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Posted: 2/13/2009 6:20:56 AM EDT
Does anyone reload for glocks here? If so, is there anything i have to do different compared to any other make? I have heard alot of story's about KB's and that once fired cases will buldge. Will resizing take care of this. Any other tips or concerns are appreciated.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 6:23:20 AM EDT
Polygonal rifling does not like lead bullets much. People have has luck with them , but its easier to use jacketed or plated bullets.

Case bulge is a factor in the .40 S&W caliber mostly. Resizing does not take care of it because the brass is weakened in that area.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 6:27:53 AM EDT
Originally Posted By ANGST:
Polygonal rifling does not like lead bullets much. People have has luck with them , but its easier to use jacketed or plated bullets.

Case bulge is a factor in the .40 S&W caliber mostly. Resizing does not take care of it because the brass is weakened in that area.


Redding now makes a "Push-Through" die that helps with the "Glock-Bulge" Check their site.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 7:03:29 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/13/2009 9:52:19 AM EDT by Erik_O]
Originally Posted By j1r11:
Does anyone reload for glocks here? If so, is there anything i have to do different compared to any other make? I have heard alot of story's about KB's and that once fired cases will buldge. Will resizing take care of this. Any other tips or concerns are appreciated.


Yes, I shoot handloaded .45 ACP out of a Glock 30 and it has yet to Kb! on me. I use once fired brass ( mostly S&B that I shot out of the same pistol when it was cheap ) and use a Dillon 550B press with Dillon dies and a light crimp die whose manufacturer escapes me. My other components are Winchester 231, Winchester Large Pistol primers and Rainer copper plated bullets ( 185 and 230 grains ). Sadly, my cache is dwindling and it looks like my resupply will cost me much more than the last batch.

The Kb! stories seem to center around high pressure loads ( .40 S&W for instance ) with outliers occurring in other calibers. I personally have experienced what at first I thought was a Kb! in .45 ACP using factory reloaded ammo, but I have come to believe it was actually a double charge and not a Kb!

I am not an expert in hand loading by any means, I'm merely relating my experience to date.

The only real difficulty I have had with hand loaded rounds in my Glock has been reliability. My first objective when I began reloading was to make safe ammo. Once I proved to myself that I could do that, my goal became to make "economical" rounds. Unfortunately, after you buy your components the only real variable you can adjust is the powder throw to eek out a keg longer. So I tried reducing my powder load to find where the pistol would still operate. It turns out that this was not a good idea for at least one ( and probably more ) reason: reliability became a big issue. The reduced powder load removed energy available to work the slide and resulted in lots of light primer strikes. Of course my first diagnosis of the problem was "hard primers" or "worn out springs", but experiments with other primers and replaced internal components still resulted in light primer strikes. Once I increased my powder throw, the pistol began to function flawlessly again ( as it did with factory ammo ).

This observation is probably true for all other brands of pistols but I happened to make it while loading for my Glock.

If you plan on shooting non-plated bullets, I would recommend finding an aftermarket replacement barrel to avoid the whole leading issue altogether. Otherwise, follow the manuals, examine your brass closely, ask lots of questions and you ought to be fine.

Edit: Grammer, spelling
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 8:05:40 AM EDT
I would be reloading 9mm or .45, but this seems kind of irritating as i have heard this only happening with Glock.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 8:18:56 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/13/2009 8:19:22 AM EDT by innocent_bystander]
Originally Posted By bfoosh06:
Redding now makes a "Push-Through" die that helps with the "Glock-Bulge" Check their site.


Interesting.

http://www.redding-reloading.com/pages/grxpushthru.html

I reload for my 9mm Glocks. On my 550 I use an EGW "U" sizing die in station one and a Lee factory crimp die in station 4. This guarantees that everything will chamber. Bullet runout with this die combo and using Montana Gold 124 grain FMJs is only .002!!!
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 9:31:56 AM EDT
Thanks for the link.

Learned someting NEW today.

