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9/22/2017 12:11:25 AM
Posted: 9/5/2005 1:13:41 AM EDT
Anyone ever try Moly Resin on Stainless steel? i've got a threaded barrel for my 1911. It's stainless, and total length is 5.5 inches. in WI, to use a pistol for deer hunting it has to have a 5.5 barrel. But i don't really like the shiny appearance. Been thinking about hitting it up externally with moly resin. Anyone tried something like this before?
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 5:55:28 AM EDT
I've done stainless rifle barrels. Just a light sandblast on about 40psi to sterilize the surface and apply.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 5:57:59 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 50cal:
I've done stainless rifle barrels. Just a light sandblast on about 40psi to sterilize the surface and apply.



What did you use? I read somewhere about Aluminum something or another in 120 "grit"

As you can see, I recall enough to be dangerous. Can you fill in the blanks?

Thanks
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:01:33 AM EDT
We have silicon carbide sand in our blaster at work. I have used the aluminum oxide media also.
The 120 grit media gives a nice smooth finish. Anything rougher seems like it abrades the base metal too much.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:05:58 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 50cal:
We have silicon carbide sand in our blaster at work. I have used the aluminum oxide media also.
The 120 grit media gives a nice smooth finish. Anything rougher seems like it abrades the base metal too much.



I've used a lot of the norel's on gun parts, but they always had some sort of finish on them aleady (ie parkerizing). I'm about to finsh an 18 SPR barrel and I couldn't recall the info you so clearly provided above.

120 grit
Any pros or cons on the slicon carbide vs. aluminium oxide. I'm headed out this week to buy some media.

Thanks
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:10:49 AM EDT
No real difference in the work the media does. The carbide sand lasts a really long time, but wears out your blaster gun pretty quickly.
The aluminum oxide does a great job, but turns to silt powder pretty quickly. If you have a blaster cabinet that sees infrequent use, go with the aluminum oxide media. A 50 lb bag should last a long time.

Thoroughly degrease the part before blasting, no need to contaminate the blaster media.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:15:25 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 50cal:
No real difference in the work the media does. The carbide sand lasts a really long time, but wears out your blaster gun pretty quickly.
The aluminum oxide does a great job, but turns to silt powder pretty quickly. If you have a blaster cabinet that sees infrequent use, go with the aluminum oxide media. A 50 lb bag should last a long time.

Thoroughly degrease the part before blasting, no need to contaminate the blaster media.



Thanks. The de-greasing criteria I'm all to familiar with. Nothing slimmy....
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:17:58 AM EDT
Glad to help.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 6:55:56 AM EDT
So....what about for those of us that don't have a bead/sand blaster? Would roughing up the surface a bit with sandpaper be a total hack job?
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 7:01:43 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NAM:
So....what about for those of us that don't have a bead/sand blaster? Would roughing up the surface a bit with sandpaper be a total hack job?



I tried that. Didn't seem to do much. I boiught a cheapo sandblaster to see how it works. I'll post updates, maybe later today.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 7:06:44 AM EDT

Originally Posted By NAM:
So....what about for those of us that don't have a bead/sand blaster? Would roughing up the surface a bit with sandpaper be a total hack job?



No, the paper doesn't get down in the pores of the material enough. It also leaves behind residue that will clog the pores and the resin will not adhere or cure on.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 7:30:51 AM EDT

Originally Posted By 50cal:
No, the paper doesn't get down in the pores of the material enough. It also leaves behind residue that will clog the pores and the resin will not adhere or cure on.



crud.
Link Posted: 9/5/2005 7:44:32 AM EDT
50 cal,
If you're still listening...What does "bead" blasting do to metal? Is it purely a cosmetic function?
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 6:15:11 AM EDT
bead blasting is the same thing, except using glass microspheres instead of the sc or alo as media.

Gives a real soft satin finish.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 7:33:34 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Mike_in_Seattle:
bead blasting is the same thing, except using glass microspheres instead of the sc or alo as media.

Gives a real soft satin finish.



OK, just what I thought. It's creates a different appearance but is not a functional media for preping stainless steel for re-finishing work (ie. Duracoat/Molyresin).

Thanks for your help.
Link Posted: 9/6/2005 2:08:46 PM EDT
[Last Edit: 9/6/2005 2:09:56 PM EDT by 50cal]
glass beading also leaves behind a residue. It is ideal for bluing, but really sucks for parkerizing or sterilizing for a teflon/moly/resin coat.

If at all possible, use an aluminum oxide media, 120 grit or finer.


Oh yeah, don't forget to plug the bore. You sure don't want to blast your chamber area. It will frost it in a heartbeat. Then you will have hard extraction in semi autos.
Link Posted: 9/7/2005 5:37:35 PM EDT
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