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9/17/2020 5:59:48 PM
Posted: 10/26/2013 5:00:28 PM EDT
I have an assortment of Browning auto-shotgun designs, but was always missing one little peripheral bit of the story.  Finally filled that gap this morning -- although to be fair, I still need a Savage 720 to complete the "collection."




In before "don't blow your head off"
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 5:15:38 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 10/26/2013 5:16:19 PM EDT by williewvr]
you have a savage 755a?
Link Posted: 10/26/2013 6:34:52 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By williewvr:
you have a savage 755a?
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No, but I also don't have Model 11s in the different gauges available.  It's more a representative collection than a serious collection
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 2:56:23 AM EDT
They called them "Suicide Guns" around here. You kinda got to wonder what they were thinking when that design was approved for production.  
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:13:01 AM EDT
Is that the one they call the "Widow Maker"?

RE: your thread title, I think that's a "relic", not a "curio." I understood the "relics" of C&R were the guns that were 50 years old. The "curios" where the guns that the BATFE added to the list because of their interest to collectors and not necessarily their age. There are lots of curios and relics that never saw military service (most, in fact).
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 4:23:10 PM EDT
I had one of those for a while.  Pretty sweet shooter.  

Not so sweet a design.  
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:58:46 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:
Is that the one they call the "Widow Maker"?

RE: your thread title, I think that's a "relic", not a "curio." I understood the "relics" of C&R were the guns that were 50 years old. The "curios" where the guns that the BATFE added to the list because of their interest to collectors and not necessarily their age. There are lots of curios and relics that never saw military service (most, in fact).
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I meant curio more in terms of the linguistic definition than the legal definition
Link Posted: 10/27/2013 7:59:06 PM EDT
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Originally Posted By 1srelluc:
They called them "Suicide Guns" around here. You kinda got to wonder what they were thinking when that design was approved for production.  
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"Holy shit, we fucked up and need to compete with Browning!!!!"
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 3:49:35 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By sjuhockey10:


I meant curio more in terms of the linguistic definition than the legal definition
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Originally Posted By sjuhockey10:
Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:
Is that the one they call the "Widow Maker"?

RE: your thread title, I think that's a "relic", not a "curio." I understood the "relics" of C&R were the guns that were 50 years old. The "curios" where the guns that the BATFE added to the list because of their interest to collectors and not necessarily their age. There are lots of curios and relics that never saw military service (most, in fact).


I meant curio more in terms of the linguistic definition than the legal definition


Gotcha . . . It certainly is curious that anybody would think that design was a good idea . . .
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 5:22:24 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By Bladeswitcher:

Gotcha . . . It certainly is curious that anybody would think that design was a good idea . . .
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Yep, definitely a unique piece of firearm history, which is why I bought it.  I'll probably take it out to the duck blind once just for the hell of it, then have it as part of the collection.
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:17:15 PM EDT
So what is it, and what were the problems with the design?
Link Posted: 10/28/2013 4:22:00 PM EDT
It diidnt have a charging handle just a knurled patch on the barrel. Just grab it and push down. It delevped a rep for firing during the cycle while the shooter was attempting to load and fire it. Dad had one and never had a problem but it was something he got in a trade and it got traded quickly so it wasn't fired much
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 4:46:08 AM EDT
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Originally Posted By xylo:
So what is it, and what were the problems with the design?
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Whoops, left that part out

It's a Winchester Model 1911 SL.  When John Browning developed what would become the Auto-5/Remington Model 11, he initially took the design to Winchester for production.  Because he wanted a percentage royalty rather than a flat payment for the design, they were unable to work out a deal, so Browning took the design to FN.  Once the Auto-5 hit the market, Winchester realized they needed something to compete, so they enlisted T.C. Johnson (who went on to design the Model 12, among other things) to essentially copy the Auto-5 without infringing on any of Browning's patents.

One of the patents Browning held was for the bolt handle, so they resorted to putting a knurled ring on the barrel, which allowed the shooter to manually cycle the action (since it's recoil-operated) by grabbing the barrel and shoving it back into the receiver.

While this, in and of itself, isn't necessarily a bad design, many people chose to plant the stock in the ground and lean over the barrel while cocking the gun, with predictable results in the event of a slamfire.  This is easily mitigated by both safe gun-handling and the use of the bolt catch.

There were a number of other mechanical shortcomings due to the nature of engineering the gun to avoid Browning's patents, resulting in numerous modifications throughout the gun's production, and ultimately a "recall" by Winchester in which many of the shotguns were replaced by the company with Model 12s.
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 2:13:20 PM EDT
The Savage 755A is a beautiful shotgun.  I have one of these all steel beauties and it shoots like a charm.

The way the receiver and the buttstock curve into each other reminds me of the G3.
Link Posted: 10/29/2013 2:16:17 PM EDT
Dad was forced to sell his back when I was in school but Yes it was a beautiful weapon (except for the cutts comp someone had put on it)
I miss that old 16 gauge, I think it was the first shotgun I ever fired
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