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Posted: 6/27/2003 10:50:26 AM EDT
I just got some Breakfree CLP and some Shooters Choice Copper Remover. Is there any problem using these solvents together? And, is it a bad idea to use a coated cleaning rod when using the copper remover? P.S. The only degreeser I have is Simple Green, is that good enough to neutralize the copper solvent? Thanks.
Link Posted: 6/27/2003 1:34:43 PM EDT

Originally Posted By hickboy:
I just got some Breakfree CLP and some Shooters Choice Copper Remover. Is there any problem using these solvents together? And, is it a bad idea to use a coated cleaning rod when using the copper remover? P.S. The only degreeser I have is Simple Green, is that good enough to neutralize the copper solvent? Thanks.



I'm assuming the SC is ammonia based. There's no problem using the two together. I would suggest cleaning the powder fouling out with the CLP first and then hit the copper with the SC. Then run a pass with CLP. I use Hoppe's #9 and Sweet's together in my boltgun with no ill effects. If you really want to neutralize the SC just swab the bore with rubbing alcohol. It really isn't necessary, but some feel better doing it. In a chrome-lined gun, I just use CLP only.
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 5:44:24 AM EDT
First of guys, Beakfree w/CLP is not a solvent. You shouldn't be using it as such. Second, I only use two products on all of my guns, Butch's Bore Shine, and regular Shooter's Choice. Both of these products contain ammonia, and will take the copper out of a bore, when given the chance to work. My cleaning procedure is simple. It's a 2-beer process...

1) Get a beer from the fridge, and empty it into frosty glass (this is important).
2) Push dry patches down the bore of the gun, until the black turns gray.
3) Apply solvent to 3 patches, and push them down the bore (one direction only, please).
4) Allow solvent to work, while drinking the poured beer, and watching re-runs of 'The Man Show'. After all, you're cleaning a gun. What's more manly than that?
5) When said beer is finished, apply solvent to 3 more patches, and push them down the barrel.
6) Retrieve another beer from the fridge, and consume.
7) Apply solvent to one more patch, push down the bore (always, only in one direction), and then start pushing dry patches down. Clean until the black turns very light gray, and you're done.

If there's any copper in the bore, Butch's and SC will get it, and it will be evident when the patches dry (they'll have a blue tint to them) I clean all of my guns this way, sometimes with the beer, sometimes without. The process works. The only other thing that I might do, is push a brush down the bore in the very beginning. And that's only if the gun was used extensively that day.
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 6:43:01 AM EDT
RobarSR60...CLP may not be a "solvent", but it is a cleaner and I've been using it as such for about 15 years. It removes powder fouling and carbon just fine. I agree that an ammonia based cleaner is what's needed to remove copper (if you feel it's necessary to remove the copper). For my chrome-lined "blasters", I use CLP only. For my boltgun, I use a mixture of Hoppe's #9 and Hoppe's Black Powder Solvent (Speedy Formula) to remove powder and Sweet's to remove copper. My procedure is as follows:

Step1 - Insert Jones bore guide into receiver and chamber.

Step 2 - Run one wet patch of Sweets through the bore and let soak for approximately 30 seconds. Do not patch this out.

Step 3 – Next, run the brush through the barrel only enough to expose the entire brush. Once the brush is exposed, saturate it well with the Speedy Formula and SLOWLY run the brush through the bore 10 complete back and forth passes while keeping the rod as straight as possible. Let this sit a minute or two and proceed to the next step.

Step 4 - After you have let the barrel soak for a few moments, saturate a patch with the Speedy Formula and pass it through the bore. Follow this with 2 dry patches and then dry the chamber with Brake Parts Cleaner.

This is only for my boltgun. My chrome-lineds don't get this much attention.
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 8:10:30 AM EDT

Originally Posted By Bradd_D:

Step 2 - Run one wet patch of Sweets through the bore and let soak for approximately 30 seconds. Do not patch this out.

Step 3 – Next, run the brush through the barrel only enough to expose the entire brush. Once the brush is exposed, saturate it well with the Speedy Formula and SLOWLY run the brush through the bore 10 complete back and forth passes while keeping the rod as straight as possible. Let this sit a minute or two and proceed to the next step.



I assume that you're using a nylon brush for this procedure? If not, all you're doing is leeching the copper from the brass brush.
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 11:33:24 AM EDT

Originally Posted By RobarSR60:

Originally Posted By Bradd_D:

Step 2 - Run one wet patch of Sweets through the bore and let soak for approximately 30 seconds. Do not patch this out.

Step 3 – Next, run the brush through the barrel only enough to expose the entire brush. Once the brush is exposed, saturate it well with the Speedy Formula and SLOWLY run the brush through the bore 10 complete back and forth passes while keeping the rod as straight as possible. Let this sit a minute or two and proceed to the next step.



I assume that you're using a nylon brush for this procedure? If not, all you're doing is leeching the copper from the brass brush.



Actually, nylon is horribly abrasive. Take a look at the eyelets on a fishing pole sometime. I'm not a proponent of getting every speck of powder and copper out of the bore so I expect to leave a little behind. I'm a believer that too much cleaning is far worse than not enough.
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 11:46:37 AM EDT
[Last Edit: 6/28/2003 11:47:31 AM EDT by Kooter]

and push them down the bore (one direction only, please).



what is your reasoning for only going in one direction? i have heard other people say this before. when i was at the Olympic Training Center in Colo Sprgs, we had a class on cleaning our guns. the national team coach and the owner of a competition shooting supply house both said that there is no harm in pulling patches/brushes back through. they also said nylon brushes are a waste of time. they gave us handfuls of brass brushes to use.
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 1:02:42 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Kooter:

and push them down the bore (one direction only, please).



what is your reasoning for only going in one direction? i have heard other people say this before. when i was at the Olympic Training Center in Colo Sprgs, we had a class on cleaning our guns. the national team coach and the owner of a competition shooting supply house both said that there is no harm in pulling patches/brushes back through. they also said nylon brushes are a waste of time. they gave us handfuls of brass brushes to use.



I think the reasoning is that funk will act as an abrasive as you pull it back through the bore. I'm finding myself to be less and less anal as time goes by because IMHO it just douesn't make that much of a difference. There are champion shooters that run one end of the cleaning spectrum to the other. There is no right way.
Link Posted: 6/28/2003 5:15:05 PM EDT

Originally Posted By Kooter:

and push them down the bore (one direction only, please).



what is your reasoning for only going in one direction? i have heard other people say this before. when i was at the Olympic Training Center in Colo Sprgs, we had a class on cleaning our guns. the national team coach and the owner of a competition shooting supply house both said that there is no harm in pulling patches/brushes back through. they also said nylon brushes are a waste of time. they gave us handfuls of brass brushes to use.



I'm going by two sources for this. The first is a friend of mine who shot on the US Olympic team in Atlanta, and was on the USAMU team for more years than I can remember. The second source is from a guy that I shoot with on a regular basis. He also happens to be a PHD'd metallurgist, working for GE Aircraft engines. They both say that after the combustion of the powder, some carbonatious materials can be left, that are even harder than silica (sand). This can be enough to scratch a match grade barrel. On a chrome lined military barrel, it's not so important. But on a $300 match barrel, it could be enough to ruin it.
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