Aloha, Mark
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 9:36:51 AM EDT
I reload for my Glock 23. The stories you hear about the Glock bulge and Glock KBs seem to involve early Glocks (Gen I model) mostly in .40. I have never found a bulge in any round I have fired from my pistol (Gen 3), factory or reload. The ramp cut in the barrel to improve feeding left some of the case unsupported, and if firing a 'hot' load, could cause failures. High pressure pistol rounds like 9mm and .40 are somewhat unforgiving when it comes to ammo. Pressures in those can be in 35,000 psi range, while the 45ACP is less than 20,000.

That said, when I reload for my 23, I use plated or jacketed bullets, and I keep the loads on the light side of midscale, in the 900 - 1000 fps area. I've never had a problem.

As long as you use safe reloading practices (safe published load data, verify that you are using the correct powder for the load, inspect each round after dropping powder for double charges, etc.) you can safely reload for Glocks or any pistol.

My .02.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 9:50:39 AM EDT
Originally Posted By j1r11:
I would be reloading 9mm or .45, but this seems kind of irritating as i have heard this only happening with Glock.


As I understand it, any firearm can Kb! but incidents with Glocks are more commonly reported. I have never been inclined to handload 9mm ( those bullets are tiny! ) but keep to the published data and you should be good to go.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 10:16:40 AM EDT
Originally Posted By innocent_bystander:
Originally Posted By bfoosh06:
Redding now makes a "Push-Through" die that helps with the "Glock-Bulge" Check their site.


Interesting.

http://www.redding-reloading.com/pages/grxpushthru.html

I reload for my 9mm Glocks. On my 550 I use an EGW "U" sizing die in station one and a Lee factory crimp die in station 4. This guarantees that everything will chamber. Bullet runout with this die combo and using Montana Gold 124 grain FMJs is only .002!!!

Where can i find that "EGW die"

Link Posted: 2/13/2009 10:35:50 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/13/2009 10:37:49 AM EDT by Glock23NC]
I use Montana Gold Bullets 180gr FMC with either Titegroup or Power Pistol. WSP Primers. I use once fired brass frequently and never get the "bulge". I resize, but I do not crimp.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 10:52:36 AM EDT
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 3:52:05 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TimpAR:
I reload for my Glock 23. The stories you hear about the Glock bulge and Glock KBs seem to involve early Glocks (Gen I model) mostly in .40. I have never found a bulge in any round I have fired from my pistol (Gen 3), factory or reload. The ramp cut in the barrel to improve feeding left some of the case unsupported, and if firing a 'hot' load, could cause failures. High pressure pistol rounds like 9mm and .40 are somewhat unforgiving when it comes to ammo. Pressures in those can be in 35,000 psi range, while the 45ACP is less than 20,000.

That said, when I reload for my 23, I use plated or jacketed bullets, and I keep the loads on the light side of midscale, in the 900 - 1000 fps area. I've never had a problem.

As long as you use safe reloading practices (safe published load data, verify that you are using the correct powder for the load, inspect each round after dropping powder for double charges, etc.) you can safely reload for Glocks or any pistol.

My .02.


+1 Everything I would have said!
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 4:06:41 PM EDT
I have been reloading for a Glock 35 40 S&W (as well as for a Sig P226 40 S&W) for a couple of years and have never experienced the "Glock Bulge." I have looked closely and even measured to see if it was there. Can't find it on my brass. Only thing I can believe is that it is due to earlier Glocks and hot loads.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 6:26:59 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/13/2009 6:28:39 PM EDT by blake-b]
Originally Posted By Erik_O:
Originally Posted By j1r11:
Does anyone reload for glocks here? If so, is there anything i have to do different compared to any other make? I have heard alot of story's about KB's and that once fired cases will buldge. Will resizing take care of this. Any other tips or concerns are appreciated.


Yes, I shoot handloaded .45 ACP out of a Glock 30 and it has yet to Kb! on me. I use once fired brass ( mostly S&B that I shot out of the same pistol when it was cheap ) and use a Dillon 550B press with Dillon dies and a light crimp die whose manufacturer escapes me. My other components are Winchester 231, Winchester Large Pistol primers and Rainer copper plated bullets ( 185 and 230 grains ). Sadly, my cache is dwindling and it looks like my resupply will cost me much more than the last batch.

