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Posted: 10/27/2013 3:56:43 PM EST
I made a pretty decent score at an estate sale today - I got about 150 pounds of cast bullets in .38, .45, 9mm, and a few others.

1. Most of these are .38 and weigh anywhere from 158 - 161 grains. Is this fluctuation acceptable for plinking to cast bullet reloaders? Can the variations be due to the lube/wax on the bullets?

2. Most of these bullets are old, and some have some of them have some oxidation on them, some members of a FB page I'm on said to melt them and recast (I don't have any way to do this though). Are there any other options? Can I tumble them?

3. What would be the best way to resell all of these? By the pound? By 100 counts?

4. Also, I got a bunch of old surplus 30/06 brass, there is some DEN 42, WRA, LC 37 and other headstamps - is this stuff worth anything? If so, how much should I ask?

5. Additionally I bought about 70 M1 clips, many of them are rusty (surface rust). Are they worth anything in this condition?

Thanks,

Mark
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:27:43 PM EST
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 5:39:12 PM EST
1. Weight fluctuations could be due to the alloy used. Different alloys can weight slightly less or more. Lube could cause slight weight differences as well.

2. Oxidation won't matter. Shoot as is.

3. Sell what's comfortable for you. I personally wouldn't want to count out lots of 100 each. If you're gonna sell by weight, I'd suggest getting a decent scale. Bathroom scale might make some people unhappy when they get 9.2 lbs of bullets and ordered 10.

4-5. Can't help, sorry.
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:14:58 PM EST
Originally Posted By 2mjohns:
I made a pretty decent score at an estate sale today - I got about 150 pounds of cast bullets in .38, .45, 9mm, and a few others.

1. Most of these are .38 and weigh anywhere from 158 - 161 grains. Is this fluctuation acceptable for plinking to cast bullet reloaders? Can the variations be due to the lube/wax on the bullets?

2. Most of these bullets are old, and some have some of them have some oxidation on them, some members of a FB page I'm on said to melt them and recast (I don't have any way to do this though). Are there any other options? Can I tumble them?

3. What would be the best way to resell all of these? By the pound? By 100 counts?

4. Also, I got a bunch of old surplus 30/06 brass, there is some DEN 42, WRA, LC 37 and other headstamps - is this stuff worth anything? If so, how much should I ask?

5. Additionally I bought about 70 M1 clips, many of them are rusty (surface rust). Are they worth anything in this condition?

Thanks,

Mark
View Quote


M-1 Garand clips? Or M-1 carbine mags?
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:44:22 PM EST
I would load and shoot the .38's without much thought.

The 45's will be the next most likely to give you good results.

Using commercial 9mm bullets can be a crap shoot. Most commercial 9mm lead bullets are cast too small and you'll likely get leading.

Link Posted: 10/27/2013 6:48:16 PM EST
The fired .30-06 rounds are worth anywhere from a nickle each to maybe 15 cents each depending on what kind of shape the brass is in and how badly the buyer wants them.

Typically rust free Garand clips go for around $1 each at the local gun shows. Rusty ones- figure they are worth 1/2 to 3/4rs that depending on condition.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 5:34:04 AM EST
Oxidized bullets will shoot fine, I would be sure to check that the lube hasn't picked up any grit that would go in my bores. If so, i'd melt and recast. The 3 grain weight variation is nothing with the lube on. Not even much pre lube for pistol. Not even bad for rifle.

old .30 cal brass, meh, it's neat, old but as brass not all that collectible and I'd consider it a bit aged for regular use. (age embrittlement is my concern)
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 1:29:58 PM EST
Thanks for the info guys,

Mark
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