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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/26/2002 9:09:16 PM EDT
I have my eyes on a Remington 1100 synthetic 12 gauge for a semi-auto shotgun. I want it for trap shooting and would prefer a semi for the reduced recoil. Is it any good?
Link Posted: 8/26/2002 10:21:48 PM EDT
Well, they've sold about a gazillion of them since it's inception so they must not be too bad. >gg< Of course they've now gone to the 11-87 model, the newer generation.

Those that shoot skeet & nothing else tell me that Beretta or Benelli is the way to go. Beretta has the 390 that should be in the 1100's price range. I have a Beretta O&U 686 that I really love.
Link Posted: 8/26/2002 10:28:55 PM EDT
I have an 1100 and love it!

Killed everythign from deer to birds with it, and several clays.

get one..you will like it

medcop
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 5:30:32 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Section_Leader:
I have my eyes on a Remington 1100 synthetic 12 gauge for a semi-auto shotgun. I want it for trap shooting and would prefer a semi for the reduced recoil. Is it any good?



Based on my experiences on the trap fields I would suggest that if you are going to shoot quite a bit of trap with an 1100 I would buy a spare parts kit similar to what is offered in Shotgun Sports magazine.

IMHO, if you plan on shooting a lot I would suggest a Browning BT99 or another break action type.

If you only plan on shooting limited quantities of clays then an 1100 should provide adequate service.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 6:58:56 AM EDT
Trapshooters who love their Remington's 1100 and 1187s say buy extra parts, I think its some kind of spring that fails most frequently. The positive side is the parts are cheap and easy to replace, some who shoot quite a bit of trap have them replaced once a year to minimize a failure in the middle of a round or tournament. I have heard several people who shoot trap with Remington's still able to put 20k through their trap guns before any kind of parts failure if that gives you an idea of how reliable they are. I shoot a Citori, so I can only tell you what I have seen playing trap with those who own Remington's.

If you like it, buy it, its a good shotgun that won't beat you death after several rounds of trap.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 9:37:46 AM EDT
Brownell's sells the parts that frequently fail. I think they even offer a "field repair kit."

Personally I think that you'd be better off with a Benelli or a Beretta.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 10:02:29 AM EDT
Been running an 1100 for close to 15 years without a problem. One of Remingtons better inventions. Benelli or Beretta don't work any better and cost more to boot.

Link Posted: 8/27/2002 11:05:22 AM EDT
Looked at a Browning Gold????
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 11:33:04 AM EDT

Originally Posted By P226:
Trapshooters who love their Remington's 1100 and 1187s say buy extra parts, I think its some kind of spring that fails most frequently. The positive side is the parts are cheap and easy to replace, some who shoot quite a bit of trap have them replaced once a year to minimize a failure in the middle of a round or tournament. I have heard several people who shoot trap with Remington's still able to put 20k through their trap guns before any kind of parts failure if that gives you an idea of how reliable they are. I shoot a Citori, so I can only tell you what I have seen playing trap with those who own Remington's.

If you like it, buy it, its a good shotgun that won't beat you death after several rounds of trap.



O RINGS!!!!! That's my one bitch about my 1100 and 11-87. You have to have some of those damn O rings with you all the time. They're rubber rings that provide the seal for the barrel gasses to make it down to operate the action. If one of those goes in the middle of a hunt or something, you have yourself a bulky single-shot shotgun.

On the plus side, the O rings ARE cheap, and don't take up too much room in your pocket.

-Gloftoe
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 11:49:14 AM EDT
My favorite autoloading shotguns. I have two 1100s, both of them older models with wood stocks. One is a Bicentennial Trap (1976) with a 30" full choke barrel and Monte Carlo stock. The other does double duty as a skeet gun and a field gun, by swapping out barrels between a 26" skeet choke target bead barrel and a 28" vent rib modified choke barrel.

The only part I've ever had to change is the rubber O-ring, and I keep spares on hand.

I bookmarked this reprint from Shotgun Sports magazine posted on FreeRepublic.com last year:
The Legendary Remington 1100

The picture links are broken now but the article is intact.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 3:43:29 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Big_Bear:
My favorite autoloading shotguns. I bookmarked this reprint from Shotgun Sports magazine posted on FreeRepublic.com last year:
The Legendary Remington 1100



Thanks for the link to the article. It was good reading and informative.

M4-AK
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 3:45:49 PM EDT
My wife has an 1100 youth in 20. It is a well balanced light, fairly well fitting gun.
It also took 100 rounds break-in before it would feed okay for me, and 300 for her.
Link Posted: 8/27/2002 5:24:45 PM EDT
Thanks for the article. Really informative, and just an over all good read.
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