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1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 7/13/2002 1:55:22 PM EST
Today I only fired guns in single action. SIG 226 and 220, S&W 945, Glock 19, 17, 21(Yes the Glock can be considered single action even if the trigger pull is heavy). Now: what's the advantage of single action over double? I don't really prefer the lighter trigger pull over the double action. It makes no difference to me. Does double action have a distinct breaking point, the moment just before you have pulled the trigger enough to fire off a round? Answers please...

Doggonit (SIG LOVE!)

BTW: My dad would say: (if he would say this) 945 LOVE!
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 2:02:33 PM EST
One major advantage that DA has over SA, is second strike capability. Now, if the FTF is because of a dud round, or dud primer, you'll have to cycle the action anyway to clear it (same for both DA and SA). But if it's because of a hard primer (or something similar) then DA has the advantage of just another trigger pull.

Other than that, I really don't see any difference (except the length and weight of the trigger pull). I like both.

-Gloftoe
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 2:14:23 PM EST
Consistant Trigger Pull=Accuracy

Also if the round misfires on the first pull dont waste time trying to set it off again. TAP, RACK, BANG!
Link Posted: 7/13/2002 8:35:56 PM EST

Originally Posted By Doggonit:
Today I only fired guns in single action. SIG 226 and 220, S&W 945, Glock 19, 17, 21(Yes the Glock can be considered single action even if the trigger pull is heavy).

Now: what's the advantage of single action over double? I don't really prefer the lighter trigger pull over the double action. It makes no difference to me. Does double action have a distinct breaking pointAnswers please...



Where to begin...

First of all, Glocks ARE NOT single-action guns. They are Double-Action-Only (DAO) pistols. Therefore, they could be said to be "single mode of action" but NOT single-action (SA). Conversely, a Sig 226 is usually a dual-mode pistol...that is, the first shot is double-action (DA) and the following shots are single-action.

What distinguishes between DA and SA is that the trigger cocks the hammer in a DA pistol...therefore, a Glock is DA. SA pistols require that the hammer be cocked by a means other than pulling on the trigger (i.e. your thumb or racking the slide back) and the trigger simply releases the hammer. An example of this would be the 1911 pistols, Browning Hi-Powers, or even the old Colt Single-Action Army revolvers (what you saw in the Western movies when they "fanned" the hammer).

The advantage SA has over DA is that the trigger pull is USUALLY lighter, but ALWAYS SHORTER (significantly, I might add). Also, because of the shorter trigger pull, there is less "wiggling" of the gun on target by the average shooter. SA's other advantage would be the common/required use of hammer safeties which might confuse an untrained assailant who disarms you and wants to use your gun on you...3-12 seconds might save your life.

DA's advantage AND disadvantage is that is simple and intuitive. The disadvantage being that any idiot/assailant can pick it up and squeeze and will go bang.

Above all else, if you are not familiar with handguns and/or do not train/shoot often...you should stick to a single-mode of action for the sake of consistency. Therefore, a DA or SA will be fine. Dual-mode pistols add a bit of complexity that is best left for more experienced shooters (in a self-defense situation).

That's my two cents. Make change if you have to. Hope this helps.
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