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Posted: 6/23/2015 10:03:31 AM EDT
I guess I snugged a grip screw on my Beretta 92FS Compact down just a little too much, and I stripped the hole for the allen wrench. The hole was a little worn and I was going to replace the screws with slotted screws anyway.





I saw a video on YT of a guy JB Welding an allen wrench into the stripped head of a grip screw on a Ruger .22.  He popped it out 24 hrs later with ease.  I picked up some JB Weld yesterday and have new slotted screws coming tomorrow, so should I go for it?  Anything else to consider?


 









**Update**




I tried the JB Weld since I couldn't get another wrench head/bit in there.  The JBW broke loose, unfortunately.  I decided to call one of our aircraft mechanics at work, who also happens to be a gun guy.  He said he'd grab some tools and swing by the house on his way home.  Backing the screw out with extractors wasn't successful.  Eventually, he took so much metal off that the screw head came off.  He was then able to use a small bit to drill through the body of the screw and then extract it out.  We had to guy buy some stuff to re-tap the threads as they got ever-so-slightly dinged, but after all was said and done he was able to get it out!  He saved me a lot of money on shipping to Beretta, or taking it to a 'smith.  






Link Posted: 6/23/2015 10:08:32 AM EDT
[#1]
or you can very carefully use a dremel to slot the hex screw and then get it out that way...

but the JB weld trick does work
Link Posted: 6/23/2015 11:10:00 AM EDT
[#2]

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Quoted:


or you can very carefully use a dremel to slot the hex screw and then get it out that way...



but the JB weld trick does work
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I had that Dremel thought, but unfortunately the screws are a little below being flush/slightly above the grip.  I didn't see the rubber washers/O-rings that came with the grips until after they were installed, hence the reason for trying to take them off again.  Thanks, BURN!  

 
Link Posted: 6/23/2015 5:35:26 PM EDT
[#3]
That should work but I'd stuff whatever I could fit in there until I got it to come out

Torx keys work a lot of the time.
Link Posted: 6/23/2015 7:11:18 PM EDT
[#4]

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Quoted:


That should work but I'd stuff whatever I could fit in there until I got it to come out



Torx keys work a lot of the time.
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One of the mechanics at work suggested taking the next largest size wrench and trying to tap it in the hole first.  Maybe I'll see if I can get that to work.

 



How awesome would I be if I shot a match with an allen wrench JB Welded to my gun?!  lol  
Link Posted: 6/23/2015 7:40:38 PM EDT
[#5]
I have metric, standard, and torx wrenches.  Some combination of those will usually get out a buggered hex screw if you haven't totally cored it out.  





A reverse running drill bit will take it out too.  Between the heat and friction, the screw will usually come out before you drill through it.  (harbor freight)


 



If you are using a standard L shaped wrench, try using a screwdriver handle type with bits.  You can apply much more pressure to the remaining flats in the bottom of the screw.  Sometimes lapping the end of the bit until it is flat and sharp will help on this.  




(I worked production assembly with soft stainless hex buttons and flat heads.  Stripped all the time.)




I have even used a sharp center punch and a light hammer to tap the screw in the left/loose direction to unfreeze them.  Flat head 4-40 screws, the fucking devil.
Link Posted: 6/23/2015 9:52:39 PM EDT
[#6]

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Quoted:


I have metric, standard, and torx wrenches.  Some combination of those will usually get out a buggered hex screw if you haven't totally cored it out.  



A reverse running drill bit will take it out too.  Between the heat and friction, the screw will usually come out before you drill through it.  (harbor freight)

 



If you are using a standard L shaped wrench, try using a screwdriver handle type with bits.  You can apply much more pressure to the remaining flats in the bottom of the screw.  Sometimes lapping the end of the bit until it is flat and sharp will help on this.  





(I worked production assembly with soft stainless hex buttons and flat heads.  Stripped all the time.)





I have even used a sharp center punch and a light hammer to tap the screw in the left/loose direction to unfreeze them.  Flat head 4-40 screws, the fucking devil.

View Quote
Good idea with the screwdriver and bits.  I might have a bit small enough, but might buy some if I don't.  Probably a good thing to have around.  Thanks!

 
Link Posted: 6/23/2015 10:03:18 PM EDT
[#7]
Talk to the A&P's in the shop. We have all kinds of ways to remove stripped screws.
Link Posted: 6/23/2015 11:46:17 PM EDT
[#8]
Right sized extractor bit should turn it out.
Link Posted: 6/24/2015 9:04:21 AM EDT
[#9]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Talk to the A&P's in the shop. We have all kinds of ways to remove stripped screws.
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Man, I'd love to bring it in to have the guys take care of it.  If I brought a gun onto company premises, I'd be fired so fast that fired doesn't seem like the proper word to describe it, lol.

 
Link Posted: 6/24/2015 2:17:46 PM EDT
[#10]
The other thing you can do as long as you have two opposing corners that are not too striped out is find a flat tip screw driver that is barely loner then the opposing corners and hammer it into the screw and unscrew...
Link Posted: 6/24/2015 4:20:25 PM EDT
[#11]

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Quoted:


The other thing you can do as long as you have two opposing corners that are not too striped out is find a flat tip screw driver that is barely loner then the opposing corners and hammer it into the screw and unscrew...
View Quote
Great idea, but it's pretty rounded out at this point.  I tried tapping a slightly larger wrench into it, but it didn't work.  I thought I had it for sure at one point.  Holy crap, I know I didn't crank down on that sucker, but damn!  

