Warning

 

Close

Confirm Action

Are you sure you wish to do this?

Confirm Cancel
Member Login

Posted: 6/15/2016 9:50:58 AM EDT
I got into reloading a couple years ago and loaded some 9mm and .45acp. I recently bought a used glock 20 (10mm) and I'm ready to work up some test rounds. I'm starting with longshot power and I'm seeing some crazy differences in load amounts. Currently, I have 3 projectiles. 180 grain plated, 180 grain lead, and 180 grain XTP JHP. Hodgdon online load data references a 180 GR. SIE JHC. I'm not even sure what that is... But, it states starting loads at 8.5 grains and maximum loads at 9.5 grains. I bought the lead 180 grain projectiles from a fellow reloader (very experienced) and he said I should start at 5.6 grains of longshot and work up to 6.1 grains. Man, that's a big difference in powder amounts.

Anybody help me with these specific loads? I understand I need a reloading manual, but don't know which brand, edition, etc... Any recommendations would be appreciated.
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 10:21:30 AM EDT
I'll check my Lyman 49th when I get home from work. What pages would you like photos of? 9mm/45auto/10mm?
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 10:21:56 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 11:41:09 AM EDT
I actually just collect loads for cartridges I use a lot of.
8-1/2 x 11 pages and the ole' 3-ring binder.

Add tabs at commonly used pages and move them to the front.
You can always read paper when the computer is dead.
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 12:29:23 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By AS556:
I'll check my Lyman 49th when I get home from work. What pages would you like photos of? 9mm/45auto/10mm?
View Quote


That would be awesome. That's all I'm loading currently.
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 12:32:08 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By dryflash3:
I used to suggest Lyman 49, but get the new #50 Lyman manual. Has jacketed and cast data.


For plated use the lead data.


Also understand data will be different, that's normal.


Different firearms were used, bullets, brass, primers, lots of powder, test equipment, and test personnel.


So highly unlikely that all data will be the same.


So what you do is begin at the "start" load (lowest charge listed) and work up watching for pressure signs.


The data in Lyman 49 has been spot on in my experience.


View Quote


Yep, I learned a bit about the variables loading the 9mm and .45acp. I'm just really trying to sort out the safe place to start.
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 12:37:56 PM EDT
PM me your email I'll send them over today.
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 2:51:44 PM EDT
A fellow should have a copy of the Lyman 50th on their reloading bench!
It has jacketed and hard cast lead data.

Remember
That plated bullets, hitek coated bullets, and hard cast bullets all use the same data.

Link Posted: 6/15/2016 3:03:49 PM EDT
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 3:12:44 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/15/2016 3:15:57 PM EDT by Happy2shoot]
For the 10mm I recommend getting the latest Hornady book. I have found other books don't go above 40 s&w speed. That's why you got the 10mm, to go fast right?
Don't bother shooting uncoated lead bullets, there is just no need for it. You can run coated bullets as fast as you want in a 10mm.

Used 10mm huh. Did the guy reload? If so I wouldn't want it. Too many people try to turn the 10mm into a bazooka.
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 3:53:06 PM EDT
I use Load Books for everything I load as they have tons of data from a bunch of sources in them.

I still have hardback manuals on my shelf for the times I load a caliber I don't have a Load Book for.

Powder manufacturer websites are great resources as well and often have updated data that isn't in the manuals.
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 4:35:24 PM EDT
I've been doing this reloading thing since 1985. There are a few good manuals out there but my favorite is what Hornady prints.

The amount of data given for each powder and bullet weight is very likely unbeaten.

If you want to focus on cast bullets then go with one of the Lyman offerings. But for general use the Hornady manual is hard to beat.

Motor
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 6:11:05 PM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Motor1:
I've been doing this reloading thing since 1985. There are a few good manuals out there but my favorite is what Hornady prints.

The amount of data given for each powder and bullet weight is very likely unbeaten.

If you want to focus on cast bullets then go with one of the Lyman offerings. But for general use the Hornady manual is hard to beat.

Motor
View Quote


+1

I always recommend using the manual published by the company making your bullets. They have more experience than anyone else when loading their products.
Link Posted: 6/15/2016 6:43:24 PM EDT
When you really want to blow up watermellons and such, DO NOT START WITH MAX load listed, go -10% WARNING big smiles. Keep and eye for bulges and such, use good or New starline brass and Mag Primers.


Link Posted: 6/24/2016 11:36:34 AM EDT
Discussion ForumsJump to Quoted PostQuote History
Originally Posted By Happy2shoot:
For the 10mm I recommend getting the latest Hornady book. I have found other books don't go above 40 s&w speed. That's why you got the 10mm, to go fast right?
Don't bother shooting uncoated lead bullets, there is just no need for it. You can run coated bullets as fast as you want in a 10mm.

Used 10mm huh. Did the guy reload? If so I wouldn't want it. Too many people try to turn the 10mm into a bazooka.
View Quote


Not sure of the history of it, but it appears to be in excellent shape. Looks to be used very little and never carried. The guy was not a reloader. I paid $360, so I feel like I found a deal.


Link Posted: 6/24/2016 12:30:16 PM EDT
I've found Hornady data to be very mild, especially in .223. YMMV.
Link Posted: 6/24/2016 1:07:10 PM EDT
I like lots of data prior to doing test loads.

I have the Lee, Hornady, Sierra, Lyman and Nosler load books. I also use the Hodgdon and Accurate websites load data.

I take the data provided in each book/website and put it on a spreadsheet by powder and bullet making it easier to compare and then decide where I will start and what ladders I will load.

Like the OP I have noticed some recipes where one source has data where the max is lower than the start load from another source.

I always start low and work my way up.
Top Top