The Kb! stories seem to center around high pressure loads ( .40 S&W for instance )
with outliers occurring in other calibers. I personally have experienced what at first I thought was a Kb! in .45 ACP using factory reloaded ammo, but I have come to believe it was actually a double charge and not a Kb!

I am not an expert in hand loading by any means, I'm merely relating my experience to date.

The only real difficulty I have had with hand loaded rounds in my Glock has been reliability. My first objective when I began reloading was to make safe ammo. Once I proved to myself that I could do that, my goal became to make "economical" rounds. Unfortunately, after you buy your components the only real variable you can adjust is the powder throw to eek out a keg longer. So I tried reducing my powder load to find where the pistol would still operate. It turns out that this was not a good idea for at least one ( and probably more ) reason: reliability became a big issue. The reduced powder load removed energy available to work the slide and resulted in lots of light primer strikes. Of course my first diagnosis of the problem was "hard primers" or "worn out springs", but experiments with other primers and replaced internal components still resulted in light primer strikes. Once I increased my powder throw, the pistol began to function flawlessly again ( as it did with factory ammo ).

This observation is probably true for all other brands of pistols but I happened to make it while loading for my Glock.

If you plan on shooting non-plated bullets, I would recommend finding an aftermarket replacement barrel to avoid the whole leading issue altogether. Otherwise, follow the manuals, examine your brass closely, ask lots of questions and you ought to be fine.

Edit: Grammer, spelling


I blew up my G22 today. It was completely stock with the exception of an 8# trigger (work mandatory). I was at the range and had put around 70 reloads through it. They were 180gr plated montana golds I believe, backed by 5.5gr WSF and WSP primers. I was doing double taps. First one went bang, the second went BOOM! The mag ejected, the grip plug flew out, and my hand felt like I had held a firecracker. The chamber was gone. The extractor was gone. The slide lock was gone and the trigger was cracked. The slide is bulged on the side and the part of the slide the touches the chamber on the top is slightly rolled up. I never found any chamber parts or the slide lock or extractor. I can only surmise I double charged a round. I use a Dillon 550B for loading.

This was my personally owned duty gun. On the bright side, If I can't get the slide assembly replaced at work, I'm going to buy a G22 RTF to replace this one. I will probably buy an aftermarket barrel to use for my handloads and switch them out as necessary. Although, I'm pretty sure it wouldn't have mattered today.

I'm only telling this story to remind all to be careful and pay attention so innocent firearms don't get hurt.

Link Posted: 2/13/2009 6:41:25 PM EDT
I reload for Glocks in 9mm, 40 S&W, and 45 ACP that we shoot in the local competitions. We shoot either Berry's or Rainers plated bullets loaded to mid-level published volicities using Power Pistol powder. No problems noted so far and we're on our 4th or 5th cycle with the brass.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 7:06:15 PM EDT
Sorry to hear about that blake-b. Sounds like a double charge. I hear now that if you contact Glock with a KB they tell you to send the firearm to HP White Laboratory for stress testing (an independent lab). In almost every case they find the pressures were in excess of 75,000 psi.

I too use WSF but iin 9mm. A double charge will spill powder. You might try finding a powder that is a bit slower and bulkier.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 7:42:01 PM EDT
Originally Posted By innocent_bystander:
Sorry to hear about that blake-b. Sounds like a double charge. I hear now that if you contact Glock with a KB they tell you to send the firearm to HP White Laboratory for stress testing (an independent lab). In almost every case they find the pressures were in excess of 75,000 psi.

I too use WSF but iin 9mm. A double charge will spill powder. You might try finding a powder that is a bit slower and bulkier.


