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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 3/14/2011 5:35:24 AM EST
What is a good set of sling swivels?

Can I dry-fire without snap caps?
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 6:02:44 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 6:19:29 AM EST by frog5215]
Mike's Uncle.
If you bought the gun new, you might peruse the owner's manual; if not Ruger will send a manual free, and probably on online, too.
The factory the 10/22 isn't damaged by dry firing, not withstanding self styled experts.
I believe a #6 dry anchor for guns damaged be dry firing works well.

You now, a little logic dictates that semiauto that doesn't lock the bolt on a empty magazine ought to prevent such damage, if well designed..
The firing pin prevents the from striking the breech.

Many 10/22s are firing about every magazine; i.e. time you go empty.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 6:02:56 AM EST
I am not aware of any company that makes snap caps in .22 calibre. Dry fire will damage the firing pin.
Can't help with swivels.







i
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 6:03:03 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 6:04:34 AM EST by Holloway]
1) Uncle Mikes
2) Yes, but get some snap caps when you can. http://blackdogmachinellc.net/22-long-rifle-dummy-rounds.aspx
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 6:08:43 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/14/2011 6:09:30 AM EST by Afterwork_Ninja]
I have some blue aluminum .22 snap caps, but the rimfires chew the shit out of the rim. Before too long they won't extract. That's why I was wondering if they are necessary.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 6:18:38 AM EST
I called Ruger and they said it is safe to dry-fire the 10/22.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 7:47:52 AM EST
I purchased some Grovtec swivels from Brownells.. made in Milwaukie, OR. They are really well made.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 8:15:31 AM EST
Taken from the factory supplied instruction manual...

"8. With the muzzle pointed in a safe direction, push the safety to the “off”
position and pull the trigger to decock it. The rifle can be “dry fired” for
practice as long as it is empty and pointed in a safe direction
."
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 10:07:54 AM EST
if you have the aluminum barrel band, Uncle Mike's sells a set of 1" sling swivels that will mount to the band in front. it also comes with two screw in studs in cast you want to mount them on a rifle with the plastic barrel band, or on a rifle without the band. available in blued or nickel plated to match the stainless versions.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 10:58:58 AM EST
The packaging of the Blue AZoom snap caps says not to dry fire them. As you've noticed, it eats up the rim.

There is an orange plastic snap cap (not a stiff brittle plastic) that handles dry firing pretty well. You can get a bunch of shots in before you have to chuck it.

A question about the Ruger 10/22...when you dry fire, does the firing pin slam into the back of the bolt, or is there a recess that it goes into? I'll have to look closer at mine when I get home.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 11:27:37 AM EST

The hammer hits the bolt, the firing pin is inertial and and prevents the bolt head recess to hit the barrel.
Link Posted: 3/14/2011 1:50:27 PM EST
Even IF the 10/22 instruction manual didn't say it is OK to dry fire (and it does)...

AND

EvenIF Ruger wasn't on record everywhere saying the 10/22 is OK to dry fire (which they are)...






A new firing pin is all of $4.
A new barrel is all of $40.
It would take thousands of dry-fires to harm either.

That's a lot cheaper than thousands of rounds... even of .22.
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 9:57:36 AM EST
[Last Edit: 3/16/2011 10:01:11 AM EST by KB7DX]
Originally Posted By FreeFloater:
The packaging of the Blue AZoom snap caps says not to dry fire them. As you've noticed, it eats up the rim.

There is an orange plastic snap cap (not a stiff brittle plastic) that handles dry firing pretty well. You can get a bunch of shots in before you have to chuck it.

A question about the Ruger 10/22...when you dry fire, does the firing pin slam into the back of the bolt, or is there a recess that it goes into? I'll have to look closer at mine when I get home.

The 10/22 uses a firing pin "stop pin" for lack of a better term. This is the roll pin that is installed through the bolt. This roll pin goes through a slotted hole in the firing pin stopping it just short of striking the breech face.
ETA–– Part number 22 in this drawing. 10/22 schematic

Link Posted: 3/16/2011 2:27:16 PM EST
Originally Posted By KB7DX:
Originally Posted By FreeFloater:
The packaging of the Blue AZoom snap caps says not to dry fire them. As you've noticed, it eats up the rim.

There is an orange plastic snap cap (not a stiff brittle plastic) that handles dry firing pretty well. You can get a bunch of shots in before you have to chuck it.

A question about the Ruger 10/22...when you dry fire, does the firing pin slam into the back of the bolt, or is there a recess that it goes into? I'll have to look closer at mine when I get home.

The 10/22 uses a firing pin "stop pin" for lack of a better term. This is the roll pin that is installed through the bolt. This roll pin goes through a slotted hole in the firing pin stopping it just short of striking the breech face.
ETA–– Part number 22 in this drawing. 10/22 schematic



I think that the proper term is "firing pin retaining pin". Because of that, it IS SAFE to dry-fire a 10/22. With excessive dry-firing, it is theoretically possible to wear down either the firing pin or the firing pin retaining pin, but it would probably take a level of dry-firing that would border on decades of OCD.

If someone just can't stand the thought that somewhere, over an entire lifetime of dry-firing, something has a SLIGHT chance of happening, buy an extra firing pin and firing pin retaining pin. Put them in your drawer, and in the very small chance that you ever need them, there they are. But most likely, you will never need them, and after you die, your kids will find them and say "What are these? I dunno, throw them in the garbage, too."
Link Posted: 3/16/2011 8:12:19 PM EST
I got Snap-Caps for .22 at MidWayUSA. I am sure others have them too. On some of my .22 firearms you NEVER want to dry fire them. The Ruger 10/22 is NOT one of these. As stated before, this is covered in Rugers literature.

If you don't want to leave the rifle cocked you can lower the hammer safely in a simple manner. Pull the bolt back about half way. Pull the trigger as you slowly ease the bolt forward. The hammer will drop onto the bolt and follow it down safely. With a few tries you will find exactly the right spot to perform this from.

Ruger builds tough firearms. They are made to take a beating. I have a couple of 10/22's that are over 40 years old and are still running like new with all original parts.
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