (Moly Resin) after 10 mins. Be careful.
Link Posted: 3/17/2009 6:14:30 PM EDT
Ultrasonic cleaners, as a rule, require a water-based cleaning agent. Water is not the best thing for aluminum. Although you can safely use it, you need to plan on completely drying the suppressor after cleaning. This is not always easy in suppressors, as many of the recesses trap water, which will eventually corrode the aluminum.

Your cleaning solvent is really important. By all means stay away from Simple Green. It is exceptionally alkaline (ph=9), and it will strip anodizing (including hard anodize). It also doesn't rinse out worth a hoot and leaves a gooey mess in various suppressor recesses. If you feel you must use an US cleaner, use the solutions recomended and sold by the US cleaner's manufacturer. They know their chemistry.
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 8:57:13 AM EDT
Originally Posted By okent:
I bought two commercial units and used one for my guns and they will not remove the lead/carbon deposit that builds up in the can.


Odd.  A guy on Silencertalk says his M4-2000 baffles come shiney clean when he puts his can in his U/S cleaner.
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 3:33:34 PM EDT
the only suppressor that really need the cleaning are 10/22 and the pistons/booter on pistols silencers. other than that u can virtualy run the silencer dirty all you want.
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 6:11:39 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 4/29/2009 6:27:56 PM EDT by okent]
Originally Posted By markm:
Originally Posted By okent:
I bought two commercial units and used one for my guns and they will not remove the lead/carbon deposit that builds up in the can.


Odd.  A guy on Silencertalk says his M4-2000 baffles come shiney clean when he puts his can in his U/S cleaner.


I know a guy who says he blocks out the radio signals by wrapping his head in aluminum foil: thats odd.

.223 does not equal .22lr as far as crud in a suppressor.  One leaves carbon and the other lead.

I have been down this road.  Here's my first hand experience.

I picked up my COMMERCIAL ultrasonic cleaner and cleaning solution from a Crest dealer at the shot show in Vegas a couple of years ago.  Specifically made for cleaning guns and gun parts.  
It WILL NOT clean the internals of a sealed .22lr can to the point of shiney clean.

I have a titanium AWC Archangel that I have run through many back to back cycles(read 2+ hours).  I also have a fiberoptic scope I used to inspect the can afterward.   I have tried this multiple times.  It will remove the carbon but won't remove the baked on/caked on lead deposits in suppressor.

If there is some kind special technique to make these work then I would really like to know.  I have a 2K ultrasonic cleaner that won't do it.

Don't waste your money on this fellas.  Spend it on ammo and a .22 can you can take apart.
YMMV
Link Posted: 4/29/2009 6:19:27 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TORQ:
the only suppressor that really need the cleaning are 10/22 and the pistons/booter on pistols silencers. other than that u can virtualy run the silencer dirty all you want.


The QD lock on my G5 gets full of carbon and makes removing the can impossible. I give it the WD40 + ultrasonic treatment.
Link Posted: 4/30/2009 5:25:24 AM EDT
Originally Posted By okent:

I have a titanium AWC Archangel that I have run through many back to back cycles(read 2+ hours).  I also have a fiberoptic scope I used to inspect the can afterward.   I have tried this multiple times.  It will remove the carbon but won't remove the baked on/caked on lead deposits in suppressor.



That's what I'm after.  I have no need to remove lead.  I don't shoot supressed rimfire.  But I'd like to get the carbon off my baffles to check out the wear and the mild baffle strike I have going on in there.

For the most part, I can keep the mount and blast chamber clean with manual cleaning.
Link Posted: 4/30/2009 12:56:51 PM EDT
What you will notice is that it will get spots very clean and other areas it will look like nothing has come off at all.
From what I can tell it is due to the harmonics of the cleaner in relation to the suppressor.  Some of the expensive units will have two or more "generators" to minimize this issue but all will have this effect.

Also, a dirty suppressor will be more quiet.
Link Posted: 4/30/2009 1:33:06 PM EDT
Originally Posted By okent:
What you will notice is that it will get spots very clean and other areas it will look like nothing has come off at all.
From what I can tell it is due to the harmonics of the cleaner in relation to the suppressor.  Some of the expensive units will have two or more "generators" to minimize this issue but all will have this effect.


Cool.  I'll save my money.

Also, a dirty suppressor will be more quiet.


I've heard this, but I can't tell a difference.
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