I might do that. I'm not home now so I can't check, but will a double charge in a 40 do that? I was just thinking I'm glad a double charge in .223 spills over to let me know I messed up.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 7:50:40 PM EDT
I don't think 11 grains of WSF in a .40 will spill.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 8:11:46 PM EDT
Originally Posted By blake-b:
Originally Posted By Erik_O:
Originally Posted By j1r11:
Does anyone reload for glocks here? If so, is there anything i have to do different compared to any other make? I have heard alot of story's about KB's and that once fired cases will buldge. Will resizing take care of this. Any other tips or concerns are appreciated.


Yes, I shoot handloaded .45 ACP out of a Glock 30 and it has yet to Kb! on me. I use once fired brass ( mostly S&B that I shot out of the same pistol when it was cheap ) and use a Dillon 550B press with Dillon dies and a light crimp die whose manufacturer escapes me. My other components are Winchester 231, Winchester Large Pistol primers and Rainer copper plated bullets ( 185 and 230 grains ). Sadly, my cache is dwindling and it looks like my resupply will cost me much more than the last batch.

The Kb! stories seem to center around high pressure loads ( .40 S&W for instance )
with outliers occurring in other calibers. I personally have experienced what at first I thought was a Kb! in .45 ACP using factory reloaded ammo, but I have come to believe it was actually a double charge and not a Kb!

I am not an expert in hand loading by any means, I'm merely relating my experience to date.

The only real difficulty I have had with hand loaded rounds in my Glock has been reliability. My first objective when I began reloading was to make safe ammo. Once I proved to myself that I could do that, my goal became to make "economical" rounds. Unfortunately, after you buy your components the only real variable you can adjust is the powder throw to eek out a keg longer. So I tried reducing my powder load to find where the pistol would still operate. It turns out that this was not a good idea for at least one ( and probably more ) reason: reliability became a big issue. The reduced powder load removed energy available to work the slide and resulted in lots of light primer strikes. Of course my first diagnosis of the problem was "hard primers" or "worn out springs", but experiments with other primers and replaced internal components still resulted in light primer strikes. Once I increased my powder throw, the pistol began to function flawlessly again ( as it did with factory ammo ).

This observation is probably true for all other brands of pistols but I happened to make it while loading for my Glock.

If you plan on shooting non-plated bullets, I would recommend finding an aftermarket replacement barrel to avoid the whole leading issue altogether. Otherwise, follow the manuals, examine your brass closely, ask lots of questions and you ought to be fine.

Edit: Grammer, spelling


I blew up my G22 today. It was completely stock with the exception of an 8# trigger (work mandatory). I was at the range and had put around 70 reloads through it. They were 180gr plated montana golds I believe, backed by 5.5gr WSF and WSP primers. I was doing double taps. First one went bang, the second went BOOM! The mag ejected, the grip plug flew out, and my hand felt like I had held a firecracker. The chamber was gone. The extractor was gone. The slide lock was gone and the trigger was cracked. The slide is bulged on the side and the part of the slide the touches the chamber on the top is slightly rolled up. I never found any chamber parts or the slide lock or extractor. I can only surmise I double charged a round. I use a Dillon 550B for loading.

This was my personally owned duty gun. On the bright side, If I can't get the slide assembly replaced at work, I'm going to buy a G22 RTF to replace this one. I will probably buy an aftermarket barrel to use for my handloads and switch them out as necessary. Although, I'm pretty sure it wouldn't have mattered today.

I'm only telling this story to remind all to be careful and pay attention so innocent firearms don't get hurt.



Glad to hear your OK and for manning up that it was your own doing. If the earlier poster was correct (75,000) PSI on a double charge, then I don't see how any autoloader would survive. Heck I don't know of any handguns besides probably the Ruger Superredhawks and Freedom Arms revolvers that can take that kind of pressure!