 



The screws showed up earlier today.  I leave on a 5 day trip tomorrow so I won't be able to do anything until next week.  Thought about setting the wrench, but since the gun is still usable I'd kinda rather not have the allen welded to it in case my wife needed it.  
Link Posted: 6/25/2015 12:45:33 PM EDT
[#12]
depending on how bad it is a stripping you can usually hammer in a slightly larger torx head bit and remove it with that.
Link Posted: 6/25/2015 11:26:22 PM EDT
[#13]
If you use a bit in a screwdriver for extra pressure and.... take the bit to the grinder and grind the end flat and square. Do not remove the burr, leave it sharp. Then lean down on it as hard as possible and apply slow easy pressure. You might get lucky.

Maybe try some superglue and accelerator too if the other doesn't work.
Link Posted: 6/26/2015 1:38:07 PM EDT
[#14]
5min epoxy works good too and it sets a lot faster
Link Posted: 6/26/2015 10:51:12 PM EDT
[#15]
As long as it wasn't cross threaded or Loctited,
Insert left handed drill bit at low speed: here

If the screw doesn't back out the head will be removed allowing you to remove the grips and then use small vise grips on the remaining shank.
Link Posted: 6/29/2015 11:19:51 AM EDT
[#16]
Thanks again guys.  Sorry for not checking in; still out on my trip, but should be home tonight.  Will fiddle with it some using these other methods!  





It wasn't crossthreaded, and definitely no Loktite.  


 
Link Posted: 7/1/2015 4:31:25 PM EDT
[#17]
Update in OP.  
 



Thanks again for all the advice, fellas!  Much appreciated!
Link Posted: 7/1/2015 9:55:51 PM EDT
[#18]
Everybody loves a happy ending!

Glad you got it worked out.
Link Posted: 7/2/2015 9:02:40 AM EDT
[#19]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:


Everybody loves a happy ending!



Glad you got it worked out.
View Quote
Thanks!

 



BTW, he noticed something that is probably the reason I screwed myself, pun intended.    I was putting the short end of the Allen in the hole, so I was using the long end of the bar and putting a lot of torque on it.  Totally makes sense, but I hadn't stopped to think about that when I was doing it.  Even though it didn't feel like I was tightening the screws down a lot, I probably put more pressure on them.  
Link Posted: 7/2/2015 4:01:05 PM EDT
[#20]
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Thanks!  

BTW, he noticed something that is probably the reason I screwed myself, pun intended.    I was putting the short end of the Allen in the hole, so I was using the long end of the bar and putting a lot of torque on it.  Totally makes sense, but I hadn't stopped to think about that when I was doing it.  Even though it didn't feel like I was tightening the screws down a lot, I probably put more pressure on them.  
View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
Quoted:
Everybody loves a happy ending!

Glad you got it worked out.
Thanks!  

BTW, he noticed something that is probably the reason I screwed myself, pun intended.    I was putting the short end of the Allen in the hole, so I was using the long end of the bar and putting a lot of torque on it.  Totally makes sense, but I hadn't stopped to think about that when I was doing it.  Even though it didn't feel like I was tightening the screws down a lot, I probably put more pressure on them.  


I was in charge of the "mechanical" aspects of our electrical engineering senior design robot in college. It was built with an aluminum extruded modular framework that was held together with a lot of allen head cap screws. After I got back from a few days off (from being sick), my professor asked to see the allen wrench I had been using to tighten everything down with. He then went down to the mechanical enginnering machine shop and had them cut off the long end so it essentially had 2 short ends. He gave it back to me and told me I used too much force and no one could loosen anything in my absence to make adjustments.

Some of us just don't know our own strength, lol!
Link Posted: 7/2/2015 8:29:11 PM EDT
[#21]

Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:
I was in charge of the "mechanical" aspects of our electrical engineering senior design robot in college. It was built with an aluminum extruded modular framework that was held together with a lot of allen head cap screws. After I got back from a few days off (from being sick), my professor asked to see the allen wrench I had been using to tighten everything down with. He then went down to the mechanical enginnering machine shop and had them cut off the long end so it essentially had 2 short ends. He gave it back to me and told me I used too much force and no one could loosen anything in my absence to make adjustments.



Some of us just don't know our own strength, lol!

View Quote View All Quotes
View All Quotes
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Quoted:



Quoted:


Quoted:

Everybody loves a happy ending!



Glad you got it worked out.
Thanks!  



BTW, he noticed something that is probably the reason I screwed myself, pun intended.    I was putting the short end of the Allen in the hole, so I was using the long end of the bar and putting a lot of torque on it.  Totally makes sense, but I hadn't stopped to think about that when I was doing it.  Even though it didn't feel like I was tightening the screws down a lot, I probably put more pressure on them.  





I was in charge of the "mechanical" aspects of our electrical engineering senior design robot in college. It was built with an aluminum extruded modular framework that was held together with a lot of allen head cap screws. After I got back from a few days off (from being sick), my professor asked to see the allen wrench I had been using to tighten everything down with. He then went down to the mechanical enginnering machine shop and had them cut off the long end so it essentially had 2 short ends. He gave it back to me and told me I used too much force and no one could loosen anything in my absence to make adjustments.



Some of us just don't know our own strength, lol!





 
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