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Posted: 1/26/2011 6:58:54 PM EDT
Is the Modern Reloading book legit? I am thinking about getting the book+press kit.

I tried to do a search but nothing came up.
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 7:06:59 PM EDT
[#1]
Quoted:
Is the Modern Reloading book legit? I am thinking about getting the book+press kit.

I tried to do a search but nothing came up.


It's interesting to read some of the things Lee says but as far as loading data goes you want the Lyman #49 instead.



Posted Via AR15.Com Mobile
Link Posted: 1/26/2011 10:50:02 PM EDT
[#2]
Hello MX and SX...imho get two or three of the newest current manuals. the broader range of info will allow you more options in picking loads. Also go to every bullet maker's website and look them over for load data. Then, do yourself a favor and look in all the nearby used bookstores for load manuals from as far back as say the 60's or 70's. You will find some very solid stout loads that are still valid. That is assuming you follow normal procedures of starting your powder charges 10-15% low and working up towards max. The older manuals were written before the lawyers got to management and cut off their balls, due to knuckleheads trying to make 30-30s into 300 Weatherby mags. The Lee book reminds me a little of the old Herters load manual from the late 50's that I still have. Alot of self-promotin goin on, but a lot of solid data in there also. I use mine frequently. Best to ya, 44.


oh, and I used the free press as a dedicated depriming press, using universal deprime dies, for my hunting/target loads. 223's get done on a progressive.
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 12:50:05 AM EDT
[#3]
Lee, Lyman, Speer, Hornady, Nosler, etc.... Get em all if you can.  If you can't get more than a few.... Lyman and Lee are probably my favorites.

The Lee book is great for reloading using Lee gear as it is very specific in the loads and instructions to Lee gear.  I would recommend it to anyone who is pondering reloading.  

I've only found a few loads in the Lee book that made me .  Someone here recently found a .38spl load that was odd... Not certain how that ended up.
I tend to look in three or four manuals when I start a new load... 99 times out of 100 all the books will overlap.  if I run into an outlier, I start over with different components.

Link Posted: 1/27/2011 3:51:51 AM EDT
[#4]
Quoted:
Is the Modern Reloading book legit? I am thinking about getting the book+press kit.

I tried to do a search but nothing came up.


    Pretty good book ( lots of sales propaganda , also ) , but get the Lyman loading manual first .

    Most of these books try to hype thair own brand of stuff .

God bless
Wyr
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 4:29:49 AM EDT
[#5]
Lots of good info.  I've been reloading for about 3 years I started with Modern Reloading, and keep buying more manuals as I go.
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 4:55:05 AM EDT
[#6]
Lyman #49 is a must have for reloading. Then buy other books just to add enjoyment to the hobby.
Link Posted: 1/27/2011 5:11:39 AM EDT
[#7]
Richard Lee has probably forgotten more about reloading than most of us will ever know.  The book is a good primer of all things reloading but is specfict to Lee reloading products.

If you are just starting out get the ABC's of reloading and read it cover to cover, multiple times.

If you haven't bought any equipment get the ABC's fist.  You may determine from the read that this is not going to be for you, it isn't for everyone.  If it is then the lee kit is a good, cheap place to start.  You can produce good rounds with it.  Eventually you will probably buy different equipment depending on your needs and wants.  Different brands of equipment are better for different types of reloading.

Despite what some will tell you it is not necessary to get brainwashed by the blue kool-aid from the start, but you may end up there if you are pumping out thousands of rounds a week.

Good luck and welcome aboard
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 6:54:23 PM EDT
[#8]
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 7:30:31 PM EDT
[#9]
I have the Lee 2nd book. If your going to use a Lee press it's the book to have. I have other books from bullet manfactures. The more the better. That's IMHO.

Mike
Link Posted: 1/28/2011 7:44:50 PM EDT
[#10]
I would try to get several manuals but the first one I go to is the Hornady manual,accompanied by the Hogdgon manual,they both update their info more often than any of the others,plus most of the powders you will find are made by Hogdgon,or imported by them under another name.Hornady makes bullets for alot of other companies,as does Nosler,if you load some of the polymer tip bullets.Both Hogdgon and Hornady go above and beyond to provide all of us with the newest updated info.Also Hogdgon  puts alot of their load info on their website for all of us to enjoy!!

I once talked to Bruce Hogdgon many years ago,and believe me ,what he knew of powders and reloading  would take a warehouse to store all of the info.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 3:55:22 PM EDT
[#11]
What are everyone's thoughts on the Hornady Reloading book (either 7th or 8th Ed.)?
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 4:15:05 PM EDT
[#12]
I got the same kit couple-three years ago.  I enjoy the book; feel like I did learn from it and use the press for a dedicated deprimer with a universal decapping die.