Link Posted: 2/13/2009 9:39:30 PM EDT
I have reloaded for the G17, G21C, and the G27. I load cast lead for the G21C but I have changed out the barrel to a KKM matchgrade. So far I have never had an issue with any of them. I keep my loads down close to start grain and work up just enough to function the gun.
Link Posted: 2/13/2009 9:48:58 PM EDT
voids the warranty!
Link Posted: 2/14/2009 2:11:34 AM EDT
Back in 1995 I was reloading my gen 1 G23 with regular nonplated bullets and after several hundred rounds the pistol would double fire at times.
I sent the gun back to Glock with a note explaining the problem without mentioning the reloads. They fixed it for free and sent me a note back with it saying Stop shooting reloads.
Link Posted: 2/14/2009 3:30:29 AM EDT
People like to talk all kinds of shit about Glocks and how they are KB prone. Fact is 90% of all KB's in Glocks occur while using reloads, lead bullets, or both. Questions like this one make me wonder if people read the manual. It tells you in their not to use these types of ammo. So I would just look for deals on factory ammo instead of reloading. It does cost a little more but the way I see it is it is worth it over reloading. All the money you will save reloading will not be enough to replace your gun when all the lead buildup causes a KB or when that "Hot" round that was just a little to "Hot" gets fired and results in a KB. Just my .02 though, YMMV and all that other stuff.
Link Posted: 2/14/2009 4:23:43 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/14/2009 4:25:23 AM EDT by abpt1]
I had a G23 KB on me with factory loads in 1996 I had to use a lee FL case die to get them back in shape..or that would not chamber in my 4006 or my 4013 ...after that I started reloading because i thought it must have been overdose of powder so....I got another G23 and and a G17 both have shot thousands of Hard cast reloads ..BUT my had casted bullets are around 26+BNH most hard cast or lead you guys will find on the market will be around 16+/-BNH ......
Link Posted: 2/14/2009 4:26:47 AM EDT
Originally Posted By innocent_bystander:
I don't think 11 grains of WSF in a .40 will spill.


nope ....
Link Posted: 2/14/2009 4:26:52 AM EDT
Originally Posted By nmguy23:
voids the warranty!


So what. I've never needed to use the warranty.

Link Posted: 2/14/2009 4:32:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By nmguy23:
People like to talk all kinds of shit about Glocks and how they are KB prone. Fact is 90% of all KB's in Glocks occur while using reloads, lead bullets, or both. Questions like this one make me wonder if people read the manual. It tells you in their not to use these types of ammo. So I would just look for deals on factory ammo instead of reloading. It does cost a little more but the way I see it is it is worth it over reloading. All the money you will save reloading will not be enough to replace your gun when all the lead buildup causes a KB or when that "Hot" round that was just a little to "Hot" gets fired and results in a KB. Just my .02 though, YMMV and all that other stuff.


I have shot lots of lead through my G21 and it worked great. I did change the barrel out to one designed for lead and since then I have shot a mountain of lead ammo through it. I cannot justify buying facotry ammo when you can cast and reload for pennies!! The money I have saved on ammo I could have bought 2 glocks!!!!!

Link Posted: 2/14/2009 2:21:17 PM EDT
Originally Posted By nmguy23:
People like to talk all kinds of shit about Glocks and how they are KB prone. Fact is 90% of all KB's in Glocks occur while using reloads, lead bullets, or both. Questions like this one make me wonder if people read the manual. It tells you in their not to use these types of ammo. So I would just look for deals on factory ammo instead of reloading. It does cost a little more but the way I see it is it is worth it over reloading. All the money you will save reloading will not be enough to replace your gun when all the lead buildup causes a KB or when that "Hot" round that was just a little to "Hot" gets fired and results in a KB. Just my .02 though, YMMV and all that other stuff.


WHAT?!

The money I saved reloading for my 10mm(Glock 20) alone paid for ALL of my reloading equipment and my Glock 27.... and now that I do the math, enough money left over for a couple more Glocks and a trip to the doctor if one kbs.
My reloads cost $.10 each max, $.06 if I use my cast bullets, when factory ammo at its' cheapest is about $.40.

Number of reloads over the last 11 years through my Glock 20 = 15k(at least)........15000 x .10= $1500....... factory ammo at $.40 x 15000= $6000... that is a $4500 dollar savings now how in the hell is that not worth it?

