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1/25/2018 7:38:29 AM
Posted: 7/2/2002 4:25:48 PM EST
I have a new in box Bushmaster complete lower and I have discovered a 2mm scratch on the right side of the mag well. The scratch goes all the way to the metal and I am wondering if I can fix it or make it not look so bad. Thanks for any helpful information.
Link Posted: 7/2/2002 4:41:08 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/2/2002 4:53:46 PM EST
Where do I get such a pen?
Link Posted: 7/2/2002 5:56:30 PM EST
I will put my AR's through their paces, but like you, I like them to look good too...

You may be able to find them locally... they look like this... flat and more of a gloss... I've got one of each for that 'custom repair blend'...


www.cheaperthandirt.com/ctd/product.asp?dept%5Fid=120705&sku=23432&imgid=&mscssid=LK1VEKKMK3T29GSQRKCFHMPQWXR3CXUD

www.cheaperthandirt.com/ctd/product.asp?dept%5Fid=120705&sku=23406&imgid=&mscssid=LK1VEKKMK3T29GSQRKCFHMPQWXR3CXUD
Link Posted: 7/2/2002 10:05:52 PM EST
Link Posted: 7/2/2002 10:38:06 PM EST
It's a combat weapon.....geeze! If your gun doesn't have a good scratch or two, it's obvious, you aint no "operator"!!!!

You perform in real life only as well as you train....Train HARD!!!!

Take care of your guns yes,,,,but like Troy said, "...it's a tool, not a trophy."

Don't be so scared!

LMAO
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 3:59:07 AM EST
a scratch transforms a pretty face into a real mans gun, no scratches or dings make a gun a safe queen........

heh, heh..., i shud talk, i got 6 non scratched, NIB safe queens but on the other hand i got a bunch of shooters too.......
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 7:28:52 AM EST
Nothing wrong with taking care of a scratch, it doesn't make it a weenie gun or a safe queen. And a scratch isn't going to suddenly make it a 'man's gun', or a lack of them mean 'you ain't no operator'... Sure they'll get scratched when you use them, it's part of the game and the fun. But just because you were crawling through the brush and rocks doesn't mean the weapon has to look like it...

Pride of ownership, boys...
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 7:54:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By 1GUNRUNNER:
I know a guy who is big on BarBQue Black spraypaint.



I resemble that remark...
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 10:14:23 AM EST
OMG, WHAT WILL WE DO!?

I've said this before and I'm say it again.

1. Get a recorder.
2. Hit "record"
3. Say outloud your original post.
4. Hit "stop"
5. Hit "play" and listen to yourself.
6. Lame huh?
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 12:18:09 PM EST
My Bushmaster is SCRATCHED!

You've just illustrated the difference between an operator and a hobbyist.
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 12:47:02 PM EST
For those of you so unconcerned about the finish or nasty scratches in it, why bother having a finish at all?

Link Posted: 7/3/2002 12:58:06 PM EST
A 2 mm scratch? LOL!

I'm pretty finnicky about that stuff to,but "2 mm"?
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 1:03:10 PM EST

Originally Posted By Boomer:
For those of you so unconcerned about the finish or nasty scratches in it, why bother having a finish at all?



A 2mm scratch? Are you a f***ing girl?
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 1:15:53 PM EST
To each of you "operator" could-give-a-shit-about-finish-it-just-means-I-use-it-types, a question.

When you go to buy a used rifle, what's the FIRST thing you look at?

I've seen some beat to shit relics at the fun show you guys would be proud to own.

Sure weapons are tools. How were you raised to treat your tools?

I oil my saws, wipe hand tools when I'm done with them, and don't toss them on the ground when I'm done with them.

Same with my firearms. They may see hard use, but they don't look like it.

Maybe I'm really a girl.
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 1:23:10 PM EST
[Last Edit: 7/3/2002 1:29:32 PM EST by DarkStar]

Originally Posted By DFBonnett:

A 2mm scratch? Are you a f***ing girl?




This is why I so love AR15.com... the intelligent conversation, the thought-provoking exchange of ideas...

edited to add: I'm very glad I was taught at a young age to care for my 'tools'... the person who taught me that left me a good number of antique firearms that were used hard yet are still in pristine condition...
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 1:24:39 PM EST
Are you planning on entering it in a beauty contest?

There must be some equivalent to car shows for AR-15's. Or Maybe it's your Formal Evening Rifle?

Link Posted: 7/3/2002 1:29:40 PM EST
Come on guys, surely you can appreciate the irony of someone named "Bonnet" accusing another member of being a girl.

For the more intelligent among us, a "2mm scrath" could be interpreted in several ways. It could be 2mm wide, 2mm deep, 2mm long, whatever.

