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12/6/2019 7:27:02 PM
Posted: 12/13/2013 1:11:46 AM EST
I have been pulling my hair out trying to decide on a safe. I found a cannon armory series A64 for a smoking deal but I have two problems. One is I don't think it will fit in my undersized basement door which sucks because I don't want it in my living room. I need a safe so I might have to put it on the main floor.

The listed size is 72" H, 48" W, 30" D. My front door has about 32" of opening. The safe description says 30" includes handle. I called Cannon and the guy said the depth is about 32 and to give myself 35" to be safe. Is the rep off or is there someway to figure out if this will really fit?

Thanks.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 4:57:50 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/13/2013 4:58:16 AM EST by heeler1]
if the listed size is 30 inches with handle it should easily fit.
From my experience the guys moving the safe in always do it with the safes ships wheel removed.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 5:36:31 AM EST
If you pop out the hinge pins on your door that will give you a few extra inches of room in the doorway. Removing the handle from the safe door will also give you a little more wiggle room.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 6:00:41 AM EST
When my last safe arrived, I discovered that it would not fit through the door into the storage room where I had planned to put it. I dismantled the storage room door frame and reinstalled it when the safe was in the room - that safe will stay with the house forever!
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 6:48:43 AM EST
There are three depth measurements that tend to be found in gun safe literature. Everybody does it differently. The first is the depth of the body. This is the measurement from steel to steel, front to back. The second is what I call the moving measurement. This is the measurement from the back of the safe to the front, including the additional depth of the dial, hinges, and handle hub. The third is the assembled depth. This is the measurement from the back to the front, including the additional depth of the handle spokes (which are tapered away from the safe) when installed.

You only need to be worried about the first two. If a company uses the first method, simply add 2" to that number. I rarely see gun safes with a body deeper than 28", which would put you at a maximum of 30". Most are 26".

The taller safes tend to have more height problems than depth problems when it comes to moving them.


Link Posted: 12/13/2013 7:31:23 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/13/2013 12:57:34 PM EST by TheSafeGuy]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By a1abdj:
I rarely see gun safes with a body deeper than 28", which would put you at a maximum of 30". Most are 26".

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This particular safe is very wide (48 inch). It's common to make these wider safes with more depth to provide the stability necessary to prevent tipping when the door is opened 90º. It's only an issue on the showroom floor where it's up on a pallet and not anchored, but dealer pressure has prevailed and extra depth is a common solution. So, the 30" depth of the steel box without hardware is correct. With handle spokes removed, you should expect an overall depth of 32 minimum. Also, the Canon line does not have external hinges.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 9:13:12 AM EST
[Last Edit: 12/13/2013 9:21:13 AM EST by SEWERAT]
Awesome, thanks guys. it looks like I might have to get the cannon 45. Damn I want to go bigger but I don't think I can fit this one.

And thanks safeguy. Wish I could afford one of yours, someday I hope.
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 12:58:06 PM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By SEWERAT:
And thanks safeguy. Wish I could afford one of yours, someday I hope.
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No worries, I am here to help, not sell...
Link Posted: 12/13/2013 1:21:48 PM EST
It's also not rocket surgery to pull your door trim. Might be time for a new look on the basement door.
Link Posted: 12/14/2013 9:35:22 AM EST
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By robpiat:
It's also not rocket surgery to pull your door trim. Might be time for a new look on the basement door.
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Normally you would be right. i gutted this victorian and remodeled my 1905 house when i bought it, but my basement door is a backyard walkout and encased in a limestone foundation. The frame is set into to the 17" thick stone and I would have to cut 6" of limestone block foundation away. Plus I don't think it would clear the turn since the door is on the side under the addition I put onto the kitchen on the first floor.
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