Manuals say to use factory ammo for liability purposes, the guns are designed for SAAMI spec ammo and they(ALL GUN MANUFACTURERS) have no control the ammo some guy is reloading himself.
Link Posted: 2/14/2009 3:33:05 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/16/2009 5:15:48 AM EDT by FriscoPete]
I shot over 1000 reloads thru my Gen I Glock G22 without issue, but now have the latest Generation 3 G22. The chamber is more supported in the newer ones alright, but my cases were never too bulged from the Gen I. However I now have a Wilson Combat match barrel in it so I can shoot any .40 lead or jacketed without worry.

There were also some reports about AA#5 being a culprit in a disproportionate number of Glock 40 KBs. It has been sourced from several countries, and that may have been an issue.
Link Posted: 2/14/2009 6:24:05 PM EDT
I reload for my Glocks, .40 and 9mm.

No problems to speak of.

It is not a problem. Adhere to published data, use good brass, etc. etc.
Link Posted: 2/14/2009 7:29:16 PM EDT
Originally Posted By bfoosh06:
Originally Posted By ANGST:
Polygonal rifling does not like lead bullets much. People have has luck with them , but its easier to use jacketed or plated bullets.

Case bulge is a factor in the .40 S&W caliber mostly. Resizing does not take care of it because the brass is weakened in that area.


Redding now makes a "Push-Through" die that helps with the "Glock-Bulge" Check their site.


Just for the 40SW

Link Posted: 2/14/2009 7:33:06 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 2/14/2009 7:33:59 PM EDT by rn22723]
Google Evolution Gun Works and you can get U die from them
Link Posted: 2/14/2009 10:27:20 PM EDT
I use standard RCBS Carbide dies. Never had a problem getting out the "Glock bulge", even in .40.
Link Posted: 2/15/2009 7:57:00 AM EDT
Originally Posted By nmguy23:
People like to talk all kinds of shit about Glocks and how they are KB prone. Fact is 90% of all KB's in Glocks occur while using reloads, lead bullets, or both. Questions like this one make me wonder if people read the manual. It tells you in their not to use these types of ammo. So I would just look for deals on factory ammo instead of reloading. It does cost a little more but the way I see it is it is worth it over reloading. All the money you will save reloading will not be enough to replace your gun when all the lead buildup causes a KB or when that "Hot" round that was just a little to "Hot" gets fired and results in a KB. Just my .02 though, YMMV and all that other stuff.


I agree with what you are saying but I just went and looked through some of my various manuals for different firearms. They all say dont use reloads or they say use factory ammunition only. I guess this is just so they can cover there butt.
Link Posted: 2/15/2009 10:57:47 AM EDT
Just out of curiousity, how do you tell what generation your Glock is? I bought my 17 when the Democrats were going nuts about the 'plastic' gun that could go through metal detectors.

I've put 1,000s of reloads through it using jacketed, never lead or plated bullets, and have not had a problem.
Link Posted: 2/15/2009 7:42:35 PM EDT
Originally Posted By TripletDad:
Just out of curiousity, how do you tell what generation your Glock is? I bought my 17 when the Democrats were going nuts about the 'plastic' gun that could go through metal detectors.

I've put 1,000s of reloads through it using jacketed, never lead or plated bullets, and have not had a problem.


Gen 1 - Grip stippled all around.
Gen 2 - Grip checkered front and back.
Gen 3 - Grip has finger grooves and light rails (compact and full size frames)

Glock Generations
Link Posted: 2/15/2009 7:54:30 PM EDT
Originally Posted By blake-b:
Gen 1 - Grip stippled all around.
Gen 2 - Grip checkered front and back.
Gen 3 - Grip has finger grooves and light rails (compact and full size frames)
Glock Generations

That the only difference - the grip style and rails on the gen 3s? I was afraid they'd changed the safeties, added new ones, etc. I poke around a bit on the link you gave me, but could only find the picture you posted.
Link Posted: 2/15/2009 8:13:00 PM EDT
Originally Posted By blake-b:
I blew up my G22 today. It was completely stock with the exception of an 8# trigger (work mandatory). I was at the range and had put around 70 reloads through it. They were 180gr plated montana golds I believe, backed by 5.5gr WSF and WSP primers. I was doing double taps. First one went bang, the second went BOOM! The mag ejected, the grip plug flew out, and my hand felt like I had held a firecracker. The chamber was gone. The extractor was gone. The slide lock was gone and the trigger was cracked. The slide is bulged on the side and the part of the slide the touches the chamber on the top is slightly rolled up. I never found any chamber parts or the slide lock or extractor. I can only surmise I double charged a round. I use a Dillon 550B for loading.