Any exposed, unprotected material is a pathway for corrosion. That's why they put a finish on them in the first place. D'oh!
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 1:32:42 PM EST

Originally Posted By EagleArmsHBAR:
I have a new in box Bushmaster complete lower and I have discovered a 2mm scratch on the right side of the mag well. The scratch goes all the way to the metal and I am wondering if I can fix it or make it not look so bad. Thanks for any helpful information.



Also, for all the "me, too" pilers on who think he's a pansy, it is NEW, meaning he DIDN'T scratch it himself while using it.

I personally inspect ALL firearms and most other things I buy and hand select the one in the best shape.

But see above, I may be a girl.
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 1:34:49 PM EST


hey, the man asked how to fix his scratch fellas, not for a lecture on how wussy he is for not liking the scratch.

give the man a break.

-Spaceman


Link Posted: 7/3/2002 1:35:05 PM EST
I keep hearing that aluminum can corrode.

but the pitted aluminum rims on my jeep were exposed to the elements an they never corroded.

Military 16's have tons of exposed aluminum on them with no corrosion.
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 2:22:19 PM EST
OK DAD!

Just just read 2 mm and "interpreted"it to be pretty miniscule and rather humorous.

Besides its already been said to fix it with a pen,which ought to be pretty weather resistant....no?
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 2:28:07 PM EST

Originally Posted By markm:
I keep hearing that aluminum can corrode.

but the pitted aluminum rims on my jeep were exposed to the elements an they never corroded.

Military 16's have tons of exposed aluminum on them with no corrosion.



Perhaps you should tell that to the passengers of Aloha Flight 243. Especially the flight attendant who was sucked out 24,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean.
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 2:43:08 PM EST

Originally Posted By Boomer:

Originally Posted By markm:
I keep hearing that aluminum can corrode.

but the pitted aluminum rims on my jeep were exposed to the elements an they never corroded.

Military 16's have tons of exposed aluminum on them with no corrosion.



Perhaps you should tell that to the passengers of Aloha Flight 243. Especially the flight attendant who was sucked out 24,000 feet above the Pacific Ocean.



Not to be a jackass, but there is a difference between corroded metal and fatigued metal, which was the case of the jet.

After thousands of compressions and decompressions the metal simply gave way. Metal doesn't have to be corroded to break.
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 3:38:18 PM EST
Aircraft Accident Investigation



Another type of localized corrosion, common to aircraft materials and particularly to high-strength aluminum alloys, is called 'exfoliation corrosion' . Exfoliation corrosion was involved in the Aloha Flight 243 air disaster (April, 1988). Corrosion originating in fastener holes in the thin, aluminum sheets that make-up the 'skin' of the fuselage. The corrosion penetrated from many rivet holes and along the mid-thickness of the skin in all directions weakening the ability of the fuselage skin to carry, for example, cabin-pressurization loads. This corrosion phenomenon may be likened to what water penetration does to the strength and usefulness of particle-board. Exfoliation is more likely to occur in older aircraft, and aircraft serving coastal or transoceanic routes are more prone to this problem. Exfoliation corrosion is not easy to see as the damage spreads along the mid-thickness of the sheet, not at the surface. One must include an inspection requirement to detect exfoliation and crack damage in older aircraft, and this is part of the action taken by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) in the wake of the Aloha Flight 243 incident.



If you want to get more specific, it should be noted that the 737 in question was primarilly used for short flights between the Hawaiian Islands and did not frequently achieve full cabin pressurization. So metal fatigue alone was not the primary culprit.

Also, pages 3-66 and 3-67 of TM9-1005-319-23&P address acceptable/serviceable levels of corrosion and repairability for the M16. While a 2mm scratch really isn't all that much to worry about, the TM does illustrate the importance of a proper protective finish. In short, there is a reason that they go to the bother of specifying a finish.

Guys, if you want to mistreat, neglect, and abuse your own equipment, have at it. Just don't be surprised if it fails you at some critical moment. Why knock a guy who properly cares for his equipment and investment?
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 3:41:03 PM EST

Originally Posted By Boomer:
Aircraft Accident Investigation



Another type of localized corrosion, common to aircraft materials and particularly to high-strength aluminum alloys, is called 'exfoliation corrosion' . Exfoliation corrosion was involved in the Aloha Flight 243 air disaster (April, 1988). Corrosion originating in fastener holes in the thin, aluminum sheets that make-up the 'skin' of the fuselage. The corrosion penetrated from many rivet holes and along the mid-thickness of the skin in all directions weakening the ability of the fuselage skin to carry, for example, cabin-pressurization loads. This corrosion phenomenon may be likened to what water penetration does to the strength and usefulness of particle-board. Exfoliation is more likely to occur in older aircraft, and aircraft serving coastal or transoceanic routes are more prone to this problem. Exfoliation corrosion is not easy to see as the damage spreads along the mid-thickness of the sheet, not at the surface. One must include an inspection requirement to detect exfoliation and crack damage in older aircraft, and this is part of the action taken by the FAA (Federal Aviation Administration) in the wake of the Aloha Flight 243 incident.