I also have the Lyman #49- it is good to have more than one for cross-reference.  There are more opitons for loads and more, different information.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 4:50:31 PM EDT
[#13]
The Hornady 8th edition would be a very good start,and the first I would get.Nothing wrong with the 7th but you need the latest info.I dont have that edition myself,I have been kinda out of circulation for awhile but when I can I am gonna get the new Hornady manual.The last one i have is the 7th edition I think but I will be getting the newest one very soon.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 5:02:14 PM EDT
[#14]
Quoted:
Hello MX and SX...imho get two or three of the newest current manuals. the broader range of info will allow you more options in picking loads. Also go to every bullet maker's website and look them over for load data. Then, do yourself a favor and look in all the nearby used bookstores for load manuals from as far back as say the 60's or 70's. You will find some very solid stout loads that are still valid. That is assuming you follow normal procedures of starting your powder charges 10-15% low and working up towards max. The older manuals were written before the lawyers got to management and cut off their balls, due to knuckleheads trying to make 30-30s into 300 Weatherby mags. The Lee book reminds me a little of the old Herters load manual from the late 50's that I still have. Alot of self-promotin goin on, but a lot of solid data in there also. I use mine frequently. Best to ya, 44.


oh, and I used the free press as a dedicated depriming press, using universal deprime dies, for my hunting/target loads. 223's get done on a progressive.


I'd use caution going back to the "stout" loads from the sixties, I read an interesting article by Layne Simpson, who worked for Speer developing their load data for the speer manual. He stated that many of their tests were done with copper crush barrels and engineering calculations back in the day. When they later revisited them with modern test equipment capable of making a direct measurement, they said "oops, thats a lot hotter than we predicted" and had to revise the loads. The engineers, not the lawyers.....Shooting Times, I think....

Link Posted: 1/30/2011 5:13:09 PM EDT
[#15]
Quoted:
Quoted:
Hello MX and SX...imho get two or three of the newest current manuals. the broader range of info will allow you more options in picking loads. Also go to every bullet maker's website and look them over for load data. Then, do yourself a favor and look in all the nearby used bookstores for load manuals from as far back as say the 60's or 70's. You will find some very solid stout loads that are still valid. That is assuming you follow normal procedures of starting your powder charges 10-15% low and working up towards max. The older manuals were written before the lawyers got to management and cut off their balls, due to knuckleheads trying to make 30-30s into 300 Weatherby mags. The Lee book reminds me a little of the old Herters load manual from the late 50's that I still have. Alot of self-promotin goin on, but a lot of solid data in there also. I use mine frequently. Best to ya, 44.


oh, and I used the free press as a dedicated depriming press, using universal deprime dies, for my hunting/target loads. 223's get done on a progressive.


I'd use caution going back to the "stout" loads from the sixties, I read an interesting article by Layne Simpson, who worked for Speer developing their load data for the speer manual. He stated that many of their tests were done with copper crush barrels and engineering calculations back in the day. When they later revisited them with modern test equipment capable of making a direct measurement, they said "oops, thats a lot hotter than we predicted" and had to revise the loads. The engineers, not the lawyers.....Shooting Times, I think....



+1  Always consult and or buy the newest manuals you can find.Load info changes often,just like lot numbers of powders.Gotta be careful!!!
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 6:14:14 PM EDT
[#16]
The LEE book is very economical compared to the others and as has been said, it's great if you are getting a LEE kit. It's like $13 online... it's well worth that. I enjoyed reading it too, it has a very friendly and familiar tone. On the LEE kits, the pricing is very friendly.. and for the most part the kits are really nice. I think they are a great way to get into reloading. I really like my LEE press, dies and primer system... the powder thrower too. Those are great. Some of the smaller things, like the scale, brass trimming, etc.. might leave something to be desired, but again for the price... you just can't beat it. Even if you decided to upgrade later, you will have gotten your money's worth out of the LEE setup, and if reloading isn't for you, well you're not out that much either. There are quite a few videos on youtube that cover the LEE kits... so check those out if you can't find anything else.
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 7:15:01 PM EDT
[#17]
Link Posted: 1/30/2011 8:06:13 PM EDT
[#18]
Wondering if anyone has any other good manuals to suggest maybe more focused on precision loading for an AR or related reloading.

These are what I have on the shelf now:

Sierra V 4th printing
Lyman 49th
Hornady 7th
Hornady 8th
Speer #14
Nosler 6
Barnes #4
Lee MR 2nd Edition
RCBS Load 2.0 software
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 5:58:47 AM EDT
[#19]
I have the Lee Book and the Hornaday book.  I want to pick up the Sierra Book because I am using a lot of their bullets.  I try to go to the Manufacture of the bullet for the load info.

I compare the bullet and powder manufacture info to see what load I want out start at.

MAHA
Link Posted: 2/1/2011 7:10:53 AM EDT
[#20]
I use the hornady 7 almost exclusively as I use mostly Hornady bullets.  I need to update to the 8 and compare data to see what has changed.

my manual is all highlighted and notated.

You can never have too many manuals.  I have a couple editions of the Hogdon and alot of sierra data from their website.  The Hornady is still the goto book for me.
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