This was my personally owned duty gun. On the bright side, If I can't get the slide assembly replaced at work, I'm going to buy a G22 RTF to replace this one. I will probably buy an aftermarket barrel to use for my handloads and switch them out as necessary. Although, I'm pretty sure it wouldn't have mattered today.

I'm only telling this story to remind all to be careful and pay attention so innocent firearms don't get hurt.



Woof.

Glad you've still got all your fingers! That sounds pretty much like my experience ( albeit I was firing .45 ACP ). There was a much louder boom, my hand stung and a my magazine blown out the bottom. The magazine release bar shot out between my trigger and index finger ( broken ) and the magazine floor plate was done for. Broke all of $6 in parts. The offending round was blown out all around the webbing, more pronounced at the six o'clock position ( it is unsupported there after all ). Thanks for relating your experience, you should post some pictures
Link Posted: 2/15/2009 8:46:36 PM EDT
I will when I get home. I'm out of town (where it occurred). I was either thinking of mounting it to a plaque and hanging it above my reloading bench to remind me to pay attention or, if possible, get the old slide assembly off and put a new one and a trigger back to restore it to functioning status. I'm still going to buy a new one for duty use because this one may have damage that can't be seen with the naked eye and I don't want to trust my life to it. I handled one of the RTF G22s today and I really liked it. I'm calling in the morning about buying one.
Link Posted: 2/15/2009 9:01:58 PM EDT
Sorry to hear about that experience, blake-b.

Obviously, and I'm sure you'd agree, a double-charged load would do that in just about any gun.

What's sad is that there have been cases of factory ammo doing this also, bein' double-charged, that is.
Link Posted: 2/16/2009 7:28:01 AM EDT
Originally Posted By blake-b:
Originally Posted By innocent_bystander:
Sorry to hear about that blake-b. Sounds like a double charge. I hear now that if you contact Glock with a KB they tell you to send the firearm to HP White Laboratory for stress testing (an independent lab). In almost every case they find the pressures were in excess of 75,000 psi.

I too use WSF but iin 9mm. A double charge will spill powder. You might try finding a powder that is a bit slower and bulkier.


I might do that. I'm not home now so I can't check, but will a double charge in a 40 do that? I was just thinking I'm glad a double charge in .223 spills over to let me know I messed up.


Glad you're alright.

One of the key things to remember when reloading to pick a powder that will spill should you accidentally double charge the case. WSF is pretty dense, and I can stuff 5.2 grains into a 9mm case without compressing it when I seat the bullet.

I also think this is one of the issues with .40 - double charges are easy to miss with more powder combination than many other calibers.
Link Posted: 2/16/2009 7:29:14 AM EDT
Originally Posted By nmguy23:
People like to talk all kinds of shit about Glocks and how they are KB prone. Fact is 90% of all KB's in Glocks occur while using reloads, lead bullets, or both. Questions like this one make me wonder if people read the manual. It tells you in their not to use these types of ammo. So I would just look for deals on factory ammo instead of reloading. It does cost a little more but the way I see it is it is worth it over reloading. All the money you will save reloading will not be enough to replace your gun when all the lead buildup causes a KB or when that "Hot" round that was just a little to "Hot" gets fired and results in a KB. Just my .02 though, YMMV and all that other stuff.


What are you doing in a reloading forum then? All manufacturers say not to use reloaded ammunition.

Don't go postal. Just a question.
Link Posted: 2/16/2009 11:09:07 AM EDT

Originally Posted By nmguy23:
So I would just look for deals on factory ammo instead of reloading. It does cost a little more but the way I see it is it is worth it over reloading.