Hmmm... I watched something about this flight not too long ago on the Discovery Channel and they faulted metal fatigue from frequent cabin pressurization as the culprit.

They claimed that although it didn't fly as high as other jets which achieved full pressurization it made many more short "hops" with partial pressurization compared to other jets causing the fatigue.

I guess it's true that you can't believe everything that you hear on TV.
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 6:38:53 PM EST
Tell ya what, you scratch one of my prized weapons and I'll scratch your eye out.. :)

Fair trade??


*wink*
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 6:58:34 PM EST
How do you link some slut getting sucked out of an airplane to some retard with a little scratch on his bushy?

I mean... a scratch on my rifle won't risk anyones life.

Link Posted: 7/3/2002 9:13:53 PM EST
Types of corrosion:

Oxidation, also known as dry corrosion, or by its common anme oxidation or rust.
When bare aluminum is exposed to the oxygen in the ari, a chemical reaction takes place at the surface between the metal and the oxygen.
Aluminum alloy may be protected from corrosion by elecrolytically or chemically forming a hard oxide film on its surface.

Surface corrosion occurs when unprotected metal is exposed to an atmosphere that contains industrial contaminants, exhaust fumes or battery fumes. It willgive the unprotected metal a dull appearance. These will form into salts of corrosion. If it is not removed and the metal treated the corrosion may eat through the entire skin or structure.

Intergranular corrosion.
Aluminum alloys are made up of extremly tiny grains of aluminum and its alloying elements.
This metal is hardened by heating and cooling it in perscribed methods. If the cooling of the metal is not done immediatly these grains will reach a size that will produce the anodic and cthodic areas needed for corrosion to form.
Intergranular corrosion is harder to detect because it is inside of the metal.

Exfoliation corrosion is an extreme case of intergranular corrosion that occurs chiefly in extruded materials like channels or angles where grain structure is more layer like that it is in rolled sheet metal or castings.
By the time exfoliation corrosion shows up the strength of the metal has been destroyed.

Stress corrosion is a form of intergranular corrosion that forms in a metal when it is subjected to a tensile stress in the presence of a corrosive enviroment.
Stress corrosion often forms between rivits in a stressed skin, around pressed-in bushings, and around tapered pipe fittings.

Galvanic corrosion occurs when two dis-simlay metals make contact in the presence of an electroyte

Concentration corrosion occurs when water is trapped between two metal surfaces of an aircraft structure and it has no way to drain or evaporate. A chemical conversion takes place and the water deposits negative hydroxide ions which combine with the aluminum to form aluminum hydroxide or corrosion.

Fretting corrosion forms between two surfaces which fit tightly together. These surfaces are not close enough together to shut out oxygen, so the surfaces are coated to prevent corrosion. This coating is destroyed by the continous rubbing action of the metal. By the time fretting corrosion appears the damage is done and the part needs to be replaced.

Filiform corrosion is an organic corrosion that forms on the surface of metals coated with organic substances like paint. Filiform corrosion looks like long threadlike filliments. They do not require sunlight to spread.
Link Posted: 7/3/2002 9:38:40 PM EST

Originally Posted By markm:
How do you link some slut getting sucked out of an airplane to some retard with a little scratch on his bushy?





Those are f**king harsh words man. I think you pretty much offended everybody.
Link Posted: 7/4/2002 5:10:43 AM EST
Its that time of month.
Link Posted: 7/4/2002 6:12:08 AM EST
I think.... IT'S TIME FOR A PHOTO POSTING CONTEST.
WHO's GOT THE UGLIEST RIFLE?
winner gets bragging rights.
Link Posted: 7/4/2002 8:28:42 AM EST

No, sorry, its not mine but I couldnt resist!
Link Posted: 7/4/2002 10:24:41 AM EST
Now that's a man's weapon!
Link Posted: 7/4/2002 10:30:01 AM EST
By the selector and config & overall condition. I would say Uncle Sam Has sent said weapon to some strange shitholes. Along with it's operator?
Link Posted: 7/4/2002 3:26:41 PM EST
I personally like the way a battle rifle looks when the finish is worn off, lot's of low crawling around is good for a rifle.

I have two FAL kits, 1 completely worn down to bare metal and looks great, it's called patina.

