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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 8/16/2005 7:52:58 AM EDT
I was reading the article on the main page about the experimental carbine trapdoor. The article said "The armory designed two experimental carbines, each with a special built-in device for ejecting jammed shells. " What is so special? I thought all trapdoors had a thing to eject the shells.
Link Posted: 8/16/2005 8:45:58 AM EDT
I read something on the Parallax site about one of those being stolen since the 1970's and recently being recovered.

I think the thing was that trapdoors had a habit of NOT ejecting the spent brass shells reliably. The article went into a bit of detail about Custer's troopers having to try and dig the spent brass out with pocket knives.

I'd refer you to the original article for more detail.

Dennis Jenkins



Originally Posted By 243savage:
I was reading the article on the main page about the experimental carbine trapdoor. The article said "The armory designed two experimental carbines, each with a special built-in device for ejecting jammed shells. " What is so special? I thought all trapdoors had a thing to eject the shells.

Link Posted: 8/16/2005 12:13:02 PM EDT

Originally Posted By djenkins:
I read something on the Parallax site about one of those being stolen since the 1970's and recently being recovered.

I think the thing was that trapdoors had a habit of NOT ejecting the spent brass shells reliably. The article went into a bit of detail about Custer's troopers having to try and dig the spent brass out with pocket knives.

I'd refer you to the original article for more detail.

Dennis Jenkins



Originally Posted By 243savage:
I was reading the article on the main page about the experimental carbine trapdoor. The article said "The armory designed two experimental carbines, each with a special built-in device for ejecting jammed shells. " What is so special? I thought all trapdoors had a thing to eject the shells.




I thought that one of the reasons for the jammed carbines was the habit the army had of carrying shells in leather ammo holders and the resulting vertigris?
Link Posted: 8/17/2005 6:27:45 AM EDT
The 45-70 ammo issued in the Custer era was COPPER cased and very "soft"...once the action got dirty or hot and sticky from alot of firing, or if the cases got green corrosion on them, they became hopelessly stuck in the chamber. Even a pocket knife didn't always work for removal, forcing the trooper to use a cleaning rod or dowel to eject the spent case...not very fast...the standard ejector would just rip the rim right off.
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