Reloaded ammo is no different than factory ammo IF you take your time and check each load. This is why I'm so hesitant to buy a progressive machine. When you start giving up quality for speed, your potential for problems increases greatly. I'll stick to my single stage press, which is much cheaper than any progressive AND gives me a chance to inspect each round. No I won't be cranking our 1000 rounds in an hour, but my gun won't explode either.
Link Posted: 2/16/2009 1:09:58 PM EDT
Originally Posted By dneal33:
Back in 1995 I was reloading my gen 1 G23 with regular nonplated bullets and after several hundred rounds the pistol would double fire at times.
I sent the gun back to Glock with a note explaining the problem without mentioning the reloads. They fixed it for free and sent me a note back with it saying Stop shooting reloads.


That's funny Sh$#!
Link Posted: 2/16/2009 1:16:15 PM EDT
KB's are a way for a gun to tell you "Youre an idiot!"

1. The safest thing to do is to use new brass, but that gets kinda expensive.
2. Brass becomes more prone to failure with every firing. Logic dictates you should not shoot full house loads out of well used brass, or brass you find at the range.
3. Double charges tend to raise pressures to unsafe levels, so pay attention!
4. Bullet setback also tends to raise pressures to unsafe levels. So pay attention!
5. "Fixing" defective rounds with the Lee FCD tends to lead to KB's. You cannot fix a defective round. A defective round is a warning. Take it apart and start over.
6. Keep your Glock clean. Glocks can fire out of battery. Firing out of battery leads to KB's, especially with unsupported chambers.
7. Understand how a pistol works before handloading for one:

- When a pistol fires a correctly assembled round, the slide and barrel remain locked together for the first 1/8" of rearward travel. This is called dwell time. This is where the pressure rises, falls, bullet comes out, case swells to seal the chamber, etc. Fuck with the dwell time and the KB genie comes out.

- A bad round, dirty gun, weak recoil spring, etc. prevents the slide from going fully into battery. If a pistol fires without being fully in battery, the dwell time is cut short or eliminated alltogether. The gun unlocks when the pressure is still high, the case is pulled out by the extractor, it loses all chamber support and ruptures.

- When assembling rounds, use your chamber as a gauge, not an aftermarket case gauge. Only your chamber knows how big it is, how bigh the throat is, what OAL or bullet diameter it will accept. Rounds must fall in and drop out easily.



See where the arrow is pointing? That is the throat area of the chamber. All chambers, both rifle and pistol, have throats. Some chambers have longer throats than others. Some have tighter throats than others. Did you know that some pistols will not accept standard commercial cast sizes, like .452" for example. Do you know what happens when you try to drop such a round into such a chamber? That's right, it won't chamber. The throat won't let it. What do you think will happen when the slide tries to go into battery with such a round in the way? Do you think a Lee FCD can fix this? It can't.

This is just the surface of the pool of variables related to handloading.

Link Posted: 2/21/2009 12:26:55 PM EDT
someone mentioned there is some upgrade or preventive maintinance to do to gen. 2 19's, anyone know what that might be?
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 6:32:31 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 3/29/2009 6:32:43 AM EDT by j1r11]
Well, i finally handloaded some rounds for my G19 and wore my helmet and frag vest and was dissapointed. The darn thing fed, functioned perfect and actually was accurate. I was expecting the infamous fireworks show. My empty brass even was "buldgeless". Aren't these thing supposed to blow up.
Link Posted: 3/29/2009 11:08:11 AM EDT
Originally Posted By j1r11:
Well, i finally handloaded some rounds for my G19 and wore my helmet and frag vest and was dissapointed. The darn thing fed, functioned perfect and actually was accurate. I was expecting the infamous fireworks show. My empty brass even was "buldgeless". Aren't these thing supposed to blow up.


I hate to burst your bubble j1r11 but you ain't gonna ever see those fireworks or kabooms or ruined brass by shooting your reloads in your Glock. I have tried to blow up 3 Glocks to date with shooting reloaded ammo through them and haven't done it yet. I'll keep reloading and will keep trying it. If I ever do I will be sure to let you know!


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