The other FAL is completely refinished, and the little scratches it does get, look awful.

So I agree with EagleArmsHBAR, it probably looks bad, but if he drags it around by a string through the sand for a week or two, it would look great to me.
Link Posted: 7/6/2002 6:45:45 AM EST
The thing about this board that never ceases to amaze me:

The unbelievable ability of the members to stay on topic.


You can pick up the BirchwoodCasey pen at most spoting goods stores - I know that Dick's carries 'em.

Tony
Link Posted: 7/6/2002 7:37:57 AM EST
Dick's????
Are you trying to say something?

LOL
Marks A Lot works well. Or get the Rub A Dub laundry marker.
Link Posted: 7/6/2002 8:41:46 AM EST
[Last Edit: 7/6/2002 8:44:18 AM EST by Hk45USP]
Oh geeze, a bunch of wussies here. Yes you're gonna take care of your equipment, but it's just a scratch.

Do you buy a jeep to go off road, or drive it on the pavement and only on sundays?

Do you buy tools to use and put "wear" marks on them, or just hang them on the workbench wall and keep them all sparkly clean and new looking?

Do you buy running shoes to run/sprint/jog with or to go to job interviews and formal dances with?

The list can go on and on....I mean come on...A gun when used, is gonna get scratched now and then. If it doesn't get scratched, nicked, mared or whatever, then YOU AIN'T SHOOTN YOUR GUN ENOUGH! (LMAO).

Oh for cryn out loud. Comparing the jet airplane crash with a scratch on a gun. Gimmie a break. You're comparing fly piss with dragon shit.

Also, to "CITADELGRAD87", you're weak. Annapolis-1981.
Link Posted: 7/6/2002 11:17:53 PM EST
This thread has me so pissed I'll respond to everyone individually.

Like the man stated, it's NIB - NIB should mean NIB, not NIB with scratches. Would you want to buy your rough tough brand new 4wd off the lot with scratches in the paint? The answer is no.

DarkStar voiced my opinion perfectly - "I will put my AR's through their paces, but like you, I like them to look good too...".

Hey, Mr. no email Hk45USP - hey, Mr. hotmail addy with USA as location DFBonnett - who are you two "operators" for? Lets meet up at the Hun Farm October 11, 12, 13 and ya'll can give me some tips. I'd love to learn from a couple of real life "operators".


MurderSHO45 - his post was lame? Like your double but not duplicate posts on 06/11/02 AND 06/03/02 (4 posts total - one would have done fine) regarding your carrier key. RTFM - key staking is explained - you should have checked the stakes first anyway. Hey, Murder, go to your post at: www.ar15.com/forums/topic.html?id=115501
Now:
1. Get a recorder.
2. Hit "record"
3. Say outloud your original post.
4. Hit "stop"
5. Hit "play" and listen to yourself.
6. Lame huh?

Good Lord - it was just this last March that you were asking what position to get your body in to zero your rifle....... must be another "operator".


markm - your Jeep rims are clear coated - pull your head out. If a weapon has exposed metal on it and it hasn't corroded, that's because it was oiled - period.


I liked these two posts together:
***************
BuLLet
Tell ya what, you scratch one of my prized weapons and I'll scratch your eye out.. :)

Fair trade?? *wink*
***************

markm
How do you link some slut getting sucked out of an airplane to some retard with a little scratch on his bushy?

I mean... a scratch on my rifle won't risk anyones life.
**************

Made me think "you scratch my rifle and depending on your attitude about it - you might just be risking your own life".


Good luck on the scratch, EagleArmsHBAR - I hope you can disguise it perfectly!

Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:14:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By Tate:
markm - your Jeep rims are clear coated - pull your head out. If a weapon has exposed metal on it and it hasn't corroded, that's because it was oiled - period.



If they're was a clear coat on them it long word off from the sand pitting, still no corrossion.

I have plenty of exposed aluminum on my AR, and I'm not dumb enough to oil the surface and attract dirt and grime. Yet, there is no corrosion on it, WOW!
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 9:16:34 AM EST

Originally Posted By new-arguy:

No, sorry, its not mine but I couldnt resist!

I'm willing to bet that the owner of this rifle is not the type of guy to start the "HOW DO I GET THE BRASS MARKS OFF OF THE DEFLECTOR?" thread.
Link Posted: 7/7/2002 10:58:44 AM EST

Originally Posted By markm:
I'm willing to bet that the owner of this rifle is not the type of guy to start the "HOW DO I GET THE BRASS MARKS OFF OF THE DEFLECTOR?" thread.



He's probably another one of our resident "trained operators" asking what finishes are more durable than Krylon spray paint.
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