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Posted: 6/12/2009 8:48:14 PM EST
Picked up an Anniversary Kit today. Since this will be my first time rolling my own, I have a quick question.

The only bullets to be had for my load of choice (9mm) were Berry's plated in 147gr.
The only powder that matched up to this weight was Hodgdon HS6... so said the clerk.

I've been looking up stuff on the intarwebs for an hour and the best advice I can find is to either
A) load it to the Hornady XTP recommendation, like the Hodgdon's site says, or
B) load it to lead cast loads, which makes no sense, since the HS6 doesn't list a lead cast for that weight.

Help me to not blow up my hand (or gun... not sure which would be worse).

Link Posted: 6/12/2009 9:50:02 PM EST
right out of the lyman 49th edition book:

HS-6 Sugg. Starting grns: 4.8 Velocity is 866
Max load grns : 5.8 Velocity is 1046

This is for a Speer 147 grn Total Metal Jacketed bullet........which to me would be comparable. 1.115" OAL
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 10:00:01 PM EST
If I'm not mistaken. Rainier, which are plated just like the Berry's you bought, recommends you start off with lead starting loads OR 10% lower than FMJ starting loads if lead loads aren't available.
Link Posted: 6/12/2009 10:41:40 PM EST
Originally Posted By H53EXPERT:
If I'm not mistaken. Rainier, which are plated just like the Berry's you bought, recommends you start off with lead starting loads OR 10% lower than FMJ starting loads if lead loads aren't available.


Hmmm...

Well, straight from the Hodgdon's site:
The only load recommended for 147 gr. with the HS6 is 4.3grs. (starting)
BUT that is with "147 gr. HDY XTP", so I'm not sure if this is lead or FMJ.


Maybe next time I'll just select the load BEFORE I shop.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 1:40:39 AM EST
[Last Edit: 6/14/2009 5:16:59 AM EST by ThePontificator]
What kind of dies are you using? If you are using a Lee 4-die deluxe set you should NOT be using the Factory Crimp Die on plated (oversized bulets) as the resizer ring will undersize the bullet. They preferably need to be seated and taper crimped in two separate steps..the latter being with a standard taper crimp die.

Link Posted: 6/13/2009 2:10:41 AM EST
I pretty much use jacketed bullet loads with the plated bullets but I become very cautious in the upper ranges . With any new load you would start in the low to mid
range and work up anyway . A plated bullet is quite soft compared to a jacketed bullet so care must be taken not to overcrimp or otherwise deform it as you are loading
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 2:51:50 AM EST
Originally Posted By Swamp_Rat_Shooter:
right out of the lyman 49th edition book:

HS-6 Sugg. Starting grns: 4.8 Velocity is 866
Max load grns : 5.8 Velocity is 1046

This is for a Speer 147 grn Total Metal Jacketed bullet........which to me would be comparable. 1.115" OAL


this will work fine.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 5:33:03 AM EST
OP please note that a 'Total Metal Jacketed' (TMJ) bullet is another name for a plated bullet. The Rainier (or Berry's) plated bullets can be loaded using the recipe cited above for the Speer TMJ because they are the same.

Also, it is worth noting that the much respected and renowned Speer Gold Dot is also a TMJ bullet. I use them all plus X-Treme plated bullets with good results in my 40sw, 45acp, and 10mm. In addition, I have some Rainier 30Carb bullets that I shoot regularly through my 1943 M1 Carbine at 1,900fps with great results.

So much for the "don't shot them faster than 1,200fps" crowd.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 2:17:12 PM EST
Start out on the low side of the Speer data and work up. If you experience any problems stop. Reloading, while requiring prudent thought, is not black magic. Nearly any start load, with any reasonable charge range, for a same basic type bullet will give you a place to start. Just load a couple to test the waters so to speak.

If you think this is bad try wildcatting where no data exists and you have to glean info from other similar rounds not necessarily from the same caliber. That is where you get a tingle from the jewels just as you pull the trigger even with the gun well away from you.
Link Posted: 6/13/2009 4:41:19 PM EST
OP please note that a 'Total Metal Jacketed' (TMJ) bullet is another name for a plated bullet. The Rainier (or Berry's) plated bullets can be loaded using the recipe cited above for the Speer TMJ because they are the same.


Wrong answer! Speer TMJ bullets are not IN THE SAME LEAGUE as Berry's or Ranier plated bullets.....Just like Gold Dots are a plated bullet on an equal footing of a jacketed bullet. In the case of Montana Gold CMJ they are a brass jacket with a copper base applied to the bullet.

Simply put when reloading bullets like Rainer or Berry's stick with hard cast lead reloading data!

And, there is lead bullet data listed on the Hodgdon Web site using WSF, other wise consult Lyman 49th for lead bullet data, one can never have too many reloading manuals!
Link Posted: 6/14/2009 5:28:34 AM EST
Edited my earlier post....

You should NOT be using the Lee Factory Carbide Crimp Die to crimp plated bullets. Use the crimp feature on the bullet seating die or buy a separate standard taper crimp die and then seat and taper crimp in two separate steps. You can adjust the seating die to just seat and not crimp.

I sent you an IM that includes a video link on how to use the Lee Bullet Seating Die to either seat/crimp or just seat.

Sorry for any confusion.


Link Posted: 6/14/2009 11:54:07 AM EST
The Lee Factory Crimp die is just fine on plated bullets. (for 9mm)
The LFCD in autopistol calibers applies a taper crimp, and will not damage the plating.

Now it may swage down the bullet, which can be good or bad, depending on several factors...
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