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Posted: 6/5/2008 10:26:26 PM EDT
Anyone neck sizing?

Thinking about getting a Lee Collet Neck Sizer Die 223 Remington to use with my AR.
The idea of not lubing the brass is appealing.
Then I started to wonder if I would have feeding problems.


If I go this route, is there any reason I shouldn't buy the 222Rem version, so that I can use this die with my bolt action 222Rem and my 5.56 AR.
Link Posted: 6/5/2008 10:39:08 PM EDT
It can be done,, but not without a lot of problems,, IMHO, not worth it.
'Borg
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 2:22:18 AM EDT
I would highy suggest that you would not consider neck sizing!  You will be trolling for a jam or perhaps worse....very accurate ammo can be loaded with careful assembly.  I would suggest getting a RCBS precision mic, and a Redding Type S FL die and then the appropriate bushing for you brass and come up with accuracy loads that way...I have stuff with VLD bullets that shoots sub 1/3 of MO out of Wylde chamber 1/8 twist upper...
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 5:14:27 AM EDT
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 6:49:05 AM EDT
yeah bad Idea. even with very precise dies and exact knowledge of what your chamber is a tiny bit of carbon in the chamber screws it all up.

Link Posted: 6/6/2008 7:13:23 AM EDT
Get a body die (or open up the neck on a .223 die to 0.250") and use it with the Collet die.

Less trimming, most concentric sizing and possibly longer brass life WITH full-length resizing.

Link Posted: 6/6/2008 8:31:38 AM EDT

Quoted:
It can be done,, but not without a lot of problems,, IMHO, not worth it.


I have done it, I have encountered no problems, I will continue to use it.

The only issue is making sure the sholder is in the right position. I use an RCBS case micrometer to measure this positioin. THoses cases that are fine, get neck sized, those with the long sholders are pushed back in a body die.

2000 rounds without a failure-to<pick and cause>
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 9:19:11 AM EDT
I have been partial resizing my brass for a while now with out any problems.  After I resize a case I can check it by chambering it in the rifle and making sure the case doesn't stick too much in the chamber when extracted.
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 9:50:17 AM EDT
N-O sizing is for benchrest shooters.  For AR shooters it can add unreliable operation, especially for rapid fire.  Ultimately you will need to full-length size to get reliable chambering of the round.

A good reference for this and many other aspects of reloading can be found in Glen Zediker's book "Handloading for Competition."

http://www.zediker.com/books/handloading/hlmain.html
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 9:56:59 AM EDT

Quoted:
Get a body die (or open up the neck on a .223 die to 0.250") and use it with the Collet die.

Less trimming, most concentric sizing and possibly longer brass life WITH full-length resizing.



Yes!
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 10:28:23 AM EDT
I tired it and only had problems and wound up pulling a bunch of bullets and powder to go back and full size the cases. And yes they were even fired from the same AR. Semi-Auto ='s full size every time to me.
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 12:08:30 PM EDT
Sure it can be done.  I've done it for my AR.  BUT!  (Big Butt) If you get any of your brassed mixed up you're screwed.  Yep, I decided it's not worth it either.  Oh, and I saw no improvement in accuracy in the rifle.
Link Posted: 6/6/2008 5:26:14 PM EDT
I full length size brass for my ARs every time. I neck size and use precision dies for my .223 bolt guns. It's just two different animals. You're just inviting trouble by neck sizing for an autoloader.

For AR accuracy, I recommend a Dillon FL carbide die for ARs in any type press. Start with your own new brass (Winchester, Rem, Lake City, Hornady, Lapua) so that you can control its current and future condition. Buy quality bullets -- milsurp will not provide consistent accuracy because it is not meant to be sub-2MOA. It is good for plinking, not accuracy. Stay away from heavy bullets and penetrators unless you are shooting beyond 250 yards or loading defense rounds -- stick with 50-62 and 65-69, they will cover most all distances accurately. Also, stay with known, clean burning commercial powders that have a track record -- Varget, Ramshot TAC, VhVh, etc.

Buy cheap and you will build cheap inaccurate ammo.

And get yourself a better trigger.
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