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10/20/2017 1:01:18 AM
9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/28/2005 2:01:11 PM EDT
I posted a thread a long time about this but I've forgotten all I need to do. I think that I need to replace the gas nut so the oprod doesn't bend due to the heavier loads, but I could be wrong....

Link Posted: 8/28/2005 3:10:19 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 8/28/2005 3:10:59 PM EDT by 1911builder]
I would not shoot any loads heavier than a commercial 150 SP load. If handloads use 150 grain bullets with Hodgon or IMR 4895 powder, or, a powder with an equivalent burning rate. Heavier bullets than 150 grains and slower burning powders increase the chances of bending your op rod.
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 3:41:07 PM EDT
adjustable gas plugs can do some to offset the slower burning powders and more powerful loads of hunting ammo. I've heard, but not verified that heavy projectiles still are a factor...
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 6:02:17 PM EDT
The gas system of the M1 rifle is designed to operate within a specific pressure curve. Stick with M2 spec loads. Stay away from heavy hunting loads or high pressure loads such as "light Magnums".
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 9:20:58 PM EDT

Originally Posted By 1911builder:
I would not shoot any loads heavier than a commercial 150 SP load. If handloads use 150 grain bullets with Hodgon or IMR 4895 powder, or, a powder with an equivalent burning rate. Heavier bullets than 150 grains and slower burning powders increase the chances of bending your op rod.



Who told you that crap? You can shoot loads heavier then 150 grs is an M1 without fear or damaging your rifle. For example, AP ammo, used almost exclusively in combat in WWII and Korea, used 163 gr bullets. Match ammo used a 173 gr bullet. Anyone who shoots the garand in matches use 168 or 155 gr bullets, depending on conditions they shoot in and what their rifle likes.

All you have to do is stay with a bullet under 180 grs and powder no slower then IMR 4064 and you'll be fine. Any commerical ammo suitable for hunting is most likely unsafe to fire even if it has a bullet of 150 grs.

Just buy a ajustable gas plug then you can vent the excess gases and you don;t have to worry about all this.
Link Posted: 8/28/2005 9:43:57 PM EDT
Load your own, it is really the only way to be sure, and always stick to loads under 180 grs bullets.


I use 47 grs of 4895 under my 150 gr bullets....



Some people will also say that softpoints are bad (claim the lead gets shaved and builds up, not a problem for hunting unless you shoot alot at deer and the like and never clean your rifle....)

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