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Posted: 11/4/2009 6:13:10 AM EST
Is the barrel band really needed? Does it affect accuracy at all? It seems that removing it from an otherwise stock rifle should give you a free-floated barrel (maybe combined with some sanding to the barrel channel) I've noticed that certain 10/22's, like the deluxe model w/ the walnut stock, don't even use the barrel band. That got me wondering what its purpose is. Thanks for any insight
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 7:00:34 AM EST
Shoot a few 10-round groups with it on then with it off. See if having the band on or off makes any difference. Pick the one with the tighter groups (band on or off).
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 7:10:23 AM EST
No it is not necessary at all. I took mine off right after getting home from the store. Most people will agree you want as few things effecting barrel vibrations and harmonics as possible.

There are a couple out there that will shoot better with a band then not, but they are a small number.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 9:17:26 AM EST
I took mine off.

But you should try it with and without to see whether it shoots better one way or the other. Some shoot better with it on. In my experience, most seem to shoot better with it off.

Also, take a thin piece of cardboard, such as a piece of the flap of an ammo box, and slide it underneath, between the stock and barrel. Experiment with the position of this piece until you get best results. (Slide it back and forth.)

Most people get best results with free-floating the barrel but it's always worth the time to experiment a little.
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 11:45:41 AM EST
Originally Posted By Worker11811:
Most people get best results with free-floating the barrel but it's always worth the time to experiment a little.


With the Ruger 10/22 the general concensus is it works best free floated completely except for a 1-2 inch segment. Now where that segment is will vary for each particular rifle, but yes. Take a thin peice of rubber or card stock and experiment with location. It is usually about an inch or two in front of the take down or close to where the stock usually ends. I haven't seen anyone claim it worked best anywhere in the middle of those two spots
Link Posted: 11/4/2009 12:31:47 PM EST

Originally Posted By David_ESM:
Originally Posted By Worker11811:
Most people get best results with free-floating the barrel but it's always worth the time to experiment a little.


With the Ruger 10/22 the general concensus is it works best free floated completely except for a 1-2 inch segment. Now where that segment is will vary for each particular rifle, but yes. Take a thin peice of rubber or card stock and experiment with location. It is usually about an inch or two in front of the take down or close to where the stock usually ends. I haven't seen anyone claim it worked best anywhere in the middle of those two spots

Yep, that's pretty much like doing a bedding job. It isn't as effective, but it does work.
Link Posted: 11/5/2009 1:21:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 11/5/2009 1:25:34 PM EST by firefuzz1]
Using a piece of plastic cut from the top of a butter tub works well for this. Doesn't compress much and won't absorb moisture. This is more like installing a harmonics adjuster (presure point) than a bedding job.

Rob
Link Posted: 11/5/2009 1:27:26 PM EST
Originally Posted By firefuzz1:
Using a piece of plastic cut from the top of a butter tub works well for this. Doesn't compress much and won't absorb moisture. This is more like installing a harmonics adjuster (presure point) than a bedding job. Changing the torque of the take down screw will also effect this